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Full text of "Pacific Oil Reporter (1901-1902)"

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CALIFORNIA 



EDD7 12QkSM7 1 <^ R Y. 

California Slate Library 



J UN 1903 



to £c(a05 P| vJl.rf.3 



V IH 






Rndo^scd hy >thc California Petroleum Miner**' AKgoclation. 





SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1901 






[V* DEALERS IN \J 



The Berron Special Boiler 

"Beats the World" 

ALL SIZES IN STOCK 

SAN FRANCISCO 
411 MARKET STREET 






$;B$S$$SS$$«S«5«W$SS*K3«S««$S^^ . 



We ofier you 



Don't You Think 

a good opportunity for investment ? Thousands 
have read our little booklet during the past 30 days 
and hundreds are placing their surplus cash with us 
because they have investigated and know we are 
safe, strong and progressive. They want to buy our 
stock at bedrock prices. DO YOU ? 



The third edition of our little 
booklet has been received. You 
should write for one. 






ADDRESS 

Standard Consolidated 
Oil and Land Company 

ROOM 7, 532 MARKET STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MEMBERS CALIFORNIA PETROLEUM MINERS' ASSOCIATION 



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$100 BUYS 

200 SHARES 
OIL STOCKS 

In Ai Oil Company; 200 barrel well. Stock sold in lots 
of $[00 and up. Guaranteed against loss by 

Security Gold Bond 

Indorsed by a Trust Company of $1,000,000 paid up capi- 
tal. Cash returned at maturity of bond. Safe, legitimate. 
Investigate. Stock shares in all dividends and profits. 
Handsome illustrated booklets of oil fields, with official 
map, for 10 cents in stamps. 

ILLINOIS OIL BOND COMPANY 

Room 506 Dearborn Street, Chicogo. 

Home Office, Room 7, first floor, Mills Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 






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Struck Oil 

South of the River 



The Panorama has struck oil at 1185 feet in 14, 29-28, a 
mile and a half south of the Discovery well, in the Kern 
River District. 

This strike has opened up an immense new territory. 
The oil is lighter and more valuable than the oil found 
north of the river, and the oil sand is more prolific. 

I have several hundred acres of land south of the river 
near where the Wizard Oil Company is now down 1,057 
feet, with every prospect of striking oil. 

In order to prove this land I will sell 

50 ACRES AT $100 PER ACRE. 

EASY TERMS 

This offer must be taken up at once or it will be with- 
drawn. 

None but principals need apply. For particulars ad- 
dress 

B. W. W., 

Care of Pacific Oil Reporter 

3 [8 Pine Street, San Francisco. 



■ ««»«S«$«3$S$5S«SSS«S«S$^ 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 






\ FRANCISCO, CAL.. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8. iqoi. 



Prick, Tkn Crnts 



ENCOURAGING OUTLOOK. 



Increasing Activity In California Oil Fields 
During the Month of October. 



The turning point in the de- 
velopment work of the oil fields 
throughout the state seems to 
have been reached, and the month 
just ended has resulted in in- 
creasing activity in almost every 
field. Although not as much de- 
velopment was done in October 
as was done in April last, still the 



ing on for five months between the 
Los Angeles Producers' Association 
and the Oil Storage and Trans- 
portation company reached the 
climax of disagreement, with the 
result that the producers indi- 
vidually have signed up — or have 
announced their intention so to 
do— with the Oil Storage for the 




total of 26,820 barrels per day, or lin <-' is completed and oil is being 
804,600 barrels per month. The pumped from the southern fields 
fifty wells of the Sunset district to the bay, oil certificates will nn- 
have an average production of 70,- 1 donbtedly be issued by the Stand- 
ard Oil company to the different 
producers and oil will have a fixed 
price. This is not the case at the 
present time. The unsettled state 
of affairs with reference to the 
price of oil is undoubtedly due to 
the fact that it is not by any 
means settled whether the pro- 
d combine is successfully or- 
ganized and perfected or not. At 
present the outlook for the suc- 
cess of the combine is not at all 
favorable. Seme large companies, 
like the Peerless and the San 
Joaquin, will not join the combine 
unless some radical changes are 
made by those who have the affair 
in charge. 



000 barrels per mouth: the Coa- 
linga wells will produce ;,oo,ooo 
barrels, and the Los Angeles field 
is estimated at 75,000 barrels per 
month. The total yield for the 
year, according to W. L. Watts, is 
7,000,000 barrels per year al- 
though other estimates say that 
California can produce at the 
present time 9,000,000 barrels. 

The consumption of oil in San 
Francisco is increasing very 
rapidly, still two years ago San 



One of the San Joaquin Company's Wells. The Central Figure in the Group is John A. Bunting. 



amount for the last month is 
greatly in excess of what it has 
been during the summer months. 
The statistics show an increase of 
twenty-four rigs, and an increase 
of 116 wells drilling, which is far 
in excess of the record for August. 
The McKittrick-Sunset district 
shows the largest activity, while 
the districts south of Kern River 
show a large increase in actual 
development work, this being 
especially true in Newhall field. 

There is no doubt but the pro- 
posed pipe line of the Standard 
Oil company has had a large effect 
in tending to put the oil business 
on a firmer basis. The completion 
of the Sunset road has also had an 
influence for good. According to 
the Los Angeles Herald the at- 
mosphere has cleared consider- 
able in that city, and for good or 
ill, the producers know just ex- 
actly what confronts them. The 
negotiations which have been go- 



sale of their oil on the basis of the 
old contract. Such radical action 
could have but one termination so 
far as the association was con- 
cerned — it went out of business. 
While still existing as a corpora- 
tion the Los Angeles Producers' 
Association as a practical working 
body is dead. It was organized 
on such lines as to permit mem- 
bers to vote in accordance with 
the number of wells controlled 
and it therefore was made possible 
by combination for a very few 
men to use the strength of the 
association to further individual 
interests. That this was not done 
is merely to say that on account 
of this very fault the association 
was not found to be a workable 
proposition, and in any reorgan- 
ization this defect will have to be 
accounted for. 

The Kern River field has now 
447 producing wells which will 
average sixty barrels per day, or a 



Francisco was not using more 
than 1,000 barrels per year; today 
she is using over 1,000,000 barrels 
with the demand constantly in- 
creasing. 

The railroads are now using 
nearly 4,000,000 barrels and the 
refineries are increasing in number 
and capacity. 

The state is today using over 
7,000,000 barrels to say the least. 

The different fields, especially 
in the Kern River district, are 
being increased. In other north 
northern counties much develop- 
ment work is being done, and 
there is no doubt but what 
new fields will be opened up be- 
fore the close of the year. While 
there is no boom in the oil busi- 
ness such as could be noticed a 
year and a-half ago, the industry 
is on a firmer footing than ever 
and the purely speculative ele- 
ment is eliminated. 

As soon as the Standard pipe 



Oil for Yellowstone Park. 

Captain H. C. Chittenden, sup- 
erintendent of the Yellowstone 
National Park, was in Kern City 
this week to examine the oiled 
roads with a view to oiling these 
iu the National Park next year. 

During the summer a great 
many tourists visited the park, 
and before the season was over 
the roads were in a terrible condi- 
tion, and it is the intention of the 
park commission to use oil if it is 
satisfactory. Captain Chittenden 
has driven over many miles of 
oiled roads, and is reported as so 
well satisfied with the efficiency 
of oil on roads that he will recom- 
mend its use in the wonderful 
park. 

In an interview in the Bakers- 
field Californian, Captain Chitten- 
den is reported as having said: 
"Yellowstone has about 450 miles 
of road to keep in good condition, 
and one of the hardest problems 
for the authorities to solve is that 
of dust. The use of water is very 
expensive as well as unsatisfac- 
tory. I find the oil has been given 
a thorough test, and so far as I can 
see is a success in every way. I 
is a great dust destroyer, and an 
enhancer of good roads. In my 
report to the Government authori- 
ties I will state that Kern County 
oil is especially good for putting 
roadways in excellent condition." 
In speaking of the oiled streets, 
he expressed the opinion that if 
the surface is prepared the road 
should be equal to an asphalt 
pavement. 

One of the drawbacks of the 
use of oil in the park, which will 
be taken into consideration, will 
be the price for oil in carload lots 
laid down at the park. 

"The price at the well is more 
than reasonable, but the freight 
rates are exorbitant," said Chit- 
tenden. "It will cost us more 
than $ r.50 per barrel before it is 
sprinkled on the roads. Yet this 
will not matter so long as we can 
see that by its adoption we can 
get good results." 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



THE CUYAMA. 



A Promising New Oil District in 
the South. 

The Cuyama district, an area 
known as the corners of Kern 
Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo 
and Ventura counties, and carry 
ing on its surface many promising 
indications of valuable oil depos- 
its, is daily attracting more atten 
tion, says Copper, Oil and Finance 
and it is probable that ere long 
several rigs will be testing its pos- 
sibilities. 

A report has just reached this 
city that the only development 
thus far attempted in the Cuyama 
district has been well rewarded 
A well has been put down, it is 
stated, to a depth of. 900 feet on 
the west side of township 9 north, 
range 26 west, and about four 
miles southwest of the Cuyama 
ranch house. It is said that a 
good quantity of high grade oil 
was discovered at this depth, and 
the well was immediately capped 
and the operators commenced to 
hustle around for control of neigh- 
boring lands. This venture was 
mentioned in its early stages ex- 
clusively in this journal. 

W. W. Young, a well known 
mining and civil engineer, has just 
returned from a trip through the 
Cuyama district and has prepared 
a report embodying the results of 
his observations. Following are 
some excerpts from this report: 

"A low range of hills running 
from the northwest to the south- 
east, called the Pallata hills, ap- 
pear to constitute the separating 
line between the heavy oil and the 
light oil regions. The former lies 
on the northeast side of this 
range, and are manifested in the 
Kern county fields just men- 
tioned, while the light oil area is on 
the southwest side of the range and 
embraces the lands in Ventura 
county described above. These 
latter lands have a distinct paraf- 
fine formation, the surface indica- 
tions being shale, sand rock and 
paraffine and gas holes, throwing 
out light oil on the water." 

"The petroleum product of 
these lands would be described as 
having a paraffine base and be of 
the character that is refined into 
illuminating oil. The strata being 
very flat in places, showing a 
horizontal condition like that of 
the Kern River field, more than 
anticlines, indicates the striking 
of oil at from 700 to 1000 feet. 

" The Cuyama river runs through 
these lands, affording plenty of 
water for developing purposes. 
The course of this river marks the 
natural route of a railroad from 
Bakersfield to the coast for a 
stretch of level land follows the 
river on each side, almost its en- 
tire length. Such a railroad is 
one of the certainties of the early 
future. 

"The railroad is now at Sunset, 
a short distance from these fields. 
And the surveyors are now in the 
Cuyama surveying a continuation 



of this road to Santa Maria, which 
is situated nn the coast. And still 
you are not dependent on the 
railroad to get the product to the 
coast, as a pipe line can easily be 
built to Santa Barbara, a distance 
of about twenty-eight miles, which 
is situated on the coast. The ele- 
vation of this land is about 5,000 
feet. So you see, the oil can be 
run by gravity. 

" There has been enough money 
appropriated by the state to build 
a road from Santa Barbara to the 
Cuyama, and the pipe line could 
be laid along the road easily. 
There is a postoffice on the land, 
and the county road from the 
Sunset is good to haul machinery 
in on. And you can easily haul 
a ton to a horse; different from so 
many oil fields, the essentials of 
economical development work are 
on hand. As said before, water, 
so necessary in drilling opera- 
tions, is to be had in abundance. 
Stiaight pine timber for derrick 
building and fuel is also plentiful. 

" With all these advantages, we 
are far better situated than the 
Kern River fields, which two 
years ago I could have bought for 
$2.50 an acre. Less than a vear 
ago T sold at from $6,000 to $8,000 
an acre. The Cuyama lands only 
need development to bring them 
to the same price; and develop- 
ment is rapidlv coming that way 
as several wells are in course of 
construction on either side of this 
land. And there will be several 
parties on those lands in the near 
future, drilling, and in my opinion 
inside of a year from today those 
lands will bring a thousand dol- 
lars or more. It is without doubt 
the largest oil field in Southern 
California, as well as the lightest 
oil." 

In addition to the railroad sur- 
veys adverted to by Mr. Young, 
it is known that the Santa Fe 
Railroad company has a survey 
party out selecting a possible 
route through the Cuyama region 
to the coast, the course to be fol- 
lowed being practically parallel 
with the Cuyama river. 



WYOMING=UTAH FIELD. 



Development Being Done With 
California Capital 

According to the Los Angeles 
Heiald, the Utah-Wyoming oil 
field is to be exploited largely 
with the aid of California men 
and California capital. During 
the week just ended a party of 
oil men well known in this state 
left Salt Lake city and are now in 
the big Green river basin deter- 
mining where the first well shall 
be sunk for the California-Utah 
Oil company. The party is com- 
posed of C. M. Kilburn, W. M. 
Spencer of Oakland, W. J. Berry, 
W. I. Roberts, Walter Scott and 
Willard Cooper of Selma; F. H. 
Mitchell, of Fresno, and L. Parker 
of Santa Ana. This company con- 
trols several thousand acres of 
land in the Green river basin, and 



a drilling outfit has been shipped 
for immediate use. 

The Arizona-Utah Paraffine Oil 
company is another corporation 
that is about to open up in the 
same vicinity, and is being backed 
by Prescott and Jerome (Arizona) 
capital. Ex-Congressman Wilson, 
of Prescott is president; H. J 
Allen, financial secretary at Sena- 
tor Clark's United Verde mines, 
vice president; H. R. Wood of 
Jerome, secretary and treasurer, 
and J. A. C. Freund, general man- 
ager. This company owns 2,800 
acres of oil land east aud north of 
Green River station. 

S. S. Bettys, one of the oil men 
who pioneered the industry in 
this state, has also established 
himself in Utah, and an oil excite- 
ment is beginning to make itself 
apparent throughout that state. 
The oil found in Utah is said to be 
of very high grade. In conver- 
sation with a Herald reporter at 
Salt Lake, W. I. Roberts of Selma, 
who is interested in the new de- 
velopments, said: 

Experts that I have had at 
work assure me that Wyoming 
oil contains elements that will 
make it worth from $11 to $15 a 
barrel. There is every indication 
that it is in abundance, but of 
course until wells are sunk no one 
will know that. The first big 
strike will set this community 
crazy, and brirg on a wild 
scramble, and a boom, and I think 
it is only a question of weeks be- 
fore the excitement will begin." 

In the Wvoming district, in- 
deed, an oil boom is on, and the 
town of Kemmerer is given up to 
nil prospectors. The Fossil field 
lies southwest of Kemmerer, on 
the Oregon Short Line, and the 
followine companies have either 
begun work or are on the eve of 
so doing. 

The Inter-Mountain Oil com- 
pany, in which are interested 
Senator Clark, K.L. Doheny, Perry 
Heath, Richard Kerens, Jr., and 
others, have large holdings in the 
supposed oil belt, and machinery 
is now on its way. The Wyoming 
Paraffine Oil company had what 
was considered a thirty-barrel 
well, but owing to imperfect cas- 
ing, it caved in a wepk ago with- 
out, however, stopping the flow. 
The well is now being cleaned 
out, when drilling will be resumed 
and it- is expected that at greater 
depth a stronger flow will be en- 
countered. 

The Fossil Consolidated com- 
pany is drilling on the territory 
adjacent to the Wyoming's ground, 
and has now reached 320 feet. 
The Fossil Oil Association, the 
Wyoming-Utah Oil company, the 
Utah- Wyoming Oil and Fuel com- 
pany, the Kemmerer Oil and De- 
velopment company, and two 
other companies all have repre- 
sentatives in the field, and are 
getting rigs to work with such 
speed as they can. 

Land is being surveyed for 
miles in every direction, and it is 



proposed to lay out a town site at 
Fossil. In conversation with a 
Herald reporter Senator Clark 
said: 

"Our machinery is on the way, 
and will soon "begin boring. The 
Inter-Mountain property, 80,000 
acres, is in the right belt for pro- 
duction, and our first work will be 
about thirteen miles from Pied- 
mont to Fossil, and we will give 
it ail a thorough test. We are 
more than satisfied with the out- 
look." 

The last prominent oil man to 
show active interest in the Fossil 
field is C. A. Canfield, who has 
purchased three new standard 
rigs and other accessories for work, 
which he is sending to Fossil. J. 
Kerr is to accompany the material 
and act as field superintendent 
when work begins. One of the 
very earliest of the Los Angeles 
field was F." M. Phelps, who is 
connected with the Southern Paci- 
fic company, and who selected 
5400 acres of the choice lands near 
Fossil last spring for the associa- 
tion he represented. Among other 
of his associates are: D. W. Carl- 
ton, E. C. Wilson, R. T. Brain, C. 
Ferguson, E. N. Brown, W. C. 
Brain and H. R. Bingham. Messrs. 
P. L. Griffin and S. A. Hubbell, 
who are operating in the field, 
are also residents of Los Angeles. 



THE SCRIPPER CASES. 



No Decision Expected Until De- 
cember. 

A Washington dispatch to the 
Los Angeles Herald says that it is 
unlikely that a decision in the 
California oil scrippers' cases 
would be reached before next De- 
cember. 

It will be recalled that Judge 
Vandeventer, the associate attor- 
ney general of the Interior De- 
partment, listened to arguments in 
these cases in September. It was 
Judge Vandeventer who also 
heard the arguments of attorneys 
on both sides of this controversy 
early last spring. It will also be 
recalled that the decision of the 
department was in favor of the 
oil men and against the scrip- 
pers The last argument was sub- 
mitted as a review in several per- 
sonal cases. 

While nothing definite can be 
ascertained from Judge Vande- 
venter regarding the probable de- 
cision growing out of the review 
cases in September, it is not be- 
lieved that the decision of Secre- 
tary of Interior Hitchcock last 
spring will be changed. The final 
decision of the department, how- 
ever, is awaited here, as well as in 
California, with a great deal of in- 
terest. 

Considerable "initial" produc- 
tion which is supposed to be O. K. 
is in reality N. G. 



Operators down at Beaumont 
are not the first ones who have 
discovered that oil won't do its 
own marketing. 



[FIC oil. RF.POKTF.R 



OIL LAND PATENTS. 



Official VIcvsh of General Kinder 
Hermann. 

The annual report of Hon. Bin- 
der Hermann. Commissioner Gen 
eral of the Genera! Land Office, 
contains some important recom- 
mendations as to the Southern 
California otl lands. Mr. Her- 
mann says- on this subject: 

"The oil fields of Southern Cali- 
fornia and their alleged unlawful 
appropriation by lieu selectors 
under the act of June 4. 
were treated of at length in my 
report last year. Th-re has been 
DO abatement of explorations for 
oil in California, and prospectors 
have been active in other localities, 
notably Wyoming and Colorado 
"Suspension heretofore made of 
townships alleged to contain cal- 
culable deposits of oil from disposi- 
tion under agricultural law and 
examination of lands by special 
agents have allayed to an extent 
the excitement heretofore existing, 
caused by supposed appropriation 
of these lands by lieu scripptrs 
These suspensions continued dur- 
ing the year, and must continue 
until relief is obtained by legisla- 
tion, the mining laws and regula- 
tions being inadequate to protect 
bona fide prospectors who are 
spending their time and money 
exploring for it. 

"I would again refer to my re- 
port of April 3, 1900, on Senate 
Bill 3326, Fifty-sixth Congress, 
first session, and the recommenda- 
tion there made for enactment, as 
lollows: 'That any persons or asso- 
ciation of persons authorized to 
enter lands under the mining laws 
of the Unied States may enter 
and obtain a patent to lands con- 
taining petroleum or its mineral 
oils and chiefly valuable therefor 
under the provisions of the laws 
relating to placer mineral claims, 
provided that locators of placer- 
miueral claims believed to contain 
p troleum or other mineral oils, 
shall have three months from and 
after making their claims on the 
ground within which to begin 
work for the purpose of complet- 
ing the discovery, and such dis- 
covery, when made, while work 
iog a claim with reasonable dili- 
gence, shall relate back and have 
effect, nunc pro tunc, as though 
made before, or r t the time of 
marking the claim on the ground. 
No adverse right to any part of 
the claim can be accrued by other 
parties within said period of three 
months, nor thereafter while work 
thereon is being prosecuted with 
reasonable diligence, but failuie 
to prosecute work for six months 
or complete such work of dis- 
covery within twelve months from 
the date of marking the claim on 
the ground shall be considered as 
an abandonment of the claim, and 
failure to begin work within said 
period of three months shall work 
a forfeiture of the claim.' 

"Some such legislation has. since 
the decision of the department of 



April 35. 1901. in the case of the the salt being lawful] such surveys were 

Ken but not by purchase made, amounting to $7356, beside 

ne imperative. That do contemplated by the almost an equal amount for mineral 
holds 'The person making a selec- act. I mention this matter as an surveys. Applications were re- 
tion under the act of June 4 is»7. instance where it may become ceived for mine surveys to the 
who has complied with all the necessary in the near future to number of 117, and instructions 
terms and conditions necessary to place a limitation on tlie possessory therefore were issued. Twenty- 
entitle him to a patent to selected title which may now be maintained two applications for the survey of 
land, acquires a vested interest under section 1334 of the Revised agricultural lands were received 
therein, and is to be regarded as Statutes.' by petitions signed by 100 settlers. 
an equitable owner thereof. The On the question of the Utah and Nineteen surveying contracts were 
right to patent under said act, Arizona boundary commissions he awarded, with an estimated 11a- 
once vested, is for most pur| 'The Sundry Civil Appro- bility. Including smaller surveys 



the equivalent of a patent issued, 
and when, in fact, it is issued, a 
patent relates back to the time 
when the right to it became fixed, 
and takes effect as of that date. 
Questions respecting claims and 
t he character of selected lands are 
to be determined by conditions 
existing at the time when all re- 
quirements necessary to obtaining 
title have been complied with by 
the selector, and nochange in such 
condition subsequently occuring 
can effect his rights The Land 
Depaitment has jurisdiction and 
pow,er, either of its own motion or 
at the instance of third parties, at 
any t'me before a patent is issued 
and after appropriate notice to 
institute and carry on such pro- 
ceedings as may be necessary to 
enable it to determine whether 
the selected lands were of the 
requisite class and character and 
whether the selection was in other 
respects regular and in conformity 
with the requirements of the act. 
But the determination must relate 
to the time when the selector had 
done all that was required of him 
in order to perfect his right to a 
patent.' 

"Under this decision, and with- 
out the suspension referred to, 
there would be no protection for 
mineral-oil claimants, but the con- 
dition would offer a great induce- 
ment for scrippers to select valu- 
able oil lands. Should Congress 
legislate as here recommended, all 
withdrawals could be revoked; the 
oil industry would be stimulated, 
and mineral-oil lands would be, 
in fact, reserved from sale except 
as provided by law. 

"An act extending the mining 
laws to saline lands was approved 
January 31, 1890. Such legisla- 
tion was recommended in my 
report for 1900, wherein I called 
attention to the fact that in some 
states vast deposits of crystalized 
salt are being developed at great 
expense; that the parties operat- 
ing these mines or deposits are not 
charged with bad faith, but that 
unless relief be obtained by Con- 
gressional legislation they must 
be stopped. That there was urgent 
need of legislation which would 
permit the lawful development of 
these deposits or beds of crystalized 
salt. 

"So far as reported, no applica- 
tions have been made for salt 
claims. The situation is very like 
that of gold-placer mining in 
Alaska. Salt operators are proba- 
bly now proceeding with the law- 
ful development of their claims, 



priation Act of June 6, 1900, ap- under special instructions, of 
propriated $22,8000 for ascertain- $34,502. 

ment. survey, marking and per- The drafting division of the 
mane nt (-stablislimentof the bound- Land Office prepared maps or plat 
ary between the state of Utah and and copies thereof connected with 
the territory of Arizona, being that public-land surveys, including 
portiou of the parallel of 37 deg., tracings, for official use, number- 
north latitude, lying between 32 iug 2S7, and for mineral surveys, 
deg. and 37 deg. of longitude, west 716 plats, making in all, 1063. The 
from Washington, an estimated Surveyor-General approved sur- 
distauce of 277 miles. Under date veys within the year covered by 
of October 13, 1900, this office his report under thirteen contracts 
entered into a contract with a com- ; and eleven sets of special instruc- 
petent surveyor for the survey of tions. They represent a total 
said boundary line. The liability ' amount of over 736 miles of sur- 
of this contract is $221,000. The ' ve y ed lines, about 200,000 acres. 
, ■ . , . ., 1 The Spanish archives, which are 

survey has been executed in the 1 . ., r . , , t . „ 

J in the custody of the Surveyor- 

field, but the returns of the sur- General, have been made more 
vey have not yet reached this accessible to the public by the in- 
office. An examiner of surveys sertion of an English translation 
will be sent to test the accuracy at ' the end of each of the fift y 



and condition of the work." 

In summarizing the general 
operations in California during the 
past year, Mr. Hermann states 
that the apportionment for pub ic- 
land surveys for the fiscal year in 
California was $10,000. In addi- 
tion thereto, special deposits of 



seven volumes. The translations 
are in the nature of brief abstracts 
by which the purport each docu- 
ment is indicated, enabling those 
who do not read Spanish to consult 
the records. There are also 813 
packages of documents connected 
with private land claims which 
have undergone thorough revision 
and thorough arrangement. 



BUY 

CALIFORNIA 
OIL STOCKS 



OF. 



JOSEPH B.T0PL1TZ 

Member of Producers' Oil Exchange. 
Member California Petroleum Miners' Association. 

330 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Orders for Buying and Selling California Oil Stocks 
Promptly Attended to. 

Reliable information on Oil Stocks Furnished Gratis. 

Unlisted Stocks a Specialty 

Correspondence Solicited. 

Reference — California Safe Deposit & Trust Co , San 
Francisco, Cal. 

For sale cheap, 

10,000 (or less) shares "California Crude." 

Any reasonable offer will be accepted. 



PACIFIC Oil, REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

(-indorsed By the California Petroleum 
Miners' Association. 



W B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 
Office and Editorial rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Bush, J76 

TERMS 

One Year $ 2 5° 

Six Months J 5° 

Three Months I O0 

Single Copies roc 

STRICTLY IN A.RVA.NCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Re- 
porter, 318 Pine stieet, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33, Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name ana address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal 
as second-class matter. 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1901. 

In the early days of the Pennsyl- 
vania oil excitement, 
It Soon one of the districts 
Gave Out was called the Red 
Hot district in the 
Sucker Rod belt near Chamberg. 
The district consisted of a narrow, 
crooked belt only about 100 feet 
wide and less than a mile long. 

Derricks were erected as close 
together as they could be built, on 
lots about 20x^0 feet. The field 
looked very much as the Beau- 
mont field looks to day so far as 
the crowding of derricks is con- 
cerned. 

The wells were good, yielding 
on an average 600 barrels a day, 
when oil was worth $5 and $6 a 
barrel. The wells were gushers, 
and when first opened up the 
rush of oil and gas was tremendous. 

The output of these wells con- 
tinued steadily to decrease, until 
at the end of eight months the 
field was practically exhausted. 

The Beaumont field is destined 
to go through the same experience, 
and the motto "Make hay while 
the sun shines" is receiving there 
now close application. 

It is estimated that already over 
1,000,000 barrels of oil at Beau- 
mont has been totally wasted in 
simply turning on the wells for 
exhibition purposes for the bene- 
fit of contractors and oil specu- 
lators. 

In a few months some of the 
companies there will be needing 
those 1,000,000 barrels in order to 
fill contracts. 



Now that the fields of the East 
are giving out, 
The Standard the Standard is 
Refinery removing the 

tankage ma- 
terial from the East where it has 
been in use in localities where the 
wells have failed. These tanks 
are being set up as rapidly as 
possible in the Kern River field. 
The supposition is that the Stand- 
ard intends to avail itself of the 



great new supply of oil found in 
the Kern River field. 

It is stated that thirty per cent 
of Kern oil can be converted into 
kerosene. The by-products con- 
sist of distillates, lubricants, and 
especially liquid asphaltum. These 
will constitute the main by-pro- 
ducts of the new Point Richmond 
refinery, and an immense amount 
of paving material will be turned 
out; so much in fact will be turned 
out at Point Richmond that the 
price of asphaltum will un- 
doubtedly be greatly lowered, thus 
causing a greater amount of this 
product to be used than formerly. 

There seems to be no doubt but 
that the Standard Oil company is 
expending in the neighborhood 
of $10,000,000 in tanks, pipe lines 
and a refinery, for the reason that 
it intends to use California oil in 
order to enable it to continue to 
supply the constantly increasing 
demand for kerosene and the by- 
products of petroleum. 



The Beaumont Enterprise of the 
date of November 
Price oi 1st states that 

Texas Land since the Hogg- 
Swayne Syndi- 
cate withdrew their land from the 
market, there has been an appre- 
ciable advance in the price of 
Spindletopland. One prospective 
buyer stated that the best he could 
do was a lot 50 feet by 20 feet 
for $4,000. 

If this statement be true, it 
means that Spindletop land is now 
worth $174,240 per acre, and that 
on that acre there are forty-three 
lots, each owned by one oil com- 
pany, although in several in- 
stances the lots are still further 
divided and derricks erected so 
close to one another that their 
bases touch. It is also stated that 
in some cases one derrick is owned 
by three or even more companies 
operating on a division of the 
prospective output. This crowd- 
ing together of so many companies 
on one acre of land can hardly be 
understood by Kern county opera- 
tors, where the smallest holding 
in the heart of the Kern River 
field is at least ten ac es, and 
where several of the large produc- 
ing companies own the best part 
of a section. 

In the heart of the Kern River 
field, twenty acres of land, on 
which are already four or five 
wells, was offered recently at 
$25,000. These wells however 
are not large producers, but may 
go 150 or 200 barrels per day if 
deepened. 

There seems to be no doubt but 
that the area of producing terri- 
tory in the Beaumont field does 
not exceed at the outside no 
acres, and when wells are drilled 
throughout this territory as near 
together as the derricks can be 
erected, it can only be a com- 
paratively short time before this 
field is exhausted. 

In the East in the best fields in 



Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana and 
West Virginia, experience has 
proved that even when wells are 
not drilled too close to each other 
that the life of a well will not ex- 
ceed three years. In Beaumont 
it will be a wonder if these wells 
last six months after the field is 
entirely covered. 



ELEMENTS OF SUCCESS- 



How to Make Dry Wells Valuable 
as Pointers. 

The Petroleum Review of Eon- 
don includes the following general 
observations in an editorial review 
of some English investments in 
the Texas oil field: 

"There are some facts, most 
vital to the welfare of petroleum 
concerns, which, it is to be feared, 
are quite lost sight of by oil pros- 
pecting companies. The general 
impression seems to be that one 
has only to obtain the coutrol of a 
certain area of land within the oil- 
bearing zone to sink wells, and a 
good yield of oil will result. In 
fact, the same principles are ap- 
plied to petroleum prospecting as 
are applied to the mining of solid 
minerals. How erroneous such 
methods are is eloquently proved 
by the small number of successful 
oil companies in existence; how 
large capitals dwindle away, 
thousand after thousand, without 
any result; how well after well is 
sunk, proviug utterly abortive, due 
to ignorance and incompetence on 
the part of those who are supposed 
to know. Timely, therefore, were 
the cautionary remarks made and 
supported s>t the meeting of the 
Texas Oilfields, L,td., and they can 
not be too frequently reiterated, 
for they embody the very essence 
of the success or failure of an oil 
company. Dr. Redwood un- 
doubtedly enunciated a truth 
which has certainly not beep re- 
garded with sufficient seriousness 
by petroleum prospectors, and that 
was that wells which prove un- 
productive should be made as 
valuable as the productive wells, 
which, in more homely phraseology, 
means that upon your failures you 
should build your successes by 
using to the utmost the power of 
observation, by studying every 
particle of evidence which is 
brought to light by drilling opera- 
tions, weighing carefully and ap- 
plying the results to future work. 
At the present time the sinking of 
wells is far too haphazard a game, 
and nature, in the majority of 
cases, abhors haphazard methods, 
demanding that laws and princi- 
ples should govern the search for 
her hidden wealth, even as they 
have controlled the previous pro- 
cesses of concealment. 

"It is but a rational contention 
also that the advice and guidance 
of an expert should be sought 
periodically during the develop- 
ment of an oil property, for who 
can better advise than the man 
who has studied the land geo- 
graphically, geologically and with 



that scientific instinct which, al- 
though having nothing to do with 
stones and strata, is, nevertheless, 
the outcome of something perhaps 
more valuable, even varied ex- 
perience and a wide knowledge. 
"As a rule the company is done 
with the expert when he has told 
them what he thinks of the 
property they desire to purchase; 
the sinking of wells they seem to 
regard as belonging to another 
department of work, when in 
reality it is here that the expert 
should be most valuable, because 
here begins the real work of the 
company." 



ON THE FERRY BOATS. 



All the Boats to Be Fitted Out As 
Oil Burners. 

The hold with which oil as a 
fuel is gaining with the railroad 
officials is shown in the decision 
to equip all the boats for burning 
the new fuel. East week the 
company secured permission from 
James S. Dumont, United States 
superintendent of the steamboat 
inspection service, to equip the 
ferry-boats Oakland, Solano, Ber- 
keley, Thoroughfare and Transit 
with oil burners, following the 
granting of permission for the use 
of oil on the Piedmont. It is 
probable that when the ferry-boat 
Newark is launched from the ways 
at West Oakland, after undergo- 
ing extensive repairs, that its 
boilers too will be fitted for burn- 
ing oil. The boilers for the New- 
ark are being built at the Risdon 
Iron Works in San Francisco, but 
the work of construction has been 
greatly hampered by the machin- 
ists' strike. Following the Pied- 
mont, which is already being 
operated with oil, the big ferry- 
boat Solano used for transferring 
the trains across the straits at 
Benicia will be fitted with oil 
burners. The oil tanks for the 
vessel are now being built at the 
West Oakland yards and the 
ferry-boat will probably come 
down from the upper bay to be 
fitted some time during the latter 
part of this week. 

Beside the Southern Pacific 
boats the Santa Fe has received 
permission to equip its ferry 
steamer, the San Pablo, for burn- 
ing oil, and the North Pacific 
Coast line will soon install the 
new fuel on the ferry-boat Tamal- 
pais. 



Oil in Mexico. 

A letter from C. R. Troxel, who 
is interested in oil properties in 
Mexico, in state of Chihuahua, 
states the prospect there is very 
encouraging. The company ex- 
pects to begin active development 
work at once. Prospecting for oil 
has resulted in finding indications 
of the existence of large bodies of 
oil of a refining nature, which will 
run from 30 to 35 degrees. 

The field is located about 175 
miles from the railroad, and a pipe 
line will be laid as soon as the 
amount of production warrants. 



;iic nil. 



TICK 



A CRITICISM. 



Beaumont Oil President Criti.i„e* 
this Paper 

The following letter 
reived this week from President 
I. D. Mills of the (deal Oil and 
Refining Company ( f Beaumont, 
Texas: 

1901. 
Pacii ic 1 r ran, San Pran 

Cat: 
('.cntlciuen — I find a clipping from 

lobcr .'5tli, also a report 
from the Beanmont tieM us to tbe 
capacity of ooi wells, and the necessity 
for pumps. Now, if yon would take a 
<'. nut field you would endorse those 
reports a^ being in the main correct, as 
there is not n pump pumping in the 
fieltt, ami never lias been, and there is 
no one who baS taken the trouble to in- 
vestigate who will make any snch state 
mentsns ill your issue referred to, unless 
he wishes to injure someone or th< 
in general. I live in California, and 
have more oil interests there than in 
Beanmont and I think the Kern River 
oil field, next to Beaumont, the greatest 
in the world, and that there will be an 
ample market for the Californ'a product 
in time. We certainly have enough oil 
in Beaumont to supply tbe outside world 
after all the country east of the Rocky 
mountains is supplied. 

I write this thinking you would not 
wish to publish anything in your valu- 
able paper of tbe oil industry that was 
not correct, and knowing you have been 
misinformed and assuming you want to 
do the fair thing, I have taken this 
liberty of writing you. Wishing every 
good thing for the California oil fields, [ 
remain, yours truly, I. D. Mn.t.s. 

To the above letter the follow- 



ing : 

of the Pacii 

Mr. I. Ii. Mills. Beaum 

recent 
>ill My that 1 understand on the 
luthont) the I M. I 

pump- 
ing its Beanmont wells. 

I Ills.' know from those who have 
visited yonr fields, and who .,, 
fcctlv familiar with 1 astern fields from 
their earliest development, that no tviri 

many 
oil wells drilled into it without mi 
diminishing the gas pressure and 
Sequent!} lessening the natural flow of 
oil. 

I believe that your Beaumont field is 

one Of tbe greatest tields in the world at 

the present time so far as its limited 
area is concerned, but I am equalb 

vilu'ed that tbe way you people are 
abusing that territory, tbe output will 
rapidly decrease, and that In a year's 
time if not before you will be putting 
your wells on the pump. 

You will have about the same experi- 
ence they did in 1867, in the Sucker 
Rod district ill Pennsylvania. The wells 
in this district were the biggest wells 
struck in Pennsylvania. Derricks were 
erected so close they almost touched 
each other. Every well was a gusher, 
and oil at that time was worth from J5 to 
|6 a barrel. That district lasted for 
eight months. 

I hope your district will last longer, 
but I shall be very much surprised if its 
history is not about the same as that of 
tbe Sucker Rod belt in 1867. Yours 
respectfully, \V. B. W'inn. 

If the production of fuel oil con- 
tinues to increase it may ulti- 
mately be said oi the heating busi- 
ness of the couutry that it is "all 
fired cheat)." 



AT LOS ANGELES. 

Bottom Still Out 01 the OH 
Market, 

According to the Los An. 
Times there is much dissatisfac- 
tion in the ranks of the oil men, 
and it is all because the home 
product is still dirt cheap, with no 
uniform price. Never in the his- 
tory of the Southern field were 
prospects brighter, but producers 
have had little besides hopes for 
so long that a change would be 
welcomed. 

The failure of the attempted 
combine has left the market in a 
very unsatisfactory condition, with 
the price little better than several 
months ago. The worst of it is 
there is plenty ot oil on hand. 

In the field last week oil sold at 
50 to 60 cents a barrel at the 
tanks, most of the sales being 
made at or near the latter figure. 
Under contracts Mrs. Summers de- 
livered oil at the rate of 40,000 
barrels a month, and she is author- 
ity for the statement that it netted 
the producers betweeu 60 and 65 
cents a barrel. 

The Storage and Transportation 
company entered the field Friday, 
losing contracts with several pro- 
ducers on that date for the handl- 
ing of their output. Though not 
officially stated, it is undertsood 
that the storage company is not 
making as satisfactory progress in 
the signing up with local well 
owners as that corporation had 



hoped when it threw down the 
local producers' association. Mauy 
of the producers at that time w-ere 
under the impression that "there 
was something doing" and have 
in a measure held aloof waiting 
"to see how tilings would come 
out." This attitude has not helped 
matters, but the storage company 
expects to swell the list before the 
close of the ensuing week 

Refinery schemes are still dis- 
cussed, and prospects are that be- 
fore the end of the month one or 
more will have taken definite 
shape. Major George Easton is 
now in New York in the interest 
of the new refinery he is fostering. 
If built on plans approved by his 
associates it will have a capacity 
of at least 25,000 barrels a month. 

Meantime work goes merrily on 
in the field. 

Prospect work is being done by 
Chief of Police Elton near the 
intersection of Lakeshore boule- 
vard and West State street. The 
well being drilled is outside of the 
proven belt, but he has hope of 
opening considerable new terri- 
tory by finding oil there. If 
necessary the hole will be made 
1200 feet deep. It is now 600 
feet deep. 

Ex-Governor Hogg, of Texas, is 
quoted by the New York Com- 
mercial as saying that it is mighty 
hard to tell the difference between 
a financier, a capitalist and an ad- 
venturer in these oil gushing 
times. 



For a Few Days Longer Only Can Our Stock Be Obtained at 

20c 20c 20c 



3* 






We own land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have just secured 

6000 ACRES 6000 ACRES 

of land that produces untold quantities of asphalt 
near Sargents Station. 



We are now erecting our refinery for refining the 
asphaltum. We have concluded contracts for the 
sale of all our asphalt at a figure which will enable 
us to pay dividends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract carload lots for crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

As soon as we commence shipping which will be 
in a very few days our stock will advance to 50 cents. 

If you want to invest in the stock of a company 
that will surely more than double in value almost at 
once call or write to the 






STANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY 

473=476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 



in 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



$100,000 PER ACRE. 

That is What Beaumont Land is 
Held At. 

One year ago on the 27th of the 
present month drilling was started 
on the famous Lucas gusher. 
Just one year to the day the larg- 
est oil carrying vessel in the world 
left Philadelphia for Port Arthur 
to take on the product of the well 
for the European market. Tak- 
ing a retrospective view of the 
situation anyone familiar with the 
field operations stand in awe of 
the many millions invested in the 
field. The 200 acres of land on 
the defined hill would bring $20,- 
000,000 at the generally accepted 
market price of $100,000 per acre. 
While there is no way of accur- 
ately estimating what amount has 
been put in wells, pipe lines, and 
storage tanks, that, too, would 
run up into millions. 

The steamship on her way to 
port Arthur carries 60,000 barrels, 
or over two and one half million 
gallons. She is owned by the 
Shell Trading and Transportation 
company of London, and will be 
loaded by the J. M. Guffey Pe- 
troleum company from their re- 
finery at Port Arthur. The oil is 
intended for fuel purposes, hav- 
ing only the objectionable in- 
gredients removed. Mr. Mudcroft 
Smyth, who represents the Shell 
company at Port Arthur, stated 



this morning that the " Cordine" 
was the largest oil carrying vessel 
in the world and was expected to 
make the trip in about eight days 

While the reports of enormous 
European sales have been inter- 
esting and received a great deal 
of attention from the public, there 
is nothing like seeing steamers 
coming over after the oil. 

The Cordine will be followed 
by other vessels on the same mis- 
sion. 



Los Angeles Stocks. 

Comparative dullness character- 
ized the market on the Los An- 
geles Stock Exchange during the 
last week of October. This dull- 
ness is not due so much to the 
want of buying orders as it is to 
the fact that oil stock purchasers 
are placing their orders on the 
basis of some time ago, whereas 
the present holders of such securi- 
ties, having a better hope of the 
petroleum situation, refuse to part 
with their stocks at old-time rates. 
The market has not yet reached 
that point of adjustment where 
buyer and seller can meet, hence 
the limited amount of stock that 
changed hands during the past 
week. 

Reed Crude stock fell off half a 
point, several thousand shares go- 
ing over the board at 33^ cents. 
This proved to be the minimum 
figure, however, and the quotation 



rallied later to 34^c bid, 34^c 
asked. Senator has showed a trifle 
of weakness of late, the closing 
bids and offers last Saturday being 
$1.00 to $1.15. The bids on Wil 
son Oil company's stock are grad- 
ually advancing, although none 
may be had at the figures now 
offered. The same may be said of 
Fullerton Consolidated, which has 
failed to show itself on the board, 
although bid up to 42 cents, an 
advance of nearly ten points over 
former quotations. The continued 
weakneps in Westlake is still ap- 
parent and the figures still stand 
424c bid and 6 cents asked, with 
no trading. Stronger offers have 
been made to secure Southern 
Consolidated than in some time 
past, but no trading resulted. 

A better demand for copper 
stocks continues to be manifest 
and the r/rices of several such 
securities listed on the Exchange 
are gradually advancing. Of the 
gold stocks, Butte Lode has been 
the favorite trader and has sold as 
high as $31.00 within the week, 
the present asking price being 
$40.00. A limited amount of trad- 
ing had been registered among 
the bank stocks, State Bank and 
Trust Company being the most 
active, although some active bid- 
ing has been done for Farmers 
and Merchants. There are no 
changes of importance to record 
among 
ties. 



the miscellaneous securi- 



May be Paraffine Oil. 

Florence, Arizona, and vicinity 
is somewhat agitated over discov- 
eries indicative of the presence of 
oil with a paraffine base. 

The find was made in the Sabine 
canyon and a test was made with 
th? rock taken from the surface. 
Superficially the rock appeared to 
be destitute of oil, but when 
washed and submitted to acid 
treatment it is claimed that a pre- 
cipitate of paraffin was obtained. 
Other tests were made with rock 
obtained at the depths with more 
gratifying results. 

Companies to dtvelop the pros- 
pective oil territory are being or- 
ganized in Florence and one rig 
is already up. 



Gas From Oil. 

A public experiment was made 
at the Tulare County Fair, held 
last week at Hanford, to show 
that acetylene gas can be made 
from crude petroleum. 

Acetylene gas has passed into 
very common use in many parts 
of the world, on account of being 
such an effective and cheap illum- 
inant. It is generated from a com- 
bination of coke, lime and water, 
and is now stated that a chemi 
cally identical gas may be ob- 
tained by combining crude oil, 
lime and water. It has been esti- 
mated that a cubic foot of crude 
oil will produce theoretically 1500 
feet of acetylene gas, though in 
practical working this amount is 
reduced to 1000 feet. . 



ti »w.<«-i 



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WE HAVE 



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KERR'S REPORTS 

OIL COMPANY DIAGNOSIS 

The only systematized oil rating and reporting agency in the world. 



Field Investigators, 
Credit Examiners, 
Abstract Searchers, 



IN WESTERN AND SOUTHERN OIL FIELDS. 



We have no interest or official connection with 
oil companies. 

" WE ALWAYS KNOW." 

FEES AND CHARGES: A simple, general char- 
acter report, $2.00; details cost more. Our Monthly 
Investment tables with key giving estimates on oil 
companies, West and South, $25.00 for six months, 
under certain conditions free; 3,000 companies listed. 
Send address and claims of the oil company inquired 
for. 

We make credit examinations the same as the 
mercantile agencies. We find the cash values, esti- 
mate land values and oil property and assets. Our 
abstract searchers are the best known and most com- 
petent firms in California and Texas. 

Our field investigators are men who make maps, 
men who drill wells and men hired by this office who 
actually investigate. 



Competent, unbiased, commercial oil reports re- 
quire skill, money and brains. Free oil advice is 
nearly always worthless, or merits suspicion. In- 
vestors must not be lead astray by a few oil jackal 
editors who ambuscade the unwary by giving free 
information in an " Information column," the editor 
getting a "rake off" for his services. 

We give authentic field maps constantly corrected 
and brought down to date by competent field men. 
We sell commercial information on oil pnigress, pro- 
duction, charters, by-laws, prices, etc., at one-tenth 
of what it would cost you to investigate. We give 
the legal history of a company, if stock is assessable, 
the validity of leases, the amount of royalties, the 
conditions of transportation, prices and competition. 

We tell you how to buy. 

We tell you when to buy. 

We tell you where to buy. 

We tell you when to sell. 

We keep the investor constantlv posted on the 
progress of his deal. SEND FOR PROSPECTUS. 



4 ^fc^te^rfctWfc^-fe^j-feH 



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KERR'S REPORTS 

Mills Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



. Oil Rl 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 

Recent Developments In Oil In Various Parts 
of the 3tate. 



CONTRA COSTA. 

The j baa 

eded in pushing to one ride the bit 

lost in the hole a few week- ago. The 
well is down alout 600 feet. 

The National Pnramnc Oil company 
has their well down nearly 900 feet. 
The drill is nuw in a soft formation ol 
blue shale, which is full of oil and gas 
The drill is making an average of 
twenty feet a day with one shift. 

A new company of which Fred S 
Vogau is the manager will continue at 
.■nee on the old well of the Grand Pacific 
company, which is down now in the 
neighborhood of ofeet. It is located 
near Lafayette I the wells of the 

llerkeley Crude uipany and the 

National Paraffin pany. 

KRh;>.\ T 0. 

Following is the latest news from Coa- 
linga, according to the Derrick: 

Mercantile No. 1 is progressing slowly. 

Producers and Consumers is making 
hole. 

The Echo well in Warthan canyon is 
still drilling. 

Maine State No. 3 has been sand- 
pumping this week. 

Caribou is putting wells deeper, and 
is at pre-ent working on No. 1. 

The Fresno-San Francisco started 
spudding its No. 1 last Wednesday. 

The Zenith is waiting for drive-pipe 
which is expected in a few days. 

The Philadelphia-San Francisco No. 1 
is down three hundred feet or more. 

The Investment will start drilling as 
soon as rig and machinery can be put in 
place. 

A rig was burned on section 28 last 
week over a producing well, and a new 
rig is now being erected to replace it. 

The Mt. Hamilton company intends to 
do considerable work and will start three 
strings of tools as soon as No. 1 is com- 
pleted. 

While the Santa Clara has stopped 
drilling and sold rig and tools, Superin- 
tendent Campbell says this company 
has not abandoned this field altogether. 

Among the companies expected to 
start the drill within the next few weeks 
are the Blue Diamond, St. Paul, Mount 
Jack, Esperanza and Investment. 

The Mount Jack will move rig from 
present location to a point one quarter of 
a mile north of the Sauer Dough well 
and will probably begin drilling within 
the next thirty days. 

Another string of tools was started 
by the California Oil Fields (Lmtd) last 
Wednesday on No. 5 of section 27. This 
company is now operating four strings. 
Three are running tower and one is do- 
ing daylight work only. 

We were informed three weeks ago by 
the secretary of the Blue Diamond Oil 
company that this company would re- 
sume operations in a week or ten days, 
but have heard nothing further. We 
hope however to be able to inform the 
public in next issue of the Derrick that 
this company is again at work. 

The presence of a number of strangers 
in town this week, who are looking after 
oil propositions, reminds us a little of 
last winter. There has also been a num- 
ber of men here this week from neigh- 
boring towns who already have oil in- 



cnong these were |ono 

rt, Wm. Newport, w. W. Parlin 
and George Shores, who are the direc- 
tors of the Esperanza 1 til com p 

HOMBOLDT. 

San Francisco capitalists have had 

their eye on Humboldt county oil Seldfl 
for h long time past. Their success in 
the interior and southern portions ol 
the state has given them great faith in 
the oil belt, which apparently t«averses 
the state from end to end. 

According to the Humboldt Times, O. 
Von Gerzabek, a ma a well versed in 
geological knowledge and an ezpi 
proven ability, has been quietly going 
over the ground for the past two weeks. 
He secured from 11. L. Ford a lease ol 
two thousand acres in the southern end 
of the county with the understanding 
that active operations will commence in 
sixty days. Capitalists of San Francisco 
are behind Mr. Von Gerzabek, men who 
have operated largely in the develop- 
ment of oil in this state and their coming 
here means much for Humboldt county. 

KERN. 
The Standard is grading for its third 
shipment of tanks. 

Blackjack has announced its intention 
of drilling two new wells. 

The Sea Breeze is ready to perforate 
and it is thought will make a showing. 

Superior No. 1 is steadily flowing. 
Hole No. 3 is drilling. 

The Irma, holding a lease from the 
Toltec, is spudding in on its first hole. 

Jacolitas has about completed its No. 
2. The well bids fair to be a moderate 
producer. 

Seven strings of tools are working on 
the holdings of the 11. F. brooks com- 
panies. 

The Orient has plugged its casing and 
is finishing up the hole of its second 
well. 

The Standard is putting in a new 
pumping plant to be used in furnishing 
water for domestic purposes. 

The Barton Sunset has got a shoe 
stuck in , its hole. The well will be 
cleaned out and sunk to a greater depth. 

The Wolverine, 4, 29-2S, has two wells 
on the pump. The company is con- 
templating sinking another hole the last 
of the month. 

The Potomac has completed its sixth 
well in the Kern field and is now placing 
the rig for No. 7. The company is not 
pumping its wells. 

The York Syndicate well, on 8, 29-28, 
is down 660 feet. The company ex- 
pects to enter the lower sands before the 
casing has been lowered 100 feet more. 

The Queen, Section 13, 11-24, is still 
having its periods of spouting several 
feet above the casing. The well has 
every indication of being a valuable pro- 
ducer 

The Potomac was the first company in 
the field to utilize compressed air for 
pumping, and has found that such 
method gives a one-third better result at 
five-eighths less expense. 

The Wizard, south of the river, is 
again in trouble over the water. They 
are thinking seriously of a hydraulic rig 
in order to complete their well to the 
2000 feet. 

The Peerless expects to complete two 
more wells this week. Their first wells 



up then daily output, 

men! tanks 
I will soon be comp 

The Giant well in McKH trick on Sal 
threw the feet above 

the top of the derrick and with 
enough to loosen the crown block and 

•battel the derrick timbers. Tin 
1 aught and stored iii sump 

Hurt ''rude, operating on section 36, 

has a (lowing well, which pro 

dines .111 an average of 150 barrels of oil 

dally. This well was taken from the 

pomp about two weeks ago and has 

since been spouting over the top of the 

easing into ti sump hole. 

The Oil I. and company is having a 
hard time in trying to compute the well 
of the Diamond Oil company in McKil 

trick. Heaving Sand is so troublesome 
that no progress can be made. The 
com pan) will at once change from a 
standard toa hydraulic rig. 

|. A. Hill, who for some time has been 
connected with J. 15. Hill, the oil broker, 
has been appointed manager of the 
Chico Oil Company, operating in Kern 
County, and will now have his per- 
manent headquarters at Sunset. Mr. 
Hill is a large owner of stock in the 
company. 

Well No. 1 of the (Jueeu Oil company, 
located at Suuset City, on section 13, 
11-24, uas come in as a gusher, at a depth 
of 725 feet. The station of the Suuset 
railroad is located on the Queen's prop- 
erty and thus reduces the cost of loading 
its oil to a minimum, as oil will flow into 
the car tanks by gravity. 

During the boring of the Century well 
the drill went through a petrified log 
1265 feet below the surface. The wood 
was imbedded in oil sand. The pres- 
ence of the petrified wood is not un- 
known in borings, ; s the strata in this 
county are similar to those uear Coa- 
linga. namely, in the miocene tertiary, 
which abounds in petrified wood. 

The Western Oil and Development 
company, drilling on section ri, 31-24, is 
exploring a new district which has been 
named the Wagont district. This field 
js situated near Buena Vista lake, about 
six miles north of Midway, twelve miles 
from McKittrick and sixteen miles from 
Sunset. This company is now down 600 
feet and has encountered a great deal of 
gas. 

The Sphiux, commonly known as the 
Buntiug well, on section 7, 30-22, was 
perforated ou Wednesday and the oil 
rose 400 feet in the casing. This well 
is ii3ofeet deep and brings in quite a 
lot of new territory. The Columbia on 
the southwest of the same section has 
its material on the ground and will begin 
drilling as soou as the rig is in place. 

On section 5, 29-2S, in Kern Kiver, the 
Mercedes Oil company has just com- 
pleted two wells that are averaging 250 
barrels a day on the beam. Two more 
wells are on the same tract, and it is an- 
nounced the company has mapped out 
much new work. The holdings are in a 
very choice locality and it is only a mat- 
ter of drilling a few hundred feet to se- 
cure a thrifty well. 

The McKittrick company has the dis 
tinction of having the deepest well in 
the county, the drill now being over 1700 
feet with the casing swinging easily and 
following the hole -without trouble. 
Several successive strata of oil sand have 
been penetrated, but the company is de- 
termined to go as deep as possible in the 
hope of striking the lighter oil which is 
supposed to underlie. 

The San Joaquin Company shipped 
about 350 carloads of oil from Kern Riv- 
er last mouth. The company was one 
of the many hampered by the car short- 
age. Workmen are repairing its large 
redwood pipe liue and wil' soon have it 



lank 
Unit the 

he cleaned. 

The McWhorter refinery En Kern is 
Eng to enlarge Its capacity. The 

refinery now has .1 capacity of OllT) 

forty-five barrels per day, but this 
amount is to be increased to 600 barrels 
by the first of the year. The plans Call 
for two 300 -barrel stills. There is some 
troubli land on which the re- 

finer) is located, but this 

matter is adjusted work will commence. 

The drilling record was broken in the 
atrrn Uiver field last Saturday night, 

when the Potomac < »il company brought 
in No. .'7 on the sixteenth da) aftei the 
drill first dropped, at a depth of 870 feet, 

and though the company thought it had 
a blanket formation there must have 
dip in the sand as it thickened 
out in marked contrast with the other 
wciu belonging to this same organiza- 
tion. 

Superintendent Moore of the Prosper- 
ity States that his com pan} has by 110 
means abandoned the idea of obtaining 
oil in paying quantities on its holdings, 
Section 20, 28 28. The hole which was 
drilled to a depth of 1575 feet was sunk 
as a test hole, the upper strata of oil 
sand being penetrated without regard to 
their quality. Mr. Moore says his com- 
pany will undoubtedly sink another hole 
in the near future, and he is positive that 
at least a seventy-five barrel well will be 
obtained. 

LOS ANGELES. 

The following is the latest from the 
Whittier field, according to the News; 
The Murphy Oil company has begun 

spudding on No. 7. 

The North Whittiei Oil company's 
No. 2 is approaching 1300 feet but pro- 
gress is slow. 

The East Whittiei company's No. 2 is 
down over 1400 feet with three strings of 
casing in the hole. 

The Whittier-Fillmore well on the 
Tubbs-Evaus tract is down over 1000 
feet and the hole is in excellent sh ipe. 

The Whittier Oil and Development 
company's well is down nearly 1200 feet. 
The bailer is bringing up small quanti- 
ties of oil. 

The Frampton Brothers have No. 5 
for the Whittier Crude Oil company 
down over 1400 feet. Good progress is 
also being made in the deepening of 
No. I. 

The Home Oil company is experienc- 
ing considerable difficulty with No. 13 
but is making excellent progress on the 
deepening of No. io which is down over 
sixteen feet. 

Contractor Richard McConnell, who 
is putting down Nos. 31 and 33 for the 
Central Oil company, has begun spud- 
ding on the well he is to drill for the 
Union Oil company on the Sansenina 
ranch. This hole will be cased at the 
start with thirteen inch drive pipe, 
SANTA CRUZ. 

The Watson ville Oil Company is 
going to put down one or more trial 
wells at a point on the Sargent ranch 
where oil sand appears at the surface, 
and where a shallow well is flowing oil. 
This shallow well is down 160 feet, and 
was abandoned because of difficulty in 
going through a deposit of asphalt. The 
company has a process to overcome it, 
and it is expected that a good flow of oil 
will be obtained. 

The oil boom has recommenced. Sev- 
eral oil leases were filed to-day in 
the office of the Recorder. The leases 
are all to E. W. Biddle of Sonoma 
county, who assigned them all to the 
North American Crude Oil Company 
of Arizona, with the principal place 
of business in Kansas City, Mo. The 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



land leaser! is all in the Santa Cruz 
mountains, near Loma Prieta moun- 
tain. E. E. Meyer leases tracts of 
325 acres and of 150 acres; Clara A. 
Wright, 200 acres; George C. Wilson, 
eighteen acres and H. C. Morrell, 1200 
acres. — Santa Cruz Surf. 

SANTA BARBARA. 

The Union Sugar company received 
the first consignment of Western Union 
oil on Tuesday and will from now on 
consume the ; home product. The ship- 
ment consisted of two carloads. The oil 
has been contracted for at 80 cents per 
barrel, and as it is of better grade than 
the Bakersfield product, and does not in- 
volve any exorbitant freight rates the 
factory should profit by the change. 
The oil is being transported by the 
Pacific Coast Railway company, which 
has adopted a series of new tank cars. 

TEHAMA. 
The latest advices from the Corning 
oil well state that the drill during the 
past few days has been working in ex- 
ceedingly hard formation. Only ten or 
twelve inches were inac'e last Friday. 
The drill is now down 1955 feet. 

VENTURA. 
The Union Consolidated Oil company, 
operating in the Big Sespe, lost rig No. 
2 by fire. In some way or other that is 
not explained the fire was started, and 
the rig was burned to the ground. 

The Windsor Oil company operating 
near Santa Paula, has closed down for 
a time, and it is reported will let the 
work out on contract. 

KERN. 
The Suuset Coast, on 25, 32-23, in 
Midway, has struck rich oil sand at 1100 
feet. 



The Nineteen Oil company, on 19, 
28, struck oil last week at 1000 feet. 



28- 



Diablo has put up two new 



The Mt. 
derricks. 

The Orient is building eight 1200 bar- 
rel wooden tanks. 

The Jackalitas has put well No. 2 in 
the sand, and is getting ready to per- 
forate. 

The Petroleum Center, on section 24, 
28-27, aas completed well No. 5. 

The Nevada company is drilling well 
No. 8, and is also building a 10,000 bar- 
rel reservoir. 

The rig and derrick which were used 
in drilling the Sphinx well, section 7, in 
McKittrick district, caught fire last Sun- 
day afternoon and was burned to the 
ground. The loss is estimated at I2500. 



IN THE PAJARO. 



proved futile, were made to over- 
come the gas and dig the well 
deeper. 

While the company has not 
struck oil, there is no question 
but what it has one of the biggest 
gas wells in the State. In fact it 
has gas to burn. 

Yesterday afternoon a Register 
reporter accompanied Frank Gaf- 
fey, the secretary of the Watson- 
ville Coast Oil Company, to the 
well, and was surprised at the im- 
mense volume of gas arising from 
the hole. It could be seen com- 
ing out of the casing like fog, and 
upon a light being applied to it, 
the gas readily ignited and in an 
instant a volume of flame eight 
inches in diameter blazed straight 
into the air to a height of between 
sixty and seventy feet. 

It was a beautiful sight. The 
gas burned steadily for several 
seconds until the flame was extin- 
guished, to prevent it from burn- 
ing the derrick. 

Mr. Berry the driller, who has 
had considerable experience in 
the gas regions of Ohio, says he is 
satisfied that there is gas enough 
in the well, if properly handled, 
to supply Watsonville with fuel 
and light. 

The company started in to bore 
for oil, and the pressure of gas in 
such an immense quantity indi- 
cates that they will strike it. 

Speaking of oil, a report reached 
town yesterday that the Crescent 
Company, which is boring on the 
Sargent tract, has really struck 
oil in paying quantities. It is 
stated that fifty barrels of oil were 
pumped out of the well on Thurs- 
day. If the report is true it will 
be a good thing for the Crescent 
people and an equally good thing 
for Watsonville. 



the Pacific Coast Oil company has 
its tanks. 

General Manager John Baker 
and an ample corps of assistants 
are located on the company's hold- 
ings. While not inclined to talk 
at length, Mr. Baker stated that 
the refinery would be built at 
once, but would not give any data 
regarding its capacity or the nurn 
ber of tanks to be erected. He 
said that the refinery would manu- 
facture only asphaltum. 

Not long ago it was averred that 
the Standard Oil company's re- 
finery at Point Richmond would 
not utilize the asphaltum as a 
product, but would convert it into 
a coke. That would give the com- 
pany no control of the asphaltum 
market; and noi? the Union is 
about to build a refinery and will 
not make anything but asphaltum. 
This preservation of the business 
equilibrium is being qu ted as an- 
other proof that there is strong 
affiliation between the two cor- 
porations, at least. But the ques- 
tion next presents itself, what will 
the Union do with the distillates 
which remain after the asphaltum 
is extracted? 



Oil Developments in This Beau- 
tiful Valley. 

1'he oil properties in this valley 
are still in the promising stage- 
The indications are excellent and 
the work of developing the sev- 
eral oil wells has been and is still 
being prosecuted with intelligent 
energy. The property of the 
Watsonville Coast Oil Company is 
no exception to the rule. 

Several weeks ago the drillers, 
while boring the company's first 
well in the Gaffey district, struck 
a heavy flow of gas at a depth of 
about 700 feet. Operations were 
suspended and water was turned 
into the hole, in the hope of 
drowning out the gas. When 
work was resumed about a week 
ago it was fcund that the pressure 
of the gas was as strong as ever 
and efforts, which have so far 



The Union's Refinery. 

A Bakersfield telegram dated 
November 1st says: 

The Union Oil company has 
started to build a refinery on its 
holdings on section 8, 29-28, in the 
Kern River fields. The survey 
for the buildings has been made. 
This step on the part of that com- 
pany has set the oil men to think- 
ing. It was stated some time ago 
that this company was controlled 
largely by the Standard Oil com- 
pany, but this report was firmly 
denied by the former company. 
Nevertheless a number of the pro- 
ducers are of the opinion that the 
latter corporation is to a large ex- 
tent controlling the former, and 
for reasons that appear in some 
measure to receive confirmation 
by this new departure. 

The Union Oil company has at 
present in the Kern River fields 
two 35,000-barrel steel tanks and 
a set of loading racks. Surveys 
are at present being made for an 
increase in tankage, and judging 
from the appearance of stakes 
which are scattered over the 
ground, a few months will see a 
close rival to Pacific City, where 



The Combine. 

Last week the Associated Oil 
Company elected the following 
officers: C. A. Canfield, president; 
W. G. Kerckhoff, vice-president; 
W. A. Jacobs, first vice-president; 
O. Scribner, secretary; Burton E. 
Green, treasurer; directors, Henry 
Ach, W. F. Chandler, C. A. Can- 
field, W. G. Kerckhoff, B. F. 
Brooks, B. E. Green, H. H. Blood, 
M. J. Layniance, W. A. Jacobs, 
O. Scribner, and W. S. I'orter. 

From this it looks as if those 
chiefly interested in the combine 
were going ahead in spite of many 
discouragements. 

There is no doubt but that the 
staying out of so many companies, 
large and small, will greatly hurt 
the chances of success. It is well- 
known that the Peerless, San Joa- 
quin, Kern River, Monte Cristo 
and other large companies of 
equal caliber will not or can not 
join the combine, while the num- 
ber of small companies which do 
not propose to be frozen out of 
existence is surprisingly large. 

Yet the combine is going ahead 
in spite of all. How long it will 
continue to stagger along under 
the load of opposition it is carry- 
ing no one can say. It is freely 
prophesied on the Exchange the 
end is near, and the sooner it 
comes the better for the oil busi- 
ness. 



This does not include the hun- 
dreds of barrels which the Pacific 
Coast Oil company purchased to 
fill its tanks. Nor does it include 
the many barrels used in oiling 
the roads in this county, nor the 
oil consumed in heating boilers 
for steam engines throughout the 
districts. The output of the Sun- 
set fields is not included in this 
estimate either, so that 3000 cars 
can be placed as a safe aggregate 
of the total production of the 
Kern county fields. 

To Drill Near Newman. 

Says the Newman Index: A 
complete oil boring rig was un- 
loaded from the cars here last week, 
and it will soon be in operation in 
the foothills west of town. The 
parties owning it have ample 
capital, are not selling any stock, 
but have bonded large tracts of 
land in this vicinity and are going 
to find out whether or not there is 
oil here. It has taken both' time 
and money from some of our citi- 
zens to get these people interested 
here, and we hope for the benefit 
of the town of Newman and the 
West Side in general that oil will 
be found in paying quantities 
here. If it is not, Judge Smith, 
Asa V. Mendenhall and the Index 
editor will not have to reproach 
themselves with not hustling to 
give it a thorough trial. 



Oil in Montana. 

A dispatch from Butte, dated 
November 5th says: 

Considerable ' excitement pre- 
vails on the river from Great Falls 
to Dell over the strike made in 
the newly located oil lands. Four 
thousand acres have been taken 
up in the past three days on and 
about what is known as the Sheep 
Creek. The ground is covered 
with lignite coal of an excellent 
quality and oil seepage and gas 
exudations. Several thousand 
acres of oil-bearing land was lo- 
cated today on Horse prairie. It 
is thought the entire portion of 
the country from Dillon to the 
foot of the main range of the 
Rockies is one vast oil field. 



Considering the slovenly way 
in which they are equipped, the 
wonder is not so much that many 
wells pump but little oil as that 
they pump any at all. 



Kern's October Output. 

A dispatch from Bakersfield on 
November 1st, states: There were 
2200 cars of oil brought in from 
the Kern River fields during the 
past month. Four hundred more 
were brought from McKittrick. 
This makes a total of 2600 cars of 
oil, at an average of 150 barrels to 
a car, or 390.000 barrels of oil. 



The Standard has 'fourteen big 
oil tanks completed at Bakersfield 
and has six more in process of 
construction. There will be sixty- 
five in all. 



The Southern Pacific is en- 
deavoring to obtain more cars to 
meet the increased demand for oil. 



There is still room for improve- 
ment in the starting of gas en- 
gines. 



New Boston Oil Well Casing 

near Hanford, for sale under value; 300 
feet of gH and Soo feet of 7%, and other 
goods. Address, P. O., Box 117, Visalia, 
California. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



ANOTHER ROAD. 



Rumor of Another Railroad I rom 
Point Rlchm nil. 

There are all kinds of rumors 
afloat concern lilroads to 

be built, with Oakland as a ter- 
minus. 

The Pleasanton Thnes mentions 
the fact that rights of way were 
secured some time since as far as 
Dublin, in this valley, for a rail- 
road which is supposed to be a 
continuation of the old California 
and Nevada road, which although 
it consists only of a ri^ht of way 
and two streaks of rust, has always 
! considered valuable to rail- 
road men on account of the for- 
mer consideration, and has been 
the subject of more scheming than 
some of the big trunk lines. The 
Oakland Enquirer recently pub- 
lished another rumor concerning 
this little road which would re- 
move it from our immediate local- 
ity but near enough to be interest- 
ing: 

"The old California and Nevada 
Railroad, which runs between 
Bryant, in Contra Costa county, 
and Emeryville, is the subject of 
a pretty well-founded rumor that 
large railroad interests are negoti- 
ating with a view to purchasing 
the line and righls of "ay, to 
make it part of another system. 
This latest story is in connection 
with the plans of the promoters of 
the new California Midland Rail- 
road Company, which is project- 
ing a line from a distant corner of 
Madera county, tapping :i moun- 
tain of rich iron ore, up to Point 
Richmond, where, report has it, a 
million dollar smelter is to be 
erected. 

"Two days ago parties repre- 
senting the California Midland 
road came to Oakland with the 
view of looking up details con- 
cerning the rights of way held by 
California and Nevada. A consid- 
erable portion of the latter road 
lies over rights of way which have 
never been legally acquired by 
deed, so the whole road is in 
somewhat of a complicated condi- 
tion respecting its property rights. 
"Designing to effect an entrance 
to Point Richmond, it is under- 
stood that the projectors of the 
new California Midland, in case 
they may acquire the California 
and Nevada, will bring their road 
up through the San Joaquin val- 
ley to Tracy and then run up the 
Marsh canvon to Walnut creek, 
thence to Lafayette, thence 
through a tunnel 750 feet long, 
wbich must be constructed 
through Charles Hill, aud from 
there to Bryant, the present ter- 
minus of the railway; from Bry- 
ant to the Davis ranch, near San 
Pablo, where a cutoff would be 
made to Point Richmond, a dis- 
tance of sixteen miles. 

"In case the rights of way of 
this line are acquired by the 
newly projected company the en- 
tire roadway would have to be re- 
built, lor the present roadway is 



in no condition to be subjected to 
the heavy tratlic that won! 

it if shipments of iron ore 
were made from the southern pari 

of the State, 

"Rumor has ■ number of times 
connected this little railroad with 
various large concerns, and one 
time it was thought that the San- 
ta Fe intended to acquire the line, 
but nothing in this direction ap- 
parently has been done by the 
Santa Fe people since they got a 
terminal at Point Richmond, aud 
it is presumed that the bondhold- 
ers would welcome a sale of the 
road to any one." 



Producers' Oil Exchange 

The following > 
the Produi ^e in the 

ons held for the week ending 



Refinery at Sar£ents. 

The president of Standard Rock 
Oil Company reports that all the 
arrangements were completed this 
week for the new refinery enter- 
prise at Sargents Station, where 
are located some of the largest and 
best beds of asphalt on the coast. 

On Wednesday the superin- 
tendent left for the field, and the 
work of erecting buildings and 
putting in the foundations for the 
refining kettles will begin at once. 
The company will soon begin 
shipping asphalt in carload lots. 
The company has a contract with 
one of the largest paving com- 
panies in the city and will make a 
profit of over $g on every ton 
sent to the city. 

The amount of production as 
yet cannot be estimated but will 
be several carloads a week of the 
refined product. 

The crude asphaltum will also 
be shipped. 

This enterprise will make the 
Standaid Rock Oil Company one 
of the best dividend-paying com- 
panies in the state. 

The stock is now offered at 20 
cents a share, but in ten days will 
be advanced to 50 cents. 

R. C. McPherson, the well- 
known oil operator, drilled a well 
on this territory in '79. He was 
after a light oil, but struck an im- 
mense flow of liquid asphalt, equal 
to several hundred barrels a day. 



Sands worth measuring at all 
are worth measuring correctly. 



Pacific Coast Undenv riling Company 

Incorporate companies; furnish 
everything complete. 

Sell interest -bearing Gold Bonds. 

Underwrite stocks. 

Buy and sell Oil Lands. 

Handle all kinds of mining 
properties. 

Information furnished investors 
regarding Pacific Coast Corpora- 
tions. Address, 

Main Office, 507-8-9 Parrott Bldg., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Notice to Stockholders. 

The stockholders of the Flashlight Oil 
Company are hereby noti6ed that the 
annual meeting of the Flashlight Oil 
company will be held at the office of the 
company, room 23, Columbian Building, 
Sau Francisco, on Wednesday, November 
13, laor, at 2 o'clock, P. M-, for the pur- 
pose of electing a Boaid of Directors for 
the ensuing year, and for the transaction 
of such other business as may arise. 

F. R. Turton, Secy. 






CAl 



IS at 



250 at 



I 10. 

1 t«3. 



11 \\ CITY. 





90 00 



PORNIA STANDARD. 

-'3 

CARIJ 



70 

'•5 

75 

POUR oil. 
45 



GIANT. 



U 
35 



17 5° 



1 (S 00 

8S <« 

3.SO "O 



IANFORD PRESNO KERN ui\ BR. 






-'3" at 
500 at 
350 at 



08 

HOME oil,. 

3 35 

3 40 

3 30 

HANFORD. 



5 at 102 00 

1 at 105 00 

(. ;it 103 00 

I at 104 00 

I at 10600 

INDF.PF.NDENCF.. 



1000 at 
150 at 



4300 at 
600 at 
roo at 
600 at 



4500 at 
400) at 
2200 at 
2000 at 



08 

09 

JUNCTION. 

25 

26 

27 

28 



LION. 



09. 
12 . 

08. 



S37 50 
1700 00 
1 155 00 



510 00 
105 00 
618 00 
104 00 
424 CO 



80 00 
•3 50 



1075 00 

156 00 

27 00 

168 00 



405 00 
480 00 
242 00 
200 00 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Crane Co. 

H. T. LALLY, Manager 

23-25 FIRST ST. ) 

24 FREMONT ST. j 

San Francisco, Cal 



monte cristo. 

150 at 1 70 



255 00 
83 75 



50 at 1 67J4 

MONARCH OF ARIZONA. 

i20o(B6o)at 23 27600 

400 at 22 SS 00 

600 at 23 138 00 

OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 

700 at 25 



175 00 



OCCIDENTAL. 



100 at 

r6oo at 

100 at 



34 

33 

31 

PEERLESS. 

3S0 at 5 00 

Ioo(Bgo)at 5 50 

30 at 5 I2j£ 

PETROLEUM CENTER. 

1800 at 09 

4850 at 08 

15520 at 07 

iooo( B9o)at 09 

rooo( Bgojat 08 

REED CRUDE 

36 

35 

34 

STERLING. 

100 at r 27 J£ 



100 at 

2175 at 

100 at 



34 00 

52S 00 

31 00 



1 900 00 
550 00 
153 75 



r62 00 

33> s 00 

1086 40 

90 00 

80 00 



36 00 

761 25 

34 00 



127 50 



SAN JOAQUIN. 

150 at 7 50 

SOVEREIGN. 

roo at 25 

TOLTFC. 



400 at 35 . 



TWENTY-EIGHT 



50 at r 50 . 
00 at r 60. 
to at r 65. 



IT25 00 



23 00 



140 00 



73 00 

1 120 00 

16 50 



Shares 57,417 



Amount 119,364 15 



WANTED. 

Some party baring well rig capable of 
boring 500 to 1200 feet to bore one or two 
wells in Contra Costa county, California, 
Work to commence about January 12, 
1902. For furtber detail address 41, 
Hammond Bldg.. Lietroit, Michigan. 



AMERICAN, 

STEEL AND WI 



Pacific Works 

The only Wire Rope Factory on 
the Pacific Coast. 



We make 

Wire Ropes, Cable and Hawsers 

For all purposes and with 
every possible combination 
of Wires, steel and iron, 
galvanized or plain. 



♦ 
□ 
□ 



♦S*^ 



Wire Ropes 
Of all Kinds 
For Oil Well 
Purposes 

And all fixtures and appliances 
for the use of Wire Rope 



Send your orders to 

American Steel&Wire Co. 

LOS ANGELES— No. 206 North 

Los Angeles St. 
SAN FRANCISCO— No. 8 6k 10 

Pine St. 



D 

D 



12 



pacific oil Reporter. 



ASTHMA CURE FREE 

Asthmalene Brings Instant Belief and Permanent 
Cure in All Cases 

SENT ABSOLUTELY FREE ON RECEIPT OF POSTAL 

WRITE YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS PLAINLY 



CHAINED 

FOR TEN 
YEARS 




There is nothing like Asthmalene. It 
brings instant relief even in the worst cases. 
It cures when all else fails. 

The REV. C. F. "WEI^S of Villa Ridge, 111., says: 
"Your trial bottle of Asthmalene received in good 
condition. I cannot tell you how thankful I feel for 
the good derived from it I was a slave chained with 
putrid sore throat and asthma for ten years. I 
despaired of ever being cured. I saw your adver- 
tisement for the cure of this dreadful and tormenting 
disease, Asthma, and thought you had overspoken 
yourselves, but resolved to give it a trial. To my 
astonishment the trial acted like a charm. Send me 
a full-size bottle." 

Rev. Dr. Morris Wechsler 

Rabbi of Cong Bnai Israel. 
New York, Jan. 3, 1901. 
Drs. Taft Bros'. Medicine Co. 

Gentlemen: Your Asthmalene is an excellent 
remedy for Asthma and Hay Fever, and its composi- 
tion alleviates all troubles which combine with 
Asthma. Its success is astonishing and wonderful. 
After having it carefully analyzed we can state that 
Asthmalene contains no opium, morphine, chloro- 
form or ether. Very truly yours, 

REV. DR. MORRIS WECHSLER. 

Avon Springs, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1901. 
Dr. Taft Bros. Medicine Co. 

Gentlemen: I write this testimonial from a sense 
of duty, having tested the wonderful effect of your 
Asthmalene for the cure of Asthma. My wife has 
been afflicted with spasmodic asthma for the past 
twelve years. Having exhausted my own skill, as 
well as many others, I chanced to see your sign upon 
your windows on 130th street, New York, and I at 
once obtained a bottle of Asthmalene. My wife commenced taking it about the 1st of November. 
I very soon noticed a radical improvement. After using one bottle her Asthma has disappeared and 
she is entirely free from all symptoms. I feel that. I can consistently recommend the medicine to all 
who are afflicted wfth this distressing disease. Yours respectfully, 

O. D. PHEI.PS, M. D. 

Dr. Taft Bros.' Medicine Co. Feb. 5, 1901. 

Gentlemen: I was troubled with Asthma for 22 years. I have tried numerous remedies, but they 
have all failed. I ran across you 1 advertisement and started with a trial bottle. I found relief at 
once. I have since purchased your full-sized bottle, and I am ever grateful. I have a family of four 
children and for six years was unable to work. I am now in the best of health and am doing 
business every day. This testimony you can maUe such use of as ycu see fit. 

Home address, 235 Rivington street. S. RAPHAEL, 67 East 129th street. City. 

TRIAL BOTTLE SENT ABSOLUTELY FREE ON RECEIPT OF POSTAL 

Do not delay. Write at once, addressing DR. TAFT BROS*. MEDICINE CO., 79 East 130th 
Street, New York City. 



THE BEST CASING PULLER 



RELIEF. 



Tbe Norton Ratchet Jack 

With Ring and Slips for Pulling 
Casing. 



ALWAYS SAFE, READY AND EFFECTIVE 



This jack is self lubricating, pro- 
vided with ball bearings, giving 
maximum of efficiency with mini- 
mum of friction. No blocking re- 
quired, as the hold of the ring and 
slips is absolute. Convenient to 
operate, light and durable. For 
prices and particulars address 

M. G. WEST, 216 California Street, San Francisco. 




Bovaifd & Seyfang Mfg Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OP ■ 



Stationary and Portable Boilers, Steam Engines, 

Iron Tanks, Rig Iron Outfits, Drilling and Fish ng Tools, 

And everything needed to drill and operate 



Oil, Gas and Artesian Wells 

Manufacturers' Agents for Tubing, Casing, Pipe Fittings, Valves, Etc. 
Natural Gas Plants a Specialty. 

Cable address, "Boang." A B C and Private Codes. 

BRADFORD, PA., U. S- A. 



Tank Steamers. 

The petroleum tank fleet has 
been a source of considerable in- 
terest to the seafaring men and 
marine underwriters, all of whom 
at first predicted dire disaster, but 
as they are among the stanchest 
craft afloat, they have survived 
disasters which would have re- 
sulted in the complete distruction 
of the ordinary ocean steamer. 
An investigation was instituted 
recently, and the result has been 
entertainingly written out for the 
New York Sun as follows: 

The first of the great iron tank 
ships launched by the Standard 
Oil company was aptly named the 
Maverick, for it was destined to 
wanderings as great as those of an 
unclaimed Texas steer. After 
knocking around the Seven Seas, 
it was burned with its cargo of oil 
in the harbor of Halifax and sunk; 
then fished out, weirdly twisted by 
heat and water, rebuilt and re- 
commissioned. When the war with 
Spain was declared it accompanied 
Sampson's fleet all through the 
war as a water supply ship for 
both sailors and ships in transit. 
When the war was over it was 
promptly returned to coast oil 
trade where it is now doing busi- 
ness as usual. Its career may be 
taken as typical, for there is no 
other vessel afloat that encounters 
so man) adventures and misad- 
ventures as the tank ship, and 
none other would survive half of 
them. 

Tank ships, widly scattered over 
the oceans, have done great ser- 
vice to shipping in the way of 
towing disabled vessels to port and 
rescuing crews from wrecks. Tbey 
are the stanchest ships of the seas, 
because of their division into water- 
tight compartments, which are 
always kept closed. Several com- 
partments may be damaged by 
collision or otherwise, and the 
steamship will still keep afloat and 
steam to port. 

The tank ship Beacon Light 
once ran on an iceberg and tore 
out a considerable part of her 
bottom, but continued on her 
voyage to port. Several of these 
ships have been ashore, but by 
pumping out compartments were 
able to draw away and proceed. 
The tank ship Energie ran on a 
rock of the Lizard, doing much 
damage, but got off by emptying 
some compartments, arriving in 
Bremen two days late. 

But though it will win through 
many perils of water, the tank 
ship falls victim to fire, notwith- 
standing the greatest precautions 
of cofferdams, or double bulkheads, 
which are filled with water* and 
despite constant watchfulness on 
board. The case of the Maverick 
at Halifax is characteristic. 

At a time when oil was being 
pumped into the ship, and some 
one had carelessly left open the 
door leading between decks, a pipe 
burst. Before the pu.np could be 
stopped the oil was forced through 
the open door into the fire room. 



An additional cargo of case oil, 
unusual in vessels of this class, 
hampered prompt use of fire appa- 
ratus. The Maverick was sunk in 
the harbor as a last resort. The 
total bill for the episode was 
$150,000. 

The tank ship WeehawkeU was 
once proceeding down the Dela- 
ware fiver, when she ran on a 
rock, injuring her coffer dam and 
permitting her cargo to run into 
her fire room. When the fire was 
over there was no Weehawken 
left, only old iron. The tank ship 
Attila went ashore at Nodre Ren- 
ner, Denmark. The oil reaching 
the fire room soon furnished a 
grand blaze. After she had been 
burning ten days, a hole was bio-" n 
in her with dynamite, causing her 
boiler room to fill with water. 

A salvage ship then approached 
and began flooding her burning 
holds, when a tremendous explo- 
sion took place, involving the 
whole afterpart of the vessel, and 
wounding many of the salvors, 
the remainder escaping by jump- 
ing overboard. The fire then 
raged furiously. It was only sub- 
dued by exploding more dynamite 
and flooding the entire vessel with 
water. The ship was then 
tightened, pumped out, towed to 
Copenhagen and repaired. She is 
still in service. 

The tank ship Minister Maybach 
left New York in December, 1898, 
on her maiden voyage, laden with 
1,750,000 gallons of oil and a crew 
of thirty-two men. She was never 
heard of again. It was the mem- 
orable January when there were 
heavy gales, in which at least ten 
steamships were lost. • She may 
have shared their fate or she may 
have blown up, as many believe. 

One tank ship, the General 
Knox, ladened with case oil, 
burned at the foot of Wall street, 
affording a splendid spectacle for 
financiers. On the beach at Fire 
Island may still be seen the wreck 
of the tank steamer Gluckauf. half 
buried in sand. She was driven 
ashore there, and the best efforts 
of her crew could not bring her off 
from the shifting bottom. 

One great danger to tank ships 
appears after the cargo has been 
discharged, when gas generates in 
the empty tanks. Any kind of 
open flame results in an explosion. 
Electric hand lamps are now gen- 
erally used. It is the gases gener- 
ated by the oil, not the oil itself, 
which explode. 



Another Refinery. 

Representatives of the Union 
Oil Company paid a visit to the 
Kern River field last Saturday, 
according to a Bakersfield special, 
and as a result of the trip it was 
announced that another great en- 
terprise in the form of a big re- 
finery has been decided upon for 
that field. Though the details 
have not yet been made public, 
it was stated that the enterprise 
would be established on section 8 
and work be begun soon. 



$g8^^E^&?^&3?&3fi^&^^ 



OIL 



OIL 



Deal with responsible people if yon want to be protected 

"A word to the wise is sufficient." 

Success camps with success. 

"Theu follow success 

Hollow me ! ! ! 

Willi 14 producing companies I've broken the record — 7 to 1. 

Where would you have been, had you followed mc? 

The secret of my success lies in the fact that I place my clients on proven property. 

I let others ' wild-cat" and " prospect." 

I'll be their neighbor IF they strike oil. 

Write for a FREE copy of my "Illustrated Oil Fields," which describes the origin 

of oil in all its phases, where it is found, etc., etc. 
References: San Francisco Banks. 

Authentic information furnished regarding any oil company in the State of California. 
I have trustworthy data always available. 
Correspondence welcomed: 

JAMES R.T.MERSHON 



*§ 

CM 

1 
1 
I 

1 

% 

S3 
v. 



1 
I 
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ap 
Sf 

1 
1 



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88 



$3 



MEMBER SAN FRANCISCO OIL EXCHANGE 



Rooms 537=8-9 



1 
1 



PARROTT BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



OIL 



OIL 



$ 



$ 



1 
1 
I 
I 

1 
1 



gigss^s&saisss^sasasa^ssssas; 






H 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



OIL DIRECTORY 



Leading Companies Now Operat- 
ing in California. 



s 



UP3RI0R Oil, COMPANY. 



/"1AUSTOGA Oily AND DEVELOPMENT CO. 

500,000 shares par value $1 , 
Operating on 2320 acres located in Napa, Yolo, 
Fresno, San Benito, Monterey and Kern counties. 
Officers: L, D Hitchcock, president; R B Todd, 
vice-president and manager; B F Edwards, 
secretary; J M Caselman, treasurer; Dr. H G 
Thomas and Dr. E J Boyes. San Francisco 
National Bank, depository. Office, 23 and 24 
Merchants Exchange, Sau Francisco, Cal. 



/CYGNET PETROLEUM CO. 

Capital $150,000 

50,000 shares at $3. 

Location — Fresno county. 

Directors— Chas. L Fair, president, Blitz W Pax- 
ton, vice-president, Chas. A. Lee, treasurer, John 
C. McElroy, secretary. 

Office— 561 Parrott Building. 

Tel.— South 184. 

Z^IUYAMA VALLEY OIL COMPANY. 

Capital $1,000,000 

1,000,000 shares at $1.00. 

Location, 80 acres in 4, 9-25 in Santa Barbara 
County and 80 acres in 15, 10-24 in Kern County. 
Incorporated under the laws of South Dakota. 

Directors— W. H. Turner. President; Robt. 
Johnson, Secretary and Treasurer; Andrew 
Christensen, Frederick Misch, L. M. Hickox; 
Depository, Western National Bank. 

Pacific States Mining & Investment Company, 
fiscal agents. 

Office— 326 Post Street, San F-iancisco. 



D 



ABNEY OIL COMPANY. 



Incorporated. 
McKittrick district. 16 completed wells; no 
acres proven ground. 
Office, 330 Pine St., Room 5, San Francisco, Cal. 



f^ REAT NORTHERN OIL CO. OF OAKLAND 

Capital $250,000 

250,000 shares at $1 

125,000 shares of treasury stock. 

Location of property, Glenn County, Calif,, 2,200 

acres, near Elk Creek, in Stoney Creek Mineral 

district. 

Officers, B F Arnold, President, Geo A Gray 
Secretary. 
Office, 476 Tei/.h street, Oakland, 



Capital stock, 500,000 shares, par value $1 each 

5960 acres of I tnd in the Sunset and McKittrick 
district. 

Two Standard rigs operating at present time. 

Officers and Directors— R S Aston, president; 
W Dixon, vice-president; J W Crosland, secretary 
and treasurer, Wm. M Landess, W W Kelly and 
W G Wallace. Attorney, C C Cowgill. Office, No. 
17 Galtes block. Bakersfield. Cal 



S. OIL AND MINING CO. 



U. 

Capital $300,000 

Par value, $1 per share. 

Location: 320 acres in Kern River District, 160 
acres in section 27, 11-24 Sunset district, near Blod- 
gett & Jewett wells, no acres on fraction 26, 12-24, 
near Monarch, adjoining Jewett, Blodgett & Beal 
gusher. L- M. Underwood, president, F Ketelhut 
sect tary. 

Office— 2ii 19th street. Bnkersfield.lCal, 



WALDORF OIL AND ASPHALT COMPANY. 
Incorporated Feb 25, igor. Capital, $500,000 
500,000 shares at Jr. 00 per share. Place of busi- 
ness, Hauford, Cal. Headquarters at McCord & 
Son. Location of lauds. 1.2.0, Guadalupe, Santa 
Barbara county, Cal. Officers and directors: Geo 
B McCord. president. Hauford; Dr N P Duncan, 
vice-president, Hauford; J O Hickman, treas- 
urer. Hauford; Win M Madden, attorney for com- 
pany. San Francisco; W H Worswick. field super- 
intendent. Hauford; F Brader, Hanford, N Weis- 
baum, Hanford. LS Chittenden, Hanford. W H 
Worswick. Jr, Hanford. Jas Manasse, secretary. 



I Oil Prospectuses 



Booklets, Stock Certificates, .Letterheads, Eavelopes, Dodgers, 
Letter Circulars, etc., 



M 



ONTEREY OIL DEVELOPMENT CO. 



Capital $1,000,000 

1,000,000 shares at $1 each. 

Location of lands: Coaliuga oil fields, Fresno 
county, 160 acres; Pauoche oil fields, San Benito 
county, 160 acres; Monterey county oil belt, 4280 
acres. 

Officers: Dr J L Roberts, president; J B S Malt- 
ly, vice-president; J F Moore, secretary; D J 
Boughton. treasurer; Bank of Monterey , deposi- 
tory. Office at Monterey City, Cal. 



OCCID ENTAL OIL CO. 
OF WEST VIRGINIA. 

Capital stock 600,000 shares par value, $1.00. 

Officers: Wm. Crites, president: F. M Graham, 
vice-president; J. B. Batz, treasurer; C. E. Hail- 
tone, secretary; T. L, Moran, manager; Kein 
alley Bank, Cal. Depository. 
M. R. Goldberg, 483 Ninth street Oakland, Cal 



OBISPO OIL COMPANY. Capital, $1,000,000. 
Number of shares, 1,000,000. Treasury 
stock, 550,000 shares. All stock fully paid and 
non-assessable. Incorporated under the laws of 
California. Properties in Kern, Fresno, San 
Benito and San Luis Obispo counties, Cal. In- 
corporators: G R Parkinson, President Bank of 
Palo Alto; Captain Frank Barrett. Palo Alto, Cal.; 
K W Brown, Fresno, Cal.; Chas E Bond, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. ; C F Alderson Chicago, III. Offi- 
cers: John F Giles, president; Frank Barrett, 
vice president; Chas K Bond, treasurer; C F 
Aldeison, secretary, K W Brown, assistant secre- 
tary. Office, Suite 74. Citizens Bank building, 
119-121 La Salle street, Chicago, 111. 



OCCIDENTAL OIL COMPANY 
OF WEST VIRGINIA. 

Capital stock, 600,000 shares par value, $1.00 

Officers— Win. Crites, president; F "M. Graham, 
vice-president; J. B. Batz, treasurer , C. E- Hail- 
stone, secretary; T. L- Moran, manager; Kern 
Valley Bank, Cal., depository. 

Mostellar & Allen, San Francisco Agents, 346 
Parrott Bldg. Telephone. Jessie 1683. 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY. Cap'tal stock, 
J2, 850,000; -Par value, $1.00. Has 2,000 acres 
in Kern, Los Angeles and Summerland fields, 
with 27 producing wells. Officers and directors: 
P V Schermerhoru, president; C H Ritchie, vice- 
president; R D Robinson, secretary and treas- 
urer; D M Schermerhorn and W S Morton. Prin 
cipal office, Potomac building. Los Angeles, Cat. 
Tel. John 22S1. 



SALINAS OIL AND DEVELOPMENT COM- 
PANY. Capital, $1,000,000. 1,000.000 shares 
at $1.00. Land in Monterey county. Officers and 
directors: President, W N McCarthy. San Fran- 
cisco; vice-president, J J Gunn, Independence; 
treasurer, Wm N McCarthy; secretary. J B Olsen, 
San Francisco; superintendent, Jno C Quinn; C A 
Burchom, J E Baker, N A Dorn, W J Ellis and S 
S Simon, attorney, Hon Eugene F Bert, San Fran 
cisco Office, room 573-574 Parrott building, San 
Francisco. 



S 



URETY OIL COMPANY 



Capital $600,000 

600,000 shares par value $1.00 each. 

Location, 240 acres in section 20 and 29 T 3 N R 
16 W, S B M, Los Angeles County, Calif., Newhall 
district 

Officers and, Directors, M Esternaux. President, 
Geo. Greely King, Vice-President, T. H. Pearne, 
Secretary. D. A. Thieme, M. C. White. 

Farmers and Merchants Banks, depository. 

Office. 102 Henne Block, Los Angeles, Calif. 



S 



TANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 



Capital , $?oo,ooo 

Treasury stock $150,000 

Location: 92 acres leased proven oil land in 
McKittrick; 80 acrei owned in Coatinga near 
Home Oil company, Fresno; 160 acres owned ad- 
joining oil well in Napa valley. 

Officers: R A Falkenberfc, president; R L Bis- 
by, vice-president; M J Henry, secretary; J G 
Steele, treasurer; F Cooke-Caldwell, attorney for 
company. 

Offices: 475-76 Parrott Building, 855 Market 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS 



Mexico 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

SPECIAL TRAIN 
EXCURSION 

PERSONALLY CONDUCTED 

COMPOSITE CAR, DINING CAR 

VESTIBULED SLEEPERS 

RATE LEAVES 

$80 SAN FRANCISCO Dec. 18 
$70 LOS ANGELES Dec. 19 



I 

■f Printed at short notice and at reasonable prices. f 

I Pacific Oil Reporter Job Office f 

f Rooms 31, 32 and 33 jf 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco t 

I I 

The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wrench gg-g^'&sSs 




Drilllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND "MONEY SAVED, 
It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits. 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



Good sixty days. Optional side trips. 

Special rates from all California 

Points. 

Inquire of Agent for Literature- 



ARIZONA INCORPORATIONS 



We make a specialty of chartering Ari- 
zona Corpora'.ions. Arizona has the 
most liberal laws in the United States- 
no taxes to pay, stock made non-assess- 
able, no personal liability for corporate 
debts. 

We take stock for cur service, if you de- 
sire. We save you one-half the fees 
charged by others, and help you pro- 
mote your enterprise. We give you a 
certificate *hat you are duly incorpor- 
ated. All business attended to by an 
expert corporation lawyer. Correspond- 
ence solicited. 



THE WESTERN INVESTMENT CO 

Rooms 1 and 3, Porter Block 
PHOENIX - - ARIZONA 



For Lease 

Twenty acres of absolutely proven oil 
land in McKittrick district to lease on 
royalty basis for development work. 
Chance for good, responsible driller. 
Securities required. 

For further particulars, address, ■ 

W. G. KERCKHOFF 

Wilcox Block, Los Angeles. 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Oil Well Casing Oil Stills 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets. P. O. Box 231 

Telephone, Main 196. Baker Block. Station C 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 




m 



i 
§ 

I 

1 

1 



1 

m 

i 



Webster Iron Works 1 

~~ i 

ess 



DEPARTMENTS: 



MACHINE SHOPS 
BLACKSMITH SHOP 



£& 



FOUNDRY 
PATTERN SHOP 



11 

m 
1 
i 

I 

m 
m 
I 

Rig Irons, Sand Reels, Sand Pumps, Drilling and Fishing f|| 
Tools, Heai'y Forgings. |^ 



MINING, MILLING and MACHINE CASTINGS 



Telephone 341 



21st and I Streets. 

BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 



PO.Box 463 



11 





^ \ . ." s" 

For prices, etc., inquire 



W. FORGIE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil & das Well Rig Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San 
Francisco, Cal,, Bakersfield, Cal. 



PACFIC OIL REPORTER. 



»S 



«W»« W«i{ W»KW«5iSi»»»! 



Stock Guaranteed 

BY 

Gold Bond 

mg 3 per cent interest pel 
annum, payable semi-annually, 

Deposited as Security 

for full amount of put 
price. 



American Tool Works ' s C0OPER c EM E 

219 Crocker Building 
JOSBPB 8ASTWOOD, Proprietor. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

MANDFACTORBSS OF 

Standard and Special Drilling Tools 



SPKCIAI.TIKS 



Limited amount of 
LSSESSABLB STOCK 

offcrcil at fl.00 per share. 



Hollister 

Crude Oil Co., Ltd., 

308 Market Street 

San Francisco 

Responsible Brokers Wanted. 




Smith=Premier 
Typewriters 

Are Used Everywhere 

READ THIS LIST: 
Heald's Business College use 30 
Southern Pacific Co. system .47 

Western Onion Tel. Co 36 

S. F. Public Schools now use. . .43 



S. F. Call 

Hale Bros 

Viavi Co 

Cogswell College 

Miller, Scott & Sloss 



.21 

.14 
'3 



Get information from us about 
the new SPEED Device. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

no Montgomery St., S. F. 



All Sizes oT Hoagland's Patent Casing 
Spears for Rent. 

109=111 Mission Street, 

Bet. Spear and Main 

Telephone, Main 5578 



Patent 
Redwood 



OIL TANKS 



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CQ 




42 feet diameter. 18 feet high. Capacity, 177,500 gallons. 



Atlas Pipe Wrench^C 

Received highest award at Pan-American Exposition, Buffalj, N. Y., ujoi. 



IT HAS 
NO EQUAL l^J 




NO THREADS 
TO STRIP 



oDDDauDDnnnnanannuDDnnapDD 
n a 

g Before buying Oil Stock or g 

□ leasing or buying Oil Lauds n 
g call on A. BARIEAU, Room ° 
g 23 Columbian Building, 916 g 
n Market Street, San Francisco c 

□ a 
annQnnnannnnDnnnDnuapnnnnn 



Made in four sizes — 10, 18, 24 and 36 inches. 

Atlas Tube Cleaner 

Received highest award at Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, N. Y., 1901, 



For Water=tube 
Boilers 




It Has No 
Equal 



Write for circulars. Ask your supply man. 
Manufactured by 

ATLAS PIPE WRENCH CO. Pl00d gK"*^ 

New York Office, 121 Liberty Street Works, New Haven, Conn. 



Petroleum Oil, Asphaltum and 
kindred hydrocarbons 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 



We carry the largest Stock. Our prices are 
Kqultable. 

Tel. Main, 1133. 



When you want to swear go to 

LEE D. CRAIG 

Notary Public and 
Commissioner of Deeds 



316 Montgomery St, 

bet. California 

and Pine, San Francisco. 



The Road to Wealth 

Headquarters School and Governmen 
Lands. 

Lands all couuties in California. No conditions 
on School Lands as to residence or cultivation 
Only $1.25 an acre. Locat:c-K in all Mineral Belt. 
—Kern River, McKittrick, Devil's Den, Mojave, 
Sunset, (Joalinga and other famous districts. The 
Cheapest, Safest and Surest Investment in Anier- 
ca. Send Stamp for Land Book. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 

Los Angeles, California. 

400,000 Shares of Oil Stock 



Dividend No. 1 

Hf.s been authorized to be declared November 
15th, payable to the stockholders of the Ventura 
Consolidated Crude Oil Company. 

This company has made surprising progress in 
the past four months. It now has three produc- 
ing wells and work progressing on No. 4. With 
2720 acres of oil land and a rich gold mine in 
Arizona there can be no doubt of the present 
investment value of this stock. Limited amount 
of treasury stock now offered at 15 cents per 
share, par value, $1.00. — Full paid— Non-assessa- 
ble. Agents wanted in every town. Address all 
orders for stock or further particulars to 

W. G. YOUNG & CO., 

Fiscal Agents. 
-30 Laughlin Blilg., Los Angeles, C»I. 



628 



The Star Drilling Machine 



ut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machine 
oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 
ave boiler mounted upoD trucks separate. 




Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 



The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a Hurt of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 
recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are simple, 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Territory 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON OHIO. 



AUSTIN'S PORTABLE DRILLING RIGS 

• Made in sizes to suit territory. Simple, powerful, efficient. 

Crude Oil Fuel Burning Plants for Boilers, Furnaces and Ovens. Boilers, 

Engines, Oil Storage and Wagon Tanks, Refining Equipment, 

Oil, Gas and Artesian Well Supplies of every description, 

Drilling and Fishing Tools 

Standard Wrought Iron Pipe, Cast Iron and Mal- 
leable Iron Fittings. 

BRASS AND IRON VALVES 



Oil Well Casing, Tubing, Drive and Line Pipe 

Catalogues, Estimates and Specifications 

furnished on application. 




Austin's Latest Improved Combination Drilling Machine. This machine will drill in ordinary formations at five times the speed of a Standard rig 



GEORGE H. TAY COMPANY 

49 to 53 First Street, San Francisco 

^r^^WW WW WW WW W WW^V W V WW WW WW WW W^r^^WW WW WWW WW W WW WW WW V V V W W V W ^^^^FW VW^ fWf W W ???▼▼¥■ W •• W W W WW WWW 

Not Quantity of Land but Quality 

SILVER STAR OIL COMPANY 



Capital Stock 300,000 Shares 



Par Value $1.00 per Share 



THE LAND OF THIS COMPANY comprises the SE quarterof the NW quarter of Section 28, Township 30 S., Range 22 E. This property is directlyin line of pro- 
duction and within one-quarter of a mile of the famous Dabney wells, and land that cannot be purchased for less than $20,000 per acre, and only 1 mile from the S. P. 
R. R. station at McKittrick. Immense deposits of asphaltum are found ou this land, as well as numerous seepages of oil and live oil sand on the surface. There can 
scarcely be a doubt as to the enormous value of this laud, but the drill alone will tell 
WORK HAS COMMENCED. Well No. 1 is now almost completed and is in oil. 
FOR A SHORT TIME ONLY a limited quantity of stock in this company is offered at 25 CENTS PER SHARE. Write for Prospectus to the 

Silver Star Oil Co., 607=608 Safe Deposit Building, San Francisco 

PLEASE MENTION THE PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 




DON'T FORGET 

€-PARKE & LACY C0.-3* 

With Large Stocks at 
BAKBRSFIELD AND SAN FRANCISCO 



Will Fill Your Orders for 



OIL WELL SUPPLIES 



Promptly at Proper Prices 



V.W.J-? r Vj 'W 



21 Fremont Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



16 Fish Building 
BAKBRSFIELD. CAL, 



~C £ /Qt>J Q 



J, 



A I 



Endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 




I 




SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15. 1901. 




e$$«S$$«S»S«$$S5$«SS««SS*$«$S3*^$«S«5S^ 



The third edition of our little 
booklet has been received. You 
should write for one. 



WJSvvW^JJJwWJS^^J^ftf^JS^WIs 






i 

! 

I 
I 
I 






$100 BUYS 

200 SHARES 
OIL STOCKS 

In Ai Oil Company; 200 barrel well. Stock sold in lots 
of $100 and up. Guaranteed against loss by 

Security Gold Bond 

Indorsed by a Trust Company of $1,000,000 paid up capi- 
tal. Cash returned at maturity of bond. Safe, legitimate. 
Investigate. Stock shares in all dividends and profits. 
Handsome illustrated booklets of oil fields, with official 
map, for 10 cents in stamps. 

ILLINOIS OIL BOND COMPANY 

Room 506 Dearborn Street, Chicogo. 

Home Office, Room 7, first floor, Mills Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



^^.'<^.^^.'*^.(*^.^^.^^.<*^.^^.i<^.^«^.(»^.(»^.^^i*^^^^- < ^, >t ^,j r?? , !# ^^ 



t 






We offer you 



Don't You Think 

a good opportunity for investment ? Thousands 
have read our little booklet during the past 30 days 
and hundreds are placing their surplus cash with us 
because they have investigated and know we are 
safe, strong and progressive. They want to buy our 
stock at bedrock prices. DO YOU ? 



ADDRESS 



Standard Consolidated 
Oil and Land Company 

ROOM 7, 532 MARKET STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MEMBERS CALIFORNIA PETROLEUM MINERS' ASSOCIATION 



jsssssMswswssssssssssssssssssssssswsa 



Struck Oil 

South of the River 



The Panorama has struck oil at 1185 feet in 14, 29=28, a 
mile and a half south of the Discovery well, in the Kern 
River District. 

This strike has opened up an immense new territory. 
The oil is lighter and more valuable than the oil found 
north of the river, and the oil sand is more prolific. 

I have several hundred acres of land south of the river 
near where the Wizard Oil Company is now down 1,057 
feet, with every prospect of striking oil. 

In order to prove this land I will sell 

50 ACRES AT $100 PER ACRE. 

EASY TERMS 

This offer must be taken up at once or it will be with- 
drawn. 

None but principals need apply. For particulars ad- 
dress 

B. W. W., 

Care of Pacific Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 3. No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAT... PRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15.1001. 



Prick, Ten Cents 



THE YANKEE GIRL. 



One of the Most Progressive Companies Now 
Operating in California. 



San Joaquin, 
others, have 
fact that the 
are pumped the 



The Pacific On. Rkimiktkr pre company, which a few 
sents to its readers this week four brought in another 
half-tone reproductions of photo- flowing well. 
graphs of the Los Angeles wells 
of the Yankee Girl Oil company. 

These wells are the first wells 
yet drilled by the company and 
are the first of a large number 
which will be operated by this 
company on its own land within a 
very short period. 

The Yankee Girl owns land in 
all the principal oil districts of the 
state. 

Its first operations were in the 
Los Angeles field where it has a 
fine tract of land in the heart of 
the best portion of the Los An- 
geles field. 

Well No. 1 was completed about 
a year ago and has been yielding 
oil steadily ever since. A month 
ago it was cleaned out and deep- 
ened and is now yielding over 
twenty barrels a day — a yield 
much above the average of Los 
Angeles wells. 

Well No. 2 was completed a 
month later than No. 1, and has 
been pumping steadily ever since. 

The company owns its own 
tanks, and the wells are pumped 
by the most improved pumping 
plant obtainable. 

Since these wells were com- 
pleted, the management of the 
company has turned its attention 



days ago 
400-barrel 



Thiity-Three, the 
the Peerless and 
demonstrated the 
more the wo I Is 
freer they flow. 

In addition to its valuable hold- 
ings in Los Angeles and Kern 
River districts the Yankee Girl 
Oil company also owns 160 acres 
in the womlerful, and newly de- 
veloped Sunset oil district which 



The land owned by the Yankee llas been made famous by produc- 



pro- 



numbered among the big 
ducers of this great district. 

In addition to the above rich oil 
lands owned outright by the 
Yankee Girl company, it has 
eighty acres under deed in the 
wonderfully rich McKittrick dis- 
trict, where are the great wells of 
the Kern River company and the 
Dabney Oil company. The prop- 
erty of the Yankee Girl is in 31, 
21-31, and is near the producing 



Girl in the Kern River district , ing some of the greatest gushers wells of the J. B. Treadwell corn- 




Well No. 1 of the Yankee Girl. 



Well No. 2 of the Yankee Girl. 



was formerly a portion of the land 
belonging to the celebrated Grace 
Oil company, and has recently 
been appraised at $3,000 an acre. 



in the state, such as the Monarch, 
the Areola, California Fortune, 
the Navajo, and others. 

This district has been handi- 



The company owns enough land capped by its distance from rail- 
to put down fifty wells, and as the j road transportation. A month 
oil sand in this district is from 300] ago, however, the Santa Fe com- 



to 500 feet in thickness, the life 
of the oil wells will be at least 



pleted a spur track into the heart 
of the field and will undoubtedly 




Waste Oil From No. I. 



Wells Nos. 1 and . 



to other oil districts where the 
wells yield a much larger output. 
The company has secured land 
in the Kern River district, adjoin- 
ing the land of the York Syndi- 
cate which last month brought in 
a 400-barrel well. On the other 
side the land of the Yankee Girl 
adjoins that of the Vulcan Oil 



twenty years each. This is 
a marked contrast to the 
life of Eastern wells. As a matter 
of fact experience has proved that 
the more these wells are pumped 
and thus freed from sand, the 
greater is the output of oil. 

The oldest wells in tbe Kern , 
River district, such as those of the 



continue the line into the Midway 
district. 

The Yankee Girl owns 160 
acres in 5, 11-24, j ust west of the 
great Monarch well. As soon as 
the Yankee Girl has completed a 
few wells in Kern River district, 
it will turn its attention to its 
Sunset prop erty and will soon be 



pany, Mr. Treadwell being the 
gentleman who manages the oil- 
producing property of the South- 
ern Pacific company in the Kern 
River oil fields. 

The Yankee Girl also owns 320 
acres, under deed, in the great 
Topo field of San Benito county, 
where the indications are favor- 
able for opening up one of the 
greatest refining oil districts in 
the state. 



Changing to Oil. 

The following bay steamers 
either have abandoned or will soon 
abandon the use of coal for fuel: 
Ferryboats Oakland, Solano, Pied- 
mont, San Pablo, Thoroughfare, 
Transit, and Tamalpais, the tugs 
Hermosa, Richmond and Prentiss, 
the Vallejo steamer General Fris- 
bie, and the steam schooners Al- 
bion River, Lindauer and Olympic. 



Crude oil for the purposes of fuel 
will be admitted freeof duty to the 
southern republic, provided that 
plans proposed by the Mexican 
government can be adjusted. The 
Waters Pierce company (Standard) 
now pays the government an 
annual import duty on petroleum 
for refining purposes of $1,200,000, 
and if any means can be devised 
by which the government may be 
satisfied that the crude oil admitted 
free is to be used for no other pur- 
pose than that of fuel, and not for 
refining, the ruling will be made 
and crude oil admitted free. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



THE COMBINE. 



Pertinent Comments of the London Petro= 
leum Review. 



What the Oil Authority of England Thinks of the Effect 
the Combine Will Have on Our Oil Industry. 



In its last issue the Petroleum 
Review contained an article on 
the proposed California combine. 
It should be borne in mind that 
the view advocated by Oil, Copper 
and Finance is opposed by the 
combine which insists that indi- 
vidual ownership of land by com- 
panies etc., be abrogated, and that 
all deeds be made over to the com- 
bine, which pays its debts in bon 's 
and stocks. The article is as fol- 
lows: 

As is the case in pretty nearly 
every instance where a question 
of some importance is before the 
public, the subject of Kern River 
oil organization has divided 
opinions into Uvo well defined 
camps, each having its special 
mouthpiece among the press. The 
one is the exhibition of hopeful- 
ness and confidence, advocating 
and encouraging action along the 
lines laid down, the other repre- 
sents skepticism allied with a 
hope of seeing things drift into 
better shape. 

In a recent article on the tend 
encies towards amalgamation, and 
no doubt as a special memento to 
oil men interested in the pending 
Kern River question, Oil, Copper 
and Finance emphasizes the con- 
solidation of management as the 
most desirable form, allowing 
ownership to remain perfectly un- 
altered. As our contemporary also 
points out, non-paying properties 
are not converted into profit pro- 
ducers of a satisfactory character 
by the mere change from many 
owners to one, but by the 
economics of management rendered 
possible by the change. It might 
have added some other effects of a 
potential value, such as harmon- 
ized action of previously separated 
units, and the possibility of a more 
complete and intelligent grasp ot 
the market situation. This kind 
of consolidation is finding favor in 
ever increasing measure with Cali- 
fornia operators, and several such 
schemes are likely to be realized 
in the near future, quite independ- 
ently of the fate which is in store 
for the greater plan. 

On looking over to the other 
camp, we find a correspondent to 
the Pacific Oil Reporter airing 
the views of the small producer, 
as it is termed, and as might be 
confidently anticipated, the or- 
ganization is characterized as "bar- 
tering away his birthright for a 
mess of pottage." This is very 
much like what we have heard 
before, and what we shall proba- 



bly hear on a good many other 
occasions, whenever there is talk 
of effecting organization of some 
kind. The sentiment is perhaps 
not a very commendable one, 
especially if it has no better justi- 
fication than would appear from a 
merely superficial view of the ob- 
jection; possibly it would be much 
more business-like to let us have a 
sober estimate of the value of that 
birthright, before attempting any 
enlightening parallel. It is only 
natural and proper that we should 
find our Oil City contemporary in 
the same boat. The proposed com- 
bination, it says, among others, 
cannot create a market. A little 
later on we find it endorsing the 
view that the Standard would find 
whatever markets were necessary. 
It would appear, therefore, that 
the markets are there — some- 
where — and have no need of being 
created. This seems like holding 
out the bogus of over-production 
in one breath, and assuring that 
no such thing really exists in the 
other. The second thought , we 
should say, is the better one. 
There is plenty of room for the oil, 
and the only thing is to move and 
find it, for the attainment of which 
purpose ample means and enter- 
prise are requisite. 

Although there is, thus, a patent 
looseness of the arguments against 
consolidation, the question has 
nevertheless to be decided on 
other than purely theoretical 
grounds. Will the projected com- 
bination, or rather its executive 
men, possess the competent grasp 
and enterprise, which are before 
anything essential for the clearing 
up of the present unsatisfactory 
situation? We cannot help feeling 
that the possibilities are much 
against this assumption. The 
Standard Oil Company has come 
to be looked upon in the American 
oil world — and outside, for that 
matter — as a professional "pacifier" 
in all difficulties pertaining to the 
industry, and if any attempts at 
"grand strokes" of independence 
are made at all, they are generally 
abortive. We have expressed our 
opinion long since that the 
Standard had realized the pros- 
pective importance of California as 
an oil producer, and was moving 
in its usual quiet and competent 
way with an ultimate view to con- 
trolling the trade and industry in 
that state. As the Pacific Oil 
Reporter points out, Ohio, stood 
a few years ago in the same pre- 
dicament- as California now, there 



being plenty of oil but no open 
market for it. Then the Standard 
entered, built ample storage facili- 
ties, purchased the oil and found 
a market; in other words, trans- 
portation and storage facilities 
were perfected, and intelligent 
business methods introduced. 
When these things had made their 
influence felt, their was no more 
talk of over production, and so it 
will be in California. That the 
Standard will be the savior, there 
is every reason to believe. It is 
pushing its operations in California 
at a very determined pace, and 
apparently with absolute confi- 
dence as to the future measures on 
the part of California oil producers. 



SOUTH OF KERN RIVER. 



The District That Will Prove 
Prolific as Kern River. 

Unless scientists and experi- 
enced practical oil men are mis- 
taken the district south of Kern 
River in a few weeks or months 
at farthest will be acknowledged 
to be the equal in the quality and 
quantity of its oil output of any 
district in the state. 

Recently Professor W. L. Watts, 
one of the most conservative as 
well as reliable geologists and oil 
authorities in the United States 
made a careful examination of the 
district south of Kern River, and 
this is his opinion regarding it: 

From the records it appears that in 
the northern portion of the field the 
strike of the oil sand is about north 30' 
west, the dip being south 6o° west, at an 
angle of less than 10°, and in the south 
portion of the field about north 70 west, 
the dip being south 20 west, at an angle 
of less than 10°. 

The Kern River may be s id to bound 
the developed portion of the Kern River 
oil field on the south and east. The 
rock exposures on the banks of the river 
show no evidence of any fault or line of 
geological disturbance, to which the 
course of the channel of the Kern River 
might be attributed, and the terraced 
banks of the river indicate a long period 
of gradual erosion. 

There is a reasonable probabil- 
ity, THEREFORE, THAT REMUNERATIVE 
oil-yielding formations will be 
discovered on the sooth side of 
the kern river. 

The drilling that has been done 
in this territory the past few 
months shows the truth of Prof. 
Watts' conclusion. 

The Panorama had 180 feet of 
oil sand, when the water spoiled 
the well. 

In the Kern news of to-day's 
issue is an account of the hard 
luck that has been met by the 
Spring. 

The Chicago Extension is drill- 
ing away confident of success. 

The Wizard, working farthest 
south, in section 26 is down over 
1,200 feet, but is in trouble on ac- 
count of water. The formations 
indicate oil. 

In some districts in the state it 
is not expected to strike oil before 
2,000 feet or more. In many of 
these districts a hard formation 
is encountered, and a heavy 



standard drilling rig is found to be 
successful. 

Experiments south of the river 
with the ordinary standard rig are 
not satisfactory. 

Drillers have about come to the 
conclusion that instead of a heavy 
standard rig, they should use a 
combination standard and hy- 
draulic — the standard for the hard 
formations, the hydraulic for the 
soft and sandy. 

The same is true in districts 
where " heaving sand" makes it 
impossible to go down no matter 
how much sand is taken out. 

Plenty of water can be easily 
obtained south of the river for use 
in certain kinds of hydraulic rigs. 

Several of the drillers are be- 
seeching their companies to change 
the style of their rigs. 

It is to be hoped one or more of 
the companies now operating will 
conclude to give the hydraulic rig 
a fair trial, and thus demonstrate 
the truth of Prof. Watt's predic- 
tion that oil will be found South 
of Kern River. 



SMELTING ORES. 



New Process to Revolutionize 
Present Methods. 

The plans of the California Iron 
company for the first demonstra- 
tion that the Trapp heating, roast- 
ing and smelting furnace can turn 
out pig iron from the ore in much 
shorter time and at less expense 
than by old processes are about 
completed. The demonstration 
will be made on 100 tons of ore 
from the Tepustete mines of lower 
California within two weeks. 

The company has been incorpo- 
rated in Phoenix with a capital 
of $1,000,000, but San Diego is 
given as its place of business. It 
is proposed to handle iron, copper, 
gold and silver ores — in fact, any 
ore that has to be smelted. For 
the furnace it is claimed that with 
a plant costing only one-tenth of 
what present smelters cost the 
smelting can be done at little more 
than 50 per cent of the present 
cost of turning out the metal from 
the ore. The one furnace now 
erected has a capacity of about 
forty tons a day, and the size of 
the plant can be increased simply 
by increasing the number of simi- 
lar furnaces. The money is be- 
hind the company for the erection 
of a large plant as soon as the 
practicability of this first furnace 
is demonstrated. 

Crude oil will be used as fuel. 



Peru's Oil Product. 

The exportation of petroleum 
from Peru, which at one time 
promised to be a business of im- 
portance, has ceased. It is now 
produced on a commercial scale 
only in the department of Piwia, 
and the product is consumed en- 
tirely in Peru. During 1899 the 
production reached 19,845,991 
liters, including 30,076 liters of 
benzine. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



BIG OIL FIRE. 



The Kern Riser District Has a 
Great Conflagration. 

The largest and most destructive 
fire ever bad in the Kern River 
field occured last Thursday when 
the Mutual Pipe Line company's 
pipe from the Senator wells was 
broken, the oil therein caught on 
fire and was burned as fast as it 
ran out. The oil in the sump hole 
in the neighborhood of the Sena- 
tor holdings was set on fire early 
in the day and before it could be 
controlled had spread until it 
reached the pipe line. The heat 
became so great, says the Cali- 
fornian, that several lengths of 
the pipe parted allowing the oil it 
contained to run into the flames. 
thereby making a very hot, un 
manageable fire. It continued 
burning until the oil from the pipe 
was exhausted, which was several 
hours after the fire was started. 
It is estimated that between 1.5111 
and 2,000 barrels of the crude 
product was consumed. The pipe 
line will be repaired at once. 



San Pablo Using Oil. 

Last Friday the Santa Fe ferry- 
boat San Pablo went on a trial 
trip to Point Richmond burning 
oil for fuel, and appeared to be 
able to maintain her former speed. 
For the past five weeks the San 
Pablo has been at the Union Iron 
Works undergoing the necessary 
alterations in order to substitute 
oil for coal. 



HOT AIR USEFUL. 

How thla Commodity Made a 
Well Row. 

Hot ait" is not generally con- 
sidered to be of much account, but 
the following from the Bakersfield 
California!) would indicate that it 
is soon to come into general use in 
the coming oil district located 
south of Kern River. 

Events of the past two weeks 
have convinced these who have 
: watched the trend of affairs in oil 
circles that there is considerable 
oil underlying that large part of 
the local field adjacent to the 
river and known as section 8. 
Various wells have been drilled 
and oil has been found, but the 
great difficulty has been to get 
the product to the surface; in fact 
it has been hitherto practically 
impossible, but the events above 
referred to have convinced those 
interested not only that oil can be 
gotten out, but that eventually 
the difficulty of deep drilling on 
the south side of Kern River will 
be overcome, through the better 
knowledge of the formations and 
how to handle them, and that 
much oil will then be produced. 

When the Golden Rod drilled 
its well last winter considerable 
evidence of oil was found and an 
attempt was made to pump it. 
All efforts, however, proved futile 
This method and that was resorted 
to without avail and as a last hope 
a small air compressor was in- 



stalled. This also failed. Not- 
withstanding there was a good 
evidence of production it was gen- 
erally couceded that the stock 
could have been purchased for a 
song. The company became dis- 
couraged and practically gave up 
the idea of ever being able to 
operate its well. 

About this time L. W. Goff of 
San Diego appeared upon the 
scene. Mr. Goff didn't know an 
oil well from a sump hole and, 
further, did not pretend to, but he 
did have a good substitute — 
determination, horse sense and 
Yankee genius. He put in a 
larger air compressor and that 
failed He tried a steam pipe to 
the bottom of the hole and that 
failed. He tried a Hall pump and 
that failed. Mr. Goff was now 
nearly at his wits end. It has 
been said by some philosopher 
that " necessity is the mother of 
invention," and to this fact Mr. 
Goff owes his reputation. In des- 
peration he turned his attention 
again to the air compressor with a 
new idea. He would heat the 
air; that's what he'd do. Suiting 
the action to the word he ran an 
air line through a larger steam 
pipe on the way from the boiler 
to the well. This raised the tem- 
perature of the air to that of the 
steam and thus it was forced into 
the hole. Eureka! As soon as 
the oil became thoroughly heated 
the well began to flo«/. The air 



was then shut off and the well has 
continued to flow up to this time, 
for more than a week. 

Mr Goff, in light spirits and a 
happy frame of mind, has returned 
to San Diego to give his brains 
and hands a rest. He stated be- 
fore leaving that if the well ceases 
to How he will return and pump 
her full of " hot air" again. 



A New Incorporation. 

The Western Wyoming Oil com- 
pany, having its place of business 
in I. os Angeles, has filed articles 
of incorporation, showing a capital 
stock of $500,000, divided into 
shares of the par value of $1 each. 
The directors for the first year, 
each of whi m have subscribed for 
one share of stock, are as follows: 
C. E. Price, E. A. Doran, A. C. 
Brouse, M F. Pelton and J. W. 
Kemp of Los Angeles and C. L. 
Claflin and E. J. R. Bishop of 
Bakersfield. 



Jim Jeffries' Oil Lands. 

In the superior court yesterday 
the suit of the "36'' Oil company 
against Champion Jim Jeffries, J. 
A. Yoakum and others for the 
possession of the oil lands of the 
corporation, which has been set- 
tled out of court, was dismissed. 
This is the action in which Yoakum 
and Jim Jeffries have come out 
some $20,000 to the good after long 
litigation. Attorney W. D. Crich- 
ton brought about the compro- 
mise. — Fresno Republican. 



20c Asphaltum Refinery 20c 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure 

Gilt=Edged Stock 



We leased land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have just secured 

6000 ACRES 6000 ACRES 

of land that produces untold quantities of asphalt 
near Sargents Station. 



We have concluded contracts for the sale of all our 
asphalt at a figure which will enable us to pay divi- 
dends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract carload lots for crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses and foundation for Refining Works 
are NOW under construction. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Inside of ten days you will have to pay 50 cents 
per share. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned inside of 90 
days. 



STANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY 

475=476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Hndorsed By the California Petroleum 
Miners* Association. 



W B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 
Office and "Editorial rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Bush, 176 

TERMS 

One Year $250 

Six Months 1 5° 

Three Months 1 00 

Single Copies. 10c 

STRICTLY IN A.DVAJSTCE 



Money should he sent by Postal Order, Draft 
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porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name ana address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a prua/antee of good faith. 



Entered tn the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal 
as second-class matter. 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1901. 



If there is a district which should 
be encouraged to 
An Unwise persevere in its 
Policy attempts to find 

oil it is the dis- 
trict about Hollister. 

As early as 1886 the editor of 
the Pacific Oh Reporter, and 
at that time editor of the Hollister 
Free Lance, had his attention 
called to the geological conditions 
existing in San Benito county, 
which indicated the presence of 
crude petroleum at no great depth. 
In fact we went so far as to en- 
courage and to be the means of 
the investment of considerable 
capital in San Benito county for 
the purpose of drilling a well to 
the oil sand. 

After drilling several hundred 
fleet the well proved to be a 
crooked hole and was abandoned. 

Within the last few years a 
number of the most prominent 
men in Hollister have become in- 
terested in the oil possibilities 
about Hollister, and after having 
the land thoroughly experted by 
the most competent and reliable 
oil authorities have invested their 
money liberally in the attempts to 
drill successful wells. 

Among this number can be 
mentioned T. S. Hawkins, the 
president of the Bank of Hollister; 
Wm. Palmtag, president of the 
Farmers' and Merchants' Bank, 
for years a Supervisor in the 
county, and owner of one of the 
largest and most successful vine- 
yards in the state; R. P. Lathrop, 
who handles most of the hay 
which has made Hollister famous 
throughout the state; Hon. N. C. 
Briggs, a leading attorney of 
Central California, an ex-assembly 
man, and for several terms the 
district attorney of the county of 
San Benito; Hon. Thomas Flint 
Jr., for years a member of the 
Legislature both in the higher as 
well as the lower branch, and for 
two sessions, at least, president 
pro tern of the Senate, and this 
year a prominent candidate for 



Governor. Others of like promi- 
nence could be mentioned if 
necessary to show that men of 
certain character believe oil can 
be found in the neighborhood of 
Hollister. 

Several wells have been drilled, 
and each well has furnished abund- 
ant indications of the presence of 
oil. There has been much gas, 
thick strata of shale filled with sea 
shells, and some oil sand contain- 
ing oil has been struck. 

Each well, however, has been 
spoiled, either through bad man- 
agement, incompetent drillers, bad 
luck or some cause. 

This, however, does not prove 
that oil does not exist, or that it 
cannot be obtained by drilling 
deep enough in the Hollister dis- 
trict. 

That there are some who think 
it can be obtained is proved by 
the fact that the Hollister Petro- 
leum Development Company has 
a well down 760 feet, and that this 
week the San Benito Crude Oil 
company is erecting a derrick and 
will commence drilling as soon as 
possible. 

Another company which has a 
derrick erected, a line of water 
pipe laid, and other improvements 
perfected is the Hollister Crude 
Oil Company, ci which the presi- 
dent and general manager is Mr. 
C. J. Tallon, of San Francisco, the 
dealer in iron and steel. The 
vice-president is J. W. Richards, 
dealer in cooperage stock, and for 
years president of the city trustees 
of Berkeley; the treasurer is F. H. 
Huddart, of the Safe Deposit 
building. The other directors were 
Carl Elving, the real estate dealer 
in the Examiner building; R. P. 
Lathrop, manager of the Lathrop 
Hay Company of Hollister; Hon. 
Brewton A. Hayne, a San Fran- 
cisco attorney and city attorney of 
the city of Berkeley. 

No one can say a word against 
the integrity or business ability of 
the gentlemen at the head of the 
Hollister Crude Oil Company. 

While the attempts thus far 
made to find oil near Hollister 
have thus far proved futile, yet it 
is scientifically certain oil is there, 
and will be struck sooner or later. 

When oil is found the effect 
upon Hollister and the surround- 
ing country will be very beneficial. 
At present it is a prosperous little 
town of 1800 people. It depends 
chiefly upon agriculture, though 
lately a number of orchards 
have come into bearing and added 
materially to the prosperity of the 
community. But the town needs 
new life, rew industries — some- 
thing that will add to its wealth 
and population. 

The progressive and intelligent 
have been and are in hopes that 
oil would be discovered near by in 
such quantities as would make 
pipe lines, tank facilities, machine 
shops, etc., necessary, and bring 
to Hollister a large increase of 
trade and population, and cause it 
to become known not only as an 



agricultural region but as one of 
the great oil districts of California. 
To this end the leading citizens 
have been working. With this 
object in view they have spent 
their time and their money; have 
made frequent trips to this city 
and elsewhere in order to interest 
outside capital in what they be- 
lieved and still believe to be le- 
gitimate oil enterprises. 

These facts being as they are, 
and those engaged in oil enter- 
prises near Hollister being men of 
high standing as they are, it is 
hard to believe that a local paper 
would endeavor to cast reproach 
upon the local oil enterprise and 
malign the character of those en- 
gaged in it. 

In its last issue the Free Lance 
contained the' following: 

We received a letter last week, from 
John W. Hann, editor of the "Breeze," at 
Wauneta, Neb., asking for infoimation 
regarding Tallon's Hollister Crude Oil 
company, and enclosing copies of ads., 
writeups and circulars that have been 
published and spread broadcastth rough- 
out that section. According to the e 
papers work is being actively prosecuted 
in the Crude Oil company, and there 
are millions in sight for prospective in- 
vestors. Mr. Hann received, by return 
mail, a true statement of the conditions 
prevailing in this oil district, and he was 
set aright upon the value of Hollister 
Crude Oil stock. 

The truth of the matter is that 
the Breeze published an advertise- 
ment of the Hollister Crude Oil 
company, which absolutely con- 
tained no misstatements, nor held 
out any baits for the unwary. No 
glittering promises were made, 
and no methods were adopted 
which could in any way bring 
discredit upon the company or 
upon the gentlemen composing 
the directorate. 

Why the Free Lance should try 
to hinder the sale of stock, thus 
retard the development work of 
the company, and thus delay the 
possible growth and prosperity of 
the community in which it is pub 
lished, is a matter hard to under- 
stand. 

No land near Hollister has 
better oil indications than that of 
the Hollister Crude Oil Company 
No company has at its head better 
or more reliable men. 

The reason the company is not 
now drilling is because it has not 
sold sufficient stock to warrant it 
in buying a rig and commencing 
active work. The company does 
not believe in starting its drill and 
then being obliged from lack of 
funds to either stop work or levy 
an assessment, as other companies 
have been compelled to do. 

Hollister has been troubled in 
times past with "knockers" who 
would apparently try to defeat 
any project which might result in 
the public good. Other communi- 
ties have suffered likewise, and in 
some instances the local papers 
have sided with the "knockers' " 
fraternity. 

It is to be hoped Hollister does 
not contain any papers of that 
class. 



Every one will be glad when the 

combine makes up its 

Making mind whether to give 

Trouble, up or to go ahead. At 

present the scheme is 

working great detriment to the oil 

industry on account of the feeling 

of uncertainty as to its probable 

success or failure. In regard to 

its effect on the local Kern field 

the Californian says: 

Many companies in the local field have 
suspended operations pending the settle g 
ment of the combine question. It i s 
probable that as soon as the question i t 
determined one way or the other tha 
there will be considerable work started 
up. 

Those chiefly interested in the 
enterprise, like Mr. Porter, its 
promoter, profess to entertain no 
doubt as to its ultimate complete 
success. Others equally in a posi- 
tion to know assert unequivocally 
the combine is dead. 

There you are. Is it defunct or 
not ? Is the combine going to run 
the Standard Oil out of business 
or not ? Is it going to control 80 
per cent of the oil product or is it 
not? Will it gobble up all the 
small producers or will they pre- 
fer to take their chances between 
the devil and the deep sea — the 
Standard and the ccmbine? 

These are questions that ought 
to be decided— the sooner the 
better. 



The last weekly report of J. W. 
Harrison, the 
From the coal broker, 

Enemy's Camp, has the fol- 
lowing: "All 
sorts of mechanism and devices 
are being framed with the view to 
utilizing fuel oil for domestic pur- 
poses. So far they are a complete 
failure, and the writer thinks they 
will remain so. Fuel oil is grad- 
ually absorbing the steam trade of 
San Francisco. There is little coal 
being delivered in shore for steam 
producing. All the coal that is 
utilized for steam is delivered off 
shore in lighters, barges, etc., for 
steamer and transport use. When 
steamers commence to adopt oil as 
their fuel the sale of coal will be- 
come very little for other than do- 
mestic purposes." 

Mr. Harrison is right about fuel 
oil, and is partly right in regard to 
oil used for domestic purposes. 

Up to the present no burner has 
been discovered for use in a cook- 
ing stove that makes it possible to 
broil meats and fish or to toast 
bread. A cook who will fry a 
steak is a bad cook. What is a 
striped bass unless it is broiled ? 
To attempt to broil a steak or a 
fish over any oil burner yet in- 
vented will spoil it. It will taste 
bad and smell worse. That is the 
case with every oil burner we 
have seen yet. If we are wrong 
we would like to be convinced to 
the contrary. The oil burner for 
cooking purposes is not yet per- 
fected. It took years to perfect 
the gas stove. The oil stcve has 
only been in existende about two 
years. Attempt after attempt is 
now being made to perfect it. 
Some of these attempts will be 
successful. Then Mr, Harrison's 
criticism will be untenable, and 
the use of oil for domestic pur- 
poses will amount to thousands of 
barrels a week in this State alone. 



RK PORTER 



OIL SMELLER WANTED. 



(Ml District* Which Require An 
Infallible Expert. 

jot. 

WW you kiudlj pal mr in minimi 
ration with • gentleman who li is bad 
amplr experience in locating oil wells, 
anil who can visit th 'h the 

same object in view. 

Thanking vou in ai 
kimlntss, I -nl\. 

merly the oil smeller found 
a welcome abode and profitable 
occupation in this country and 
pretentious professors of oleology 
were thicker than whiskers in a 
I'opulist community. But the 
spread of intelligence caused the 
liispersion of the Oil Smeller, and 
oil smelling in those regions where 
oil is actually produced has fallen 
into desuetude. 

For real genuine oil smelling we 
commend to the gracious considera- 
tion of our esteemed correspond- 
ent Captain Lucas, of Beaumont, 
whose proboscular efforts in this 
line have placed him in the very 
front rank of oil sraeilers. There 
is Patillio Higgius, also of Texas, 
who has a nose for oil and a miud 
imbued, as some say, with a spirit 
Sf prophesy. We must not omit 
from our list the very nosegay of 
oil smellers, Hop. Marquis Lafay- 
ette Lockwood, of Terry and Zeli- 
enople. Lockwood's nose, so to 
say, being put, temporarily, out of 
joint by his lack of success in 



Orange, tne a 

change, and offer his services at 
Lake Charles at cut rates. Should 
others fail, we hold in reserve the 
great and only Jon 

rirk 

1 see by clipping* from the Derrick, 
published in here, that the 

oil nun gut a large number of drj 
during the mont' ruber. Now 

th.it is entirely unnecessary. I am the 
invenl locat- 

ing petroleum in the ground, thai never 
the i li.unii 
i . in a separate Enclosure 1 
ulara and literature, if 
enienl for yon to put 
| tlicm into the him. Is o( oil men I would be 
pleased to have you do so, as it will help 



thein. 



Yours truly, O. H.JONES, 



Expert Petroleumologist ami Locator. 

Room .'2o, 2 in S. Broadway. 

This concludes our list of ex- 
pert oil smellers. If our corre- 
spondent is wise as he is cautious, 
he will do as Drake and Lucas 
did, as all pioneers are compelled 
to do, close his eyes and go it 
blind. Not even Carachrisli or 
any other so-called expert geolo- 
gist could do better. — Oil City 
Derrick. 



POINT RICHMOND. 



New 



Industries Rapidly Develop- 
ing the Town. 

Developments are rapidly going 
forward at Point Richmond, both 
by the Standard Oil Company and 
the Santa Fe Railroad Company. 
The Standard is completing a spur 
a mile long, over the marsh, from 



the roundhouse to the oil com- 
pany's refinery site, Five hundred 
men will soon be :<t work on the 
refinery, which will be the third 
largest in the United States 
Simultaneously, work on the pipe 
liue from Bakerslield is to begin. 
There are no accommodations at 
Polnl Richmond for the men to be 
employed. BO they will be carried 
back and forth from San h'raueisco 
by boat, with a work-train to con- 
them from th.> Point Rich- 
'mond terminal to the Standard Oil 
! Company's land. 

The contract for grading for the 
refinery, which was let to Krickson 
& Son, has been canceled, and a 
new contract let to E. B. and A. 
I.. Stone. They are to cut out the 
gap from the works to the bay, 
and are also to build the new 
wharf, which will be 3200 feet 
long and will cost $100,000. It 
will be L-shaped, running out to 
deep water and thence southward. 
All the Jiills between the Santa 
Fe terminal and the Standard Oil 
Company's new wharf, to the 
northward are to be leveled. 

The Santa Fe, says the Chroni- 
cle, is now considering an arcade 
depot at the end of the terry slip 
at Point Richmond. It is modeled 
somewhat after Oakland mole, and 
will be 200 by 400 feet in size. 
Piers lor the new building are 
now being built. The contract is 
held by B. Lantry'sSons of Strong 
City, Kas., who also hold the con- 
tract for improving China basin. 



'The Santa Fe will also build brie 
shops to replace the frame one 
recently burned. The new shops 
will be four times as large as the 
old ones, with three engine pits 

j for repairing locomotives. In 
place of the 150 men now at work 
between 300 and 400 will be em- 
ployed in the shops. The Santa 
l-'e has 250 acres of ground, and is 
laying out fine railroad yards. 
Large oil tanks have been put in, 
and such improvements made as 
to show that the terminal at Point 
Richmond will be one of the 
busiest points on the whole system. 
The town of Richmond is grt>w- 
ing rapidly Another town called 
Sauta Fe has been laid out. About 
2000 people are in that section, 
where a little over a year ago 
there were no people at all. A 
daily paper is to be started the 
first of the year. 



Oil Fuel is Cheap. 

The oil burning plant has been 
placed in operation at the pump- 
ing station in Stockton and very 
satisfactory results are being ob- 
tained. One barrel of oil, which 
is purchased under contract for a 
year at 70 cents per barrel, runs 
the plant for a day. Heretofore 
the expenditure for coal amounted 
to about $6 per day. The saving 
to the city is quite large. 



Now the days are shortening, 
the price of oil is strengthening. 



***rNrV*r*Ar*VWSA*rWV>rV>rVV**>Ar*V>^V>/»r^^r*<»^*/V\^ 



Choice Oil Land for Sale 

We have been authorized to sell three pieces of land in Section 13, Township 29, Range 28, in that portion of the 

Kern River Oil district known as 

SOUTH OF KERN RIVER 

7 ^? ^ «?:«?■: ^9 ^9 9^^- * 

It is all patented land and the title is guaranteed. 

The Chicago Extension is now drilling on the land adjoining, with every prospect of striking oil. 

The Wizard Oil Company is drilling southwest of us. 

The Panorama had 150 feet of oil sand on Section 14, adjoining us, but lost the well. 

The land is only a mile south of Discovery well, where oil was first struck in the Kern River District. 

There is no doubt but that with a proper rig for drilling in the soft formations oil will be struck here at about 1500 feet. 

We will sell this land in a body, or will split it up into three pieces. 

We are able to offer it for a short time only at 

$60 PER ACRE 

This is over 50 per cent lower than any land is offered in this portion of the district. 



EASY TERMS 



EASY TERMS 



For maps and further information apply to 



THE PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



*++++++++j^*++j^/****^Vs*t+*fs*/*/^^ 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



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Asthmalene Brings Instant Relief and Permanent 
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CHAINED 

FOR TEN 
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RELIEF. 



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Rabbi oi Cong Bnai Israel. 
New York, Jan. 3, 1901. 
Drs. Taft Bros'. Medicine Co. 

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After having it carefully analyzed we can state that 
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REV. DR. MORRIS WECHSI/ER. 



Avon Springs, N. Y„ Feb. I, 1901. 
Dr. Taft Bros. Medicine Co. 

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Street, New York City. 



BUY OR SELL 
CALIFORNIA 

OIL STOCKS 



. . . THROUGH . , 



JOSEPH B.T0PL1TZ 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange. 
Member California Petroleum Miners' Association. 

330 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Orders for Buying and Selling California Oil Stocks 
Promptly Attended to. 

Reliable information on Oil Stocks Furnished Gratis. 

Unlisted Stocks a specialty. 

Correspondence Solicited. 

Reference — California Safe Deposit & Trust Co., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



For Sale Cheap 
10,(00, or Less, Shares California Crude. 

Any Reasonable Offer Will Be Accepted 



A LAND SUIT. 



Claims Ownership to all of Sec- 
tion 5, 29-28. 

E. B. Coggins has commenced a 
suit in the superior coilrt against 
the Southern Pacific company that 
will cause some consternation 
among the oil companies operat- 
ing in the Kern River oil field. 

The San Joaquin Oil and De- 
velopment company, the Monte 
Cristo Oil and Development com- 
pany, the Cortez Oil company, the 
Section Five Oil company, and the 
Mercedes Oil and Development 
company, who claim interest in 
the property involved, are made 
parties defendant to the action. 

The plaintiff in this action, who 
is a resident of Honolulu, claims 
ownership of the property of the 
defendants named, and in his com- 
plaint avers that on July 14, 1887, 
the defendant Southern Pacific 
company was the owner of the 
following described property: W ^ 
of section 5, township 29 south, 
range 28 east. 

The plaintiff alleges that on the 
date mentioned the defendant rail- 
road company entered into a con- 
tract with one Hugh Wilson, 
whereby the railroad company 
agreed to sell and convey to Wil- 
son all ot the property described, 
payable 20 per cent at the time of 
the execution of the contract, 
together with one year's interest 
in advance on the remainder, and 
the balance with interest at the 
rate of 7 per cent. That upon the 
execution of the contract Wilson 
paid the defendant railroad com- 
pany the 20 per cent of the pur- 
chase price, together with one 
year's interest upon the balance 

The plaintiff alleges that on 
August 27, 1877, Wilson assigned 
and conveyed to plaintiff the con- 
tract and ever since then the | 
plaintiff has been and he yet is 
the owner and holder thereof. 

It is alleged, says the Echo, that 
on May 6, 1901, the plaintiff ten- 
dered to defendant railroad com- 
pany $1,700, the sum being more 
than the whole amount due upon 
the contract at that time and 
offered in writing to pay the same 
and demanded that the company 
convey to plaintiff the land, but 
the defendant refused. The plain- 
tiff alleges that he is willing to 
pay whatever may be due to de- 
fendant upon the contract. 

The plaintiff alleges that the 
defendants San Joaquin Oil and 
Development company, Cortez Oil 
company, Section Five Oil com- 
pany and the Mercedes Oil and 
Development company claim an 
interest in the property adverse to 
plaintiff; they assert that under 
the defendant railroad company 
they have acquired certain rights 
in the premises, but the plaintiff 
alleges that whatever claims and 
interests they have are all subordi- 
nate to his rights under the con- 
tract, and he avers that at the 
time or times when defendants 
severally acquired such interests 



they had notice of the contract and 
of all the plaintiff's rights there- 
unto. 

The plaintiff prays that the true 
amount due the defendant com- 
pany upon the contract may be 
ascertained and determined and 
that upon the payment of same 
the plaintiff may be permitted to 
purchase the land described and 
that the defendant company may 
be required to execute unto the 
plaintiff a deed for the same and 
that the defendant oil companies, 
already named, may be declared 
to have no right, title, interest or 
estate in the premises. 

Hiram W. Johnson and Albert 
M. Johnson are the attorneys for 
the plaintiff. 



A String to It. 

The stockholders of the Reed 
Crude Oil company last week 
voted to join- the combine provided 
certain conditions were fulfilled. 
Briefly stated, the deeds to the 
real estate and personal property 
of the Reed Crude are to be 
deposited in escrow with the Union 
Trust company of San Francisco, 
and if on January 1, 1902 similar 
action has been taken by the San 
Joaquin, Whittier & Green, the 
Canfield and the Kern companies, 
then the transfer will be made by 
the documents passing into the 
possession of the combine; a failure 
on the part of these other com- 
panies or others of equivalent 
standing, to have deposited their 
deeds in escrow by that date is to 
relieve the Reed Crude from re- 
sponsibility, and the deal will be 
off. That the deal will be off, and 
the Reed Crude withdrawn from 
the combine is an assured fact, 
for John A Bunting, President of 
the San Joaquin Oil company and 
as shrewd and successful a man as 
there is in the oil business, says he 
will have nothing to do with it. 

The Reed Crude people were 
wise. They said they would join 
the combine provided other com- 
panies, of which the San Joaquin 
was one, would also join. 

The San Joaquin will not join. 

The Reed Crude people can 
commence right now to haul in on 
their string. 



Union Refinery. 

The prospect of the Union Oil 
company to erect a refinery of 
wonderful proportions on section 
8, 29-28, is no longer a matter of 
conjecture, as workmen and teams 
have already been engaged to be- 
gin grading for the works. Sev- 
eral local teamsters left Bakers- 
field early Monday morning to be- 
gin work for the company and it 
is said the work will be rapidly 
pushed toward completion.! 

As has already been stated the 
plant will have a capacity of 1,600 
or 1,800 barrels daily, The oil, 
says the Californian, will be re- 
duced to distillates and liquid as- 
phaltum at this refinery, the for- 
mer to be sent to Rodeo for the 
extraction of the kerosene it con- 
tains. 



TH1 . OIL RKPORTKR 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 

Recent Developments In Oil In Various Parts 
of the State. 



The following wort 
about Alcalde, the terminal of the spni 
track from Hanford to « -mlnij;.!, 
log to a cor respondent of the I 
geJes Herald i 

Mount Hamilton company have been 
drilling, and the Plymouth company re 
cently put in its first rig. The Mount 
Hamilton i d with 

the outlook that three strings of tools 
N i. i is com- 
pleted, which will be very SOOn, A year 
ago the Badgei State Oil company, a 
Minn* drilled to a depth 

of 700 feet on section 1, 21-14 and then 
abandoned il on account ol water and 
running sand. The Bawkeye State com 
pan y of boa Angeles had two wells on 
section 6. but one was abandoned and 
work suspended on the other. The May 
brothers g t a small quantity of light 
oil ut (>co feet in a thin streak t»f sand, 
hut gave up in despair. The Rommel 
and Westlake company of I, us Angeles 
has a well in section 2, 21-14 upon win. h 
work is suspended. The Star Oil com- 
pany of San Francis* ver 600 
feet through a blue shale formation, but 
also suspended. The Sunny side Oil 
company of West Virginia has a well oa 
the southeast quarter of section 35, 2-14 
which was carried down 700 feet, and 
a second and third on section 1, 21-14, 
from each of which small amounts of 
green oil have been obtained, having a 
specific gravity of 24 degrees. Then to 
complete the list the Wright Association 
of Downey I,os Angeles County, drilled 
a 900-foot well on section 26, 20-14, close 
to the Whittier & Green well, but it also 
was abandoned on account of water. 

HUMBOLDT. 

The Hoagland oil well is to resume 
work in a few days. There are four 
teams out for casing and as soon as it 
arrives they will begin drilling again. 

KERN. 

The Bald Eagle has finished a new 
well on section 30. 

Well No. 11 of the Peerless Oil com- 
pany struck oil last Monday. 

The Illinois Crude has commenced 
drilling well No. 2. No. 1 is doing 400 
barrels. 

The Vanderlip, 25, 28-27, is rigging up 
for work 011 No. 2. Drilling commenced 
this week. 

The Mecca will soon commence work 
01119. It completed its fourth well on 
29 last week. 

The Red Bank on 4, 29-28 will drill 
more wells, and also construct a large 
cement tank for storage. 

The Provident has finished its well on 
section 25, 28-27 aut l the well is good for 
at least 100 barrels daily. 

Tremont No. 2 in Sunset is workiug in 
a very favorable formation with the in 
dications of an early strike. Well No. 1 
is flowing a few barrels per day. 

The Mascot has entered a prolific 
stream of oil at the depth of 700 feet in 
its well in the center of the northeast 
quarter of 26, $2-2$, leased from the Mt. 
Diablo in the Midway. 

The Rinconado, on the plains north of 
Sunset City, will soon be at work again. 
The company suspended operations a 
few months ago, but arrangements have 
now been made to complete the well. 

The American Girl ou 7, Ji-23, is still 



down in rich sand and th< 
Dg the theory thai the width of the 
strike at Sunset is much more than it 
has been thought to he by most people. 

mpany, which be* 
pudding In on 2. 11-94 expects to 
soon be among the number of producers 
of the rapidly growing Sunset Held. 
The < tblspo is operating on a lease of the 
Monarch. 

The management of the Medina com- 
pany, on No, 3, 11-24, will finish v 

which Is in the sand, and go on with the 
further development of its lease. This 
company is allied with the Nan'icokc 
company. 

The American Girl No. r, 7, 11-23, has 
suspended after just touching the first 
sand. 11 will be necessary, probably, to 

pull the seven and five-eighths casing 
and under- ream before further progress 
can be made. 

The No. 3 rig of the Occidental com 
pany will be in use soon, the company's 
efforts heretofore having been concen- 
trated on the work of finishing Nos. 
and 2. The No. 3 rig has been in place 
for several months. 

The American Girl Oil company is 
drilling its well at Sunset down to the 
second sand. About a thirty-barrel pro 
ducer was found in the first sand. After 
this well is completed the American Boy 
well will be finished. 

The Obispo Oil company, operating 
on the lease of the Monarch, is down 
350 feet. Considerable difficulty has 
been experienced in gettiug in the hole 
down to this depth, the company having 
had three fishing jobs. 

The West Shore company, operating 
ou 32, 28-28, in the Kern River field, is 
now paying monthly dividends of 5 per 
cent, says the Californian, and will be 
enabled to do so for about a year and a 
half, out of funds already accumulated. 
The excess in the treasury amounts to 
something more than Jtoo.ooo. 

The Spring is having considerable 
trouble at its well on the south side of 
the river. The drill penetrated a very 
good stratum of sand, but a string of 
tools and two spears have lodged iu the 
vicinity of the bottom of the well and 
until these are removed no further pro- 
gress can be made with the drill. An 
effort is now being made to fish out the 
tools. 

J. M. El wood, who drilled a number 
of wells iu the Kern field after the dis- 
covery well, says these wells have been 
continuously on the beim for twenty- 
seven, months and their output is as 
large as ever. As these wells only 
tapped the first sand and are great pro- 
ducers now the interesting question 
arises: How long the wells which have 
tapped two or three sands will last? 

The Bakersfield Echo agrees with the 
Paciiic On. REPORTER in believing 
an immense oil district is to be opened 
up south of the river. T11 a recent issue 
it says: 

"The Wizard of Kern River is pre- 
paring to go deeper in its well on sec- 
tion 26, 29-2S. The drill has already 
reached a depth of nearly 1300 feet, but 
as no strike has yet been made the com- 
pany has decided to go to the 1800 level, 
unless oil in paying quantities is sooner 
discovered. The six-inch string of pipe 
has been pulled out and an effort will be 
made to send the eight-inch down to the 
point reached by the six. It is stated 
that tli is can be accomplished and a 



Disked up with « I tsing. 

The 1 hopeful ol 

ind the pred made 

that the sand will be found within the 
three hundred fe 

I I. IS 

The Western star < >il company, with 
lUon cast of the property of the 
I'nente oil company, has resumed drill- 
ing after a shut down ol several months. 

Prof. W, 1.. Watts, who is well known 

in Whittier, recently made a two week's 
trip into the I'nente Hills southeast of 
this city in the interests of the Oliuda 

OH com pa 03 . 

( ontractor Collins has begun spud 
ding on No. (< tor the Warner Oil com- 
pany, The company's latest new well, 
No. 5, is proving to be an excellent pro- 
ducer. 

The Wbittier-Flllmore company's well 
on the Pubbs-Evans tract is down ovei 
1000 feet. The second string of casing 

has just been put in and the hole is in 
excellent Bbape 

The latest from the Whittier field ac- 
cording to the News is as follows: 

Contractor Richard McConnell is ex- 
periencing some trouble with water in 
the two wells Nos. 31 aud 33, which he 
is drilling for the Central Oil company. 

Contractor Richard McConnell has 
thus far made good progress with the 
well that he is drilling for the Union Oil 
company on the Sansenena ranch. The 
hole is now down over 500 feet and it has 
not yet been necessary to put in any 
casing. 

The Raymond Oil company is still ex- 
periencing considerable difficulty with its 
200 foot well on section 25. The sand in 
the fluid is so sharp that it cuts the 
valves of the pump so quickly that it 
has been impossible to ascertain any- 
thing of possible production. 

One of the best outlooks for a well is 
on the property of the New England Oil 
company which has reached a depth of 
over 1700 feet with No. 2, the last 100 in 
good oil sand. This property is in new 
territory and a well would have a tend- 
ency to start a renewal of operations in 
the locality. 

The East Wbittier Oil company is go- 
ing down in excellent shape with No. 2 
since drilling began with the new wire 
cable. A short fishing job delayed work 
for a few days the first of the week but 
the obstruction, a bailer, was success- 
fully removed and drilling has been re- 
sumed. 

The Wbittier Oil and Development 
company's well in the East Whittier dis- 
trict is down nearly 1200 feet. Small 
strata of oil sand are being penetrated 
by the drill but the quantity of grease 
is onlylarge enough to encourage further 
operations. The company has made a 
contract to put the hole down to a depth 
of 1500 feet. 

The Home Oil company is experienc- 
ing trouble with No. 13, the formation 
at this location being the worst that has 
been encountered on the company's 
property. Good progress has been made 
on the work of deepening No. 10 and 
the well should be completed 2000 feet. 
The company has already obtained a per- 
mit from the City Council and as soon as 
there is a rain to soften the ground will 
begin the work of putting in a three-inch 
pipe line from its wells to the Southern 
Pacific Station where a 1000-barrel tank 
will be located. 

Contractor S. F. Cady, who is putting 
dowu a well with a portable rig and hy- 
draulic jacks on the Palo Solo Oil com 
pany's lease, is making but slow pro- 
gress. The company itself put down 
one hole to a depth of 800 feet with a 
standard rig and the formation for nearly 
the entire distance was sticky adobe. 
For this reason it was believed that a 



small rig using strong jacks and 
pipe casing would drill a hole easier lb 
the big outfit with heavy casing. \ lo 
cation was selected only a few feet dis- 
tant from the derrick for the new at- 
tempt and ;he result has been just the 
Opposite from what was expected lor the 
contractor has encountered nothing but 
rock and water ever since he commenced 
lo drill. He has made less than 300 feet 
of hole but lias put OU a heavier too] and 
expects to make better headway in the 
future. 

A Whittier oil company that lias been 
meeting with excellent success during 
the past six months is the Whittier 
Crude. The company has put down 
tour wells but until recently the pro- 
ductiou was comparatively small, Some 
months ago well No. 1 was deepened, a 
rich sand was struck and the production 
greatly increased. The well was put 011 
the pump for a short time but is now 
again being deepened with the best 
prospects of further increasing the 
capacity. The hole is now down 1600 
feel and still in the sand. The Frampton 
Brothers who are drilling No. 5 for this 
company, already have put down one of 
the best holes in the field. There are 
only three strings of casing iu use and 
the jfi is over 1400 feet long. The well 
if put on the pump at the present time 
would make a good producer and will 
probably be temporarily "finished" in 
the near future, but it is the company's 
intention to have the hole carried down 
to a depth of 2000 feet. 

MADERA. 
J. S. Manlej*. Secretary of the San 
Joaquin River Oil company, which is 
drilling near Table Mountain, two miles 
northeast of Lane's bridge, in Madera 
county, reports that the drill is down 700 
feet and has passed through 100 feet of 
very hard sandstone, in which the 
workers could only make five feet a day. 
The drill is in blue clay and making 
twenty feet a day. The presence of the 
blue clay is considered to he a good in- 
dication of oil. 

SANTA CRU7. 

The latest report from the well of the 
Crescent Oil company at Chittenden is 
that fifty barrels were pumped from it 
in two days last week and that the oil is 
within a few feet of the top of the casing. 

The Gilroy Oil company commenced 
drilling on their property eight miles 
southwest of Gilroy last week. That the 
property is in the oil belt is evident from 
the fact that three miles south of its 
site and in a direct line oil has been 
struck on the Chittenden property, and 
two miles north of it petroleum gas has 
been struck on the Gaffey lands. 

J. R. Allen of Boston, Mass., president 
of the Crescent Oil company, was in 
Watsonville last week, accompanied by 
J. W. Forgeous of Santa Cruz, J. L. 
Buell of San Jose and h. Scupham of 
San Francisco. They left for the Santa 
Barbara oil districts Saturday night. 
Mr. Allen came out from Boston to in- 
vestigate the oil showing of his com- 
pany's well at Chittenden. 

SAN BERNARDINO. 

The McGimpsy well, being sunk on 
the Cole and Harris ranch, is now down 
to a depth of 925 feet, and the drill is 
pounding through twenty-one feet every 
day. Every preparation has been made 
to carry the well to a depth of 1200 feet, 
and the company has announced its in- 
tention to goto 2000 feet before abandon- 
ing the effort to strike oil. 

SAN BENITO. 
The derrick builders of the San Benito 
Crude Oil company are expected to ar- 
rive today. 

The Ashurt is working two shifts with 
the veterans Fredenberg and Brad field 
as drillers. 

Operations have been temporarily sus- 



PACIFIC OiL REPORTER 



pended upon the well of the Hollister 
Petroleum Development company. The 
company is up against a hard proposition 
in the shape of a "spear" that is laying 
at the bottom of the 700- foot hole. The 
"spear" was rented from a San Fran- 
cisco firm, at $10 per day, to draw some 
casing from the well, but broke loose 
from its fastenings. Should it not be 
recovered the company will have to pay 
$200 for it. The Free Lance says the 
outlook is very gloom}', and it is proba- 
ble that the present well will be aban- 
doned, and a new one bored. 

The rig builders of the San Benito 
Crude Oil company, arrived last Satur- 
day and went to work Monday on the 
O. C. Towle place near Emmett, under 
direction of C. W. Fox, the company's 
expert. As soon as this rig is finished 
Mr. Fox will send them to the Merrill 
place and from there they will go to 
the O'Hara ranch about six miles above 
Paicines. 

LATEST COAST NEWS. 



CONTRA COSTA. 
The Berkeley Crude is going down 
with 7 5-8 casing. 

The American is down over 1100 feet 
in oil sand with snne oil. 

The Grand Pacific company will com- 
mence again immediately on their well 
near Lafayette. 

The National Paraffine Oil company's 
well is down a little over goo feet with the 
drill in sandstone formation. There is 
lots of gas in the well and a good show- 
ing of oil. 

FRESNO. 

Mercantile No. 1 is drillng. 

The Echo well in Warthan had a fish- 
ing job last week. 

The Aetna company will resume work 
in a few weeks. 

The Caribou Oil company has refused 



an offer of 45 cents for the product of 
that group on a five-year contract. 

Oil City Petroleum No. 5 is drilling, 
and the well will be a good one. 

Fresno-San Francisco is sending down 
the string of tools in No. 1. 

The El Capitan wells are being con- 
nected with the Maine State pipe line. 

Philadelphia-San Francisco No. 1 is 
making hole rapidly and will no doubt 
be in the sand in a few days. 

No. 5 on "28" is 1250 feet deep, with 
nine hundred feet of oil in the hole. 
This well promises to be a great pro- 
ducer. 

An under-reanier has stuck in the 
lower end of the five-inch casing of the 
Commercial well. Two week's fishing 
has failed to bring it up. 

The Investment company is laying 
water pipe connecting site of new rig 
with the Coaliuga Water company's 
main rig, in course of construction. 

"The California Oil Felds" (Imitd) 
camp is a lively one. Four wells are 
drilling. This company has the finest 
camp in the world — no exception. 

The London company in the Fresno- 
San Benito district is stiU waiting on the 
result of wells being drilled on each side 
of them. 

On section 2S, one of the famed lo- 
calities, Shannon is down in well No. 5 
to a depth of 1250 feet, and there is 900 
feet of oil in the hole. The drill will be 
sent down still deeper. 

The Fresno- Alpha well, in the Fresno 
San Benito district, in 22, 16-12, is down 
a little over 1000 feet, with considerable 
oil in the well. Work is steadily pro- 
gressing. 

The Gibbs Oil company has sold its 
entire outfit, consisting of rig, tools and 
machinery to to the Sanborn Oil com- 
pany. The Gibbs operated last year on 



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• MANUFACTURERS OF - 



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Natural Gas Plants a Specialty. 

Cable address, "Boang." ABC and Private Codes. 



BRADFORD, PA., U. S. A. 



21-17, which was known as the Sand Hill 
district. 

Blue Diamond No I will possibly re- 
sume work soon. This well was started 
several months ago and after drilling a 
short time was shut down. This hole 
may be finished by contract. 

The shipments of oil from this field 
during the month of October were only 
173 cars, an average of only a little un- 
der six cars per day. when it should be 
twenty-five cars per day. as orders are in 
for that amount. 

If we could get transportation we 
could not supply the present demand for 
Coalinga oil. The oil business of this 
state reached its lowest ebb a few weeks 
ago, since which time it has been gradu- 
ally moving upward and it is our candid 
belief that in another sixty days it will 
have reached a point wherein those com- 
panies as can will resume operations and 
new ones will be formed to operate in 
this field. 

The pipe line connecting the Maine 
State Oil company's wells with Ora 
.station has been completed and fully 
equipped with tanks, loading rack and 
switch, and this company will soon be 
shipping oil. The line consists of four- 
inch pipe. Through the first half a 
mile the oil is forced by pump to a 2000- 
barrel storage tank. From this tank the 
oil runs to Ora very readily, having a fall 
of over 200 feet in a distance of five 
miles. The loading tank at Ora has a 
capacity of one thousand barrels and is 
now full of oil. A seven and seven- 
eighths string of casing connects this 
tank with the loading rack and five and 
five-eighths casing is used through 
which the oil will run from rack to cars. 
The loading rack will accommodate only 
three cars at present, but will be made 
longer when necessary. Oil will be 
transferred from wells of several other 
companies over this line in a few months. 
— Coalinga Derrick. 

KERN. 

The Illinois Crude has started on its 
second well. Well No. 1 is good for 400 
barrels. 

The Mascot, on 26, 32-23, has a good 
well. The drill is still going down. Oil 
rose 300 feet in the casing. 

The 1901 company in 34, 30-22 will try 
its luck again in a second hole. The 
first well was only a small producer. 

A board of appraisers is to be sent to 
McKittrick district immediately for the 
purpose of inventorying and appraising 
the various holdings with a view to 
taking them into the proposed combine. 

The machinery for the Pacific Oil 
Refinery, located near the corner of 
Fifteenth and Oak streets, Bakersfield, 
is expected to arrive frcm the east soon. 
It was shipped several days ago. Upon 
its arrival the Webster Iron Works, 
which has the contract for installing it, 
will begin at once in placing it in order 
and preparing it for the first work. The 
brick work has been completed. ' 

OKANGK. 
The Brea Canyon Oil company has 
declared the regular monthly dividend 
of three per cent. 

SANTA BARBARA. 

On the Harris rancho a 9*5 casing is 
being drawn from the Graciosa well, and 
an n^ casing is to be put down. This! 
well is down 500 feet. The Prima Vera] 
company, operating on the Underhill ! 
rancho, has had to contend against a, 
heavy flow of water, but has now sue- 
ceeded in shutting it off. The drills are ' 
now working at 750 feet, and are to be I 
sent down with all speed. 

The managers of the Western Union 
Oil company have, after much difficulty, 
succeeded in drying out its well, No. 2, 
on the Carreaga rancho, and drilling to 
carry the well to greater depth will be .at 
once begun. The intention according to 



the Santa Barbara News, is to drill to a 
depth of 3000 feet, in the hope that a 
great pressure and quantity of oil will he 
found. This means that No. 2 is to be a 
test of the oil region in which it is 
located. At the greatest depth attained, 
about 2200 feet, the hole was still in 
shale, and it is believed that later on 
there will be a surprising development. 
Well No. 3, near by, is producing from 
125 to 150 barrels a day, while No. 4 is 
down 600 feet, and is rapidly being 
deepened. 

TEHAMA. 

The drillers at the Corning gas well are 
still in very hard formation, and the 
progress downward is necessarily slow, 
but double shifts of drillmen were put 
on last Thursday, and now the work is 
prosecuted day and night. 

TULARE. 

Work is being carried on day and 
night at the La Mese Chiquita oil well 
near Porterville. The report that oil 
had been struck was without foundation, 
but the indications are all that could be 
desired, and it is conSdeutly expected 
that oil will be encountered. The well, 
by actual measurement was 1 158 feet 
deep Sunday, and more headway would 
have been made had it not been neces- 
sary to stop and do some general repair 
work. It is expected now to keep on 
gong ahead with night and day shifts. 

At the annual meeting of stockholders 
of Tulare Oil and Mining company held 
last week the following were elected a 
board of directors for the coming year: 
J.M.Anderson, W. H. Hevren, C. D. 
Richardson, Emmet Barber and H. M. 
Shreve. This company has arranged 
all of its litigation now and has 840 acres 
clear and patentable. Several lessees 
on the tract have wells, but the low price 
of oil has prevented their pumping. 
Now, however, these lessees are putting 
in a pipe line to the railroad, together 
with good storage tanks, and it is 
thought that shipments of oil will soon 
begin. It is thought therefore that 
stockholders will shortly begin to get 
something besides assessments on their 
stock. 

VENTURA. 

The McCray Crude Oil company in 
the upper end of La Jas canyon is pro- 
gressing finely with their oil well, and 
are down 600 feet. 



New Incorporations. 

The following new incorporations were 
filed at the office of the Secretary of 
State last week: 

The California-Fresno Oil company. 
Principal place of business, San Fran- 
cisco. Capital stock, 150,000, with Jioo 
subscribed, and H. H. Hart, W. A. 
Spinks, W. C. Leivitt, E. N. Atwood, 
W. H. Sigourney of San Francisco as 
directors. 

Santa Paula Oil Tool Works. Princi- 
pal place of business, Santa Paula. Di- 
rectors: G. L. Skinner, F. W. Jones, E. 
G. Skinner, Emma J. S. Skinner and 
Eva V. Whitcomb. Capital stock, jf 25,- 
000; subscribed, $50. 

Red Slide Oil company. Principal 
place of business, Sacramento. Direc- 
tors: C. F. Curry, W. J. Elder, H. Mc- 
Williams, C. E. Scheunert, C. N. Post, 
W. H. Govan, H. II. LeBaron, E. Stein- 
man and W. A. Dayton. Capital stock, 
$200,000; subscribed, $900. 

New Franklin Oil and Refining com- 
pany. Principal place of business, Los 
Angeles. Directors: E. H. Greededyke, 
F. A. Nance, J. P. Stockdale, C S. Mann 
and M. P. Phipps. Capital stock, #300,- 
000; subscribed, $500. 

The experts have finished their 
report as to the appraisement of 
the properties in the Kern com- 
bine. It is now up to the com- 
panies. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTHR 



Standard Oil. 

The Standard Oil tank 

cars coming from the Hast very 
shortly. The local age: 
any day to receive word that one 
or more train loads oi pipe for the 
Bakersfield Point Richmond pipe 
line have started. The pipe will 
be shipped from the Hast in train 
load lots as far as made, and the 
work of laying will commence as 
soon as the pipe is received. 



Los Angeleu Stocks. 

The spirit of speculation does 
not appear much in evidence on 
the Los Angeles stock board at the 
present time although a fair vol- 
ume of business has been done 
during the week ending Nov. 9th. 
Several of the better known oil 
stocks have registered small ad- 
vances and the same also may be 
said of a number of the gold aud 
copper stocks. Reed Crude took 
a jump from 34X to 35; i at which 
figure it was fairly strong. Brea 
Canyon has advanced from $3.10 
to $3 20 with none offered at even 
this figure. Central continues to 
decline, while Senator is still weak 
around the dollar mark. Although 
bidding continues for Fullerton 
Consolidated 46 cents failed to 
bring any of this stock out and 
none was offered at less than 65 
cents. Globe has fallen off from 
20 to 17^ cents. Southern Con- 
solidated again sold at 2 cents al 
though little is to be had at this 
figure. Western Union still re- 
mains at 55 asked. A jump from 
5 to 6 cents was registered by 
Westlake, several thousand shares 
going over the board at the latter 
figure. Bidding continues strong 
for Wilson with apparently very 
little in sight. 

Among the mining stocks Butte 
Lode yet remains a favorite, the 
quotations ranging at from $22 }i 
to $35. There appears to be no 
diminution in the demand for Bis- 
bee West copper, buyers offering 
as high as 17 cents, with none to 
be had at less than 22 cents. This 
security was selling as low as 10 
cents less than sixty days ago. 
Black Hill copper and Mingus 
Mountain are also in better de- 
mand. 

There is no particular movement 
among the bank stocks and mis- 
cellaneous securities. 

Canada Refinery. 

The business of refining crude 
oil was started at the works of the 
Canadian Refinery company at 
Petrolia, Ont., Nov. 6, when Mr. 
Riddell, the foreman, started the 
stills go'ng for the first time. Since 
the company was incorporated, 
and decided to engage in the busi- 
ness here, work on the plant has 
been pushed forward as rapidly 
as possible, and although every- 
thing is not yet in first class shape, 
the plaut has been put in a shape 
where the business of refining can 
be proceeded with. New boilers, 
stills, condensor, bleaching tanks 
and agitator are all in position, and 



stills for lubricating oils and 
paraffin are being installed. 

The company have installed a 
dynamo in the works. A large 
1000 candle power arc lamp is 
placed in the middle of the yard, 
and besides this there are some 
forty or fifty incandescent lamps 
placed in position. 

An ample supply of crude oil is 
assured the company, and our 
citizens will rejoice to know that 
once more a refinery is working 
full blast in our midst. — Petrolia 
Advertiser. 



Producers" OH Exchange 

The following were the st". k M 
the Prodao vchaagc In the J 

formal ■enfona held for the week ending 
Wednesday, Sovembei 



APOLLO 






1000 at 

4000 at 

200 at 



»3 



The Standard Rock. 

The Standard Rock Oil Com- 
pany has lost no time in commenc- 
ing operations on the 6,000 acres 
of asplialtum land it has recently 
acquired near Sargents Station, 
just below Oilroy. 

The buildings are erected, and 
the foundations for the refining 
kettles are in place. The kettles 
were sent down this week and 
inside of two weeks the works 
will be completed and shipments 
of asphalt, both refined and crude, 
will commence in carload lots. 

This company has some of the 
best land in the oil districts and ' 
will commence drilling when the 
price of oil warrants its develop- 
ment. At present it will confine 
itself to the asphalt industry which 
will yield quick and satisfactory 
profits and make dividends a cer- 
tainty. 

At present the stock is sold at 
20 cents. As soon as shipments 
of asphalt commence the price 
will be raised to >o cents a share. 



A/ l 

150 at 1 00 

Hi CKHORN 

100 at 3 50 

HEAR I'l.AC. 

too at 05 

BAY CITY. 

1250 at 25 312 5 

CARIBOU. 

lou at 76 

CALIFORNIA STANDARD 



yo Oo 

IOIX' n> 

40 00 



150 00 



350 00 



10 00 



500 .11 



2300 at 

1600 at 

3S8(Soo)at 



23 

FOUR OIL. 

45 

42 

45 

HOME 



oil.. 



50 at 3 35 

300 at 3 40 

ioo(S3o)al 3 40 

HANl'ORIi. 

6 at 102 00 

3 at 101 00 

1 at 103 00 



1 I-, on 



1035 "° 
672 00 

161 10 



167 50 
1020 00 
340 00 

612 
303 00 
103 00 



HANFORD-FRESNO-KERN RIVER. 

100 at 07 7 00 

INDEPENDENCE. 



1000 at 



09 

JUNCTION. 



3000 at 28 

7600 at .27 

30oo(S3o)at 27 

2ioo(Sqo)at 27 

5oo(S90)at 25 

2600 at 26 

iooofScjoJat 26 

23oo( S60) at 26 



Standard Oil Dividend. 

The Standard Oil company has 
declared adividend of $8 pershare, 
payable December 16th, making 
$40 per share for the calender 
year, which is the same amount as 
last year. 



KERN. 



100 at 5 50. 



LION. 



90 00 



840 00 
2052 00 
Xio 00 
567 00 
125 00 
676 00 
260 00 
59S 00 



550 00 



616 

too 00 
ico 00 
77 00 
81 00 
8 00 



To Form An Oil Trust. 

A dispatch from Vienna says: 
The owners of all the petroleum 
works in Galicia have decided to 
form a trust to end the existing 
reckless competition. 



The typical driller or tool dresser, 
the sure-enough, real thing, may 
be defined as an individual who is 
otherwise engaged when not eat- 
ing. 



Pacific Coast Underwriting Company. 

Incorporate companies; furnish 
everything complete. 

Sell interest-bearing Gold Bonds. 

Underwrite stocks. 

Buy and sell Oil Lands. 

Handle all kinds of mining 
properties. 

Information furnished investors 
regarding Pacific Coast Corpora- 
tions. Address, 

Main Office, 507-8-9 Parrott Bldg., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



WANTED 

A good oil company on proven ground. 
Will join with outfit and casing (near 
Hanford) of J2000 to $4000 on ground 
floor. Address, P. O. Box 117, Yisalia, 
Cal. 



=6ot at 11 

1000 (S30)at 10 

1000 at 10 

70o( B90) II 

900 at 09 

106 at 08 

MONARCH OF ARIZONA. 

2 100 at 22 462 00 

>oo(B6o)at 23 4600 

MONTE CRISTO. 

100 at 1 65 165 00 

500 at 1 70 850 00 

OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 



100 at 
100 at 



24 

23 

OCCIDENTAL. 



24 00 
23 00 



500 at 34 170 00 

PETROLEUM CENTER. 

2ooo(S3o)at 07 140 00 

2500 at 07 17500 

8100 at 06 486 00 

9350 at 05 467 50 

200 at 04 S 00 

1000 (S90) 04 40 00 

100 at 03 3 00 

PEERLESS. 

180 at 500 90000 

160 at 5 I2j£ 82000 

30 at 5 25 157 50 

REED CRUDE. 

1500 at 35 525 00 

STERLING. 

50 at 1 30 65 00 

100 at 1 27 J^ 127 50 

300 at 1 25 375 00 

200 at 1 20 240 00 

100 at 1 22'/i... 122 50 

TWENTY-EIGHT 

Hoo at 160 128000 

THIRTY-THREE. 

70 at 8 00 560 00 

WOLVERINE. 

100 at 59 59 00 



Shares 75,758 Amount $22,635 I0 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Crane Co. 

H. T. LALLY, Manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. ) 

24 FREMONT ST. J 



San Francisco, Cal 



AMERICAN, 

STEEL AND WI CM'PV 



Pacific Works 

The only Wire Rope Factory on 
the Pacific Coast. 



We make 

Wire Ropes, Cable and Hawsers 

For all purposes and with 

every possible combination 

of Wires, steel and iron, 

galvanized or plain. 

♦ 
n 
□ 
□ 

5 ° 



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Wire Rope: 
Of all Kinds 
For Oil Well 
Purposes 

r. 
•»p ' a 

•*» . 

And all fixtures and appliances 
for the use of Wire Rope 



Send your orders to 

American Steel&WireCo. 

LOS ANGELES— No. 206 North 

Los Angeles St. 
SAN FRANCISCO— No. 8 & 10 

Pine St. 



□ 
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PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



OUR TURN NEXT. 



Tank Steamers Soon to Visit 
San Francisco. 

Beaumont oil is now being car- 
ried to Europe in tank steamers 
according to the following from 
the Beaumont Enterprise. 

It will not be long before the 
pipe line is completed from Bakers- 
field to the bay and then we in 
our turn can rejoice over tank 
steamers carrying our oil abroad. 

"The big tank steamer Cardium 
arrived in Port Arthur last night 
and is today receiv'ng a cargo of 
Beaumont oil. The incident has 
been frequently spoken of in these 
columns, and it is one of the most 
important events in the history of 
Jefferson county oil developments. 

"Ever since oil w_s first dis- 
covered about one half of the 
prospectors coming into the field 
have been throwing up their 
hands and asking where the mar- 
ket will be found. Another fac- 
tion has been sawing wood and 
saying nothing, with the above 
results. The Cardium is the larg- 
est oil carrying vessel in the world 
and will take on 60,000 barrels. 
The oil goes across the water and 
will be used for fuel in Europe. 
It is being loaded by the J. M. 
Guffey Petroleum company and 
handled by the Shell Trading and 
Transportation company, in whose 
hands the Guffey people have 



placed their European business. 
They will finish loading tomorrow 
and be ready for the sea. Right 
here Is another feature of no small 
importance to the shipper. Had 
the Cardium been loaded with 
cotton, lumber or almost any other 
commodity it would have required 
several days and the service of an 
army of longshoremen to have 
loaded her. 

"As before stated in these col- 
umns, the sulphuric qualities have 
been extracted from the oil that 
goes to Europe and the flash re- 
duced to 150 or about 150 per cent 
from that at the well, which flashes 
at 65. It will not burn under 212 
and the Cardium's cargo is a per- 
fectly safe one to handle." 



LOS ANGBLES COMBINE. 



The Storage Company Ties Up 
Three Hundred Wells. 

A consolidation of Los Angeles 
oil producers has at last been 
perfected, and the new combine, 
if such it may be called, has 
entered the field under the wing 
of the Oil Storage and Transporta- 
tion company. 

Last week it was announced 
that over twenty-four companies, 
representing 300 wells of the local 
field, had accepted the offer of the 
storage company and had signed 
two-year contracts to turn over 
their product. 

Among the signers, says the 



Times, are many producers that at 
one time pledged allegiance to the 
now-defunct Oil Producers' Asso- 
ciation, and in this list is the West- 
lake Oil company, with 4000 bar- 
rels of oil a month; Thomas O'Don- 
nell, 2500 barrels; Daggett & 
Fletcher. 2000 barrels; Johnson & 
Young, 2000 barrels; Pacific Slope, 
4000 barrels, and many other 
smaller producers. One important 
addition to the list is the signature 
of Major H. F. Bulwer, who turns 
over to the company almost 10,000 
barrels a month, which swells the 
total output now contracted with 
the storage company to almost 
35,000 barrels a month. 

The producers met last Thurs- 
day and elected a committee, com- 
mitteee composed of Thos. O'Don- 
nel, W. H. Allen, Jr., and Maj. H. 
F. Bulwer, whose duty will be to 
fix the price to be asked for the 
oil of the combine. Un.ler the 
agreement with the storage com- 
pany this committee will have 
the power to fix prices and close 
contracts. 

This committee will take up the 
matter of fixing a standard price 
this week Friday. In the mean- 
while the ruling price is close to 
60 and 65 cents a barrel, "We 
have nothing to fear from Kern," 
said Edward Strasburg of the 
storage company. "The greatest 
obstacle in the road to advancing 
the price of the home product lies 



in internal competition. Condi-, 
tions in the local market are yet 
very uncertain, and I am not at all 
sure that prices will be advanced 
b) the combine as it now stands. 
If it fully controls the product of 
the field, oil should not sell under 
80 cents." 



Progress at "Tank City." 

"Tank City" as the Standard 
camp is locally known, is expand- 
ing. The Echo says: Its first in- 
stallment of tanks — fifteen — are 
filled to the brim mith oil and now 
the product is being delivered into 
the tanks just recently completed. 
The second installment calls for 
eighteen and workmen are busily 
engaged getting these in trim for 
storing more of the product. The 
work of grading for another batch 
of tanks of the same capacity is 
now in progress and as soon as 
the second installment is com- 
pleted work will be commenced 
on the third. With the comple- 
tion of the third lot of tanks the 
company will have a tankage in 
the river field of nearly two mil- 
lion barrels. 



In California 2000 feet is a great 
depth to drill a well, but Hall & 
Kaul have just finished one in 
their park, seven miles from St. 
Mary's, Elk county, Pa., at a depth 
of 4010 feet. They hoped to strike 
oil or gas in some new sand, but 
the hole proved as dry as a bundle 
of political statistics. 



4 »^.<«^.<*^.w^*^^.<^.'*^. l *^.<^.*<*^.<«^^^ 



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1 



KERR'S REPORTS 

OIL COMPANY DIAGNOSIS 



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WE HAVE 



The only systematized oil rating and reporting agency in the world. 

Field Investigators, ) 

Credit Examiners, IN WESTERN AND SOUTHERN OIL FIELDS., 

Abstract Searchers, 



i 



1 

I 
I 

I 



We have no interest or official connection with 
oil companies. 

" WE ALWAYS KNOW." 

FEES AND CHARGES: A simple, general char- 
acter report, $2.00; details cost more. Our Monthly 
Investment tables with key giving estimates on oil 
companies, West and South, $25.00 for six months, 
under certain conditions free; 3,000 companies listed. 
Send address and claims of the oil company inquired 
for. 

We make credit examinations the same as the 
mercantile agencies. We find the cash values, esti- 
mate land values and oil property and assets. Our 
abstract searchers are the best known and most com- 
petent firms in California and Texas. 

Our field investigators are men who make maps, 
men who drill wells and men hired by this office who 
actually investigate. 



Competent, unbiased, commercial oil reports re- 
quire skill, money and brains. Free oil advice is 
nearly always worthless, or merits suspicion. In- 
vestors must not be lead astray by a few oil jackal 
editors who ambuscade the unwary by giving free 
information in an " Information column," the editor 
getting a "rake off" for his services. 

We give authentic field maps constantly corrected 
and brought down to date by competent field men. 
We sell commercial information on oil progress, pro- 
duction, charters, by-laws, prices, etc., at one-tenth 
of what it would cost you to investigate. We give 
the legal history of a company, if stock is assessable, 
the validity of leases, the amount of royalties, the 
conditions of transportation, prices and competition. 

We tell you how to buy. 

We tell you when to buy. 

We tell you where to buy. 

We tell you when to sell. 

We keep the investor constantly posted on the 
progress of his deal. SEND FOR PROSPECTUS. 



I 

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KERR'S REPORTS 

Mills Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



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OIL 



OIL 









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Deal with responsible people if you want to be protected. 

1 A word to the wise is sufficient." 

Success camps with success. 

" Then follow success." 

Follow me ! ! ! 

With 14 producing companies I've broken the record — 7 to 1. 

Where would you have been, had you followed me? 

The secret of my success lies in the fact that I place my clients on proven property. 

I let others " wild-cat" and " prospect." 

I'll be their neighbor IF they strike oil. 

Write for a FREE copy of my "Illustrated Oil Fields," which describes the origin 

of oil in all its phases, where it is found, etc., etc. 
References: San Francisco Banks. 

Authentic information furnished regarding any oil company in the State of California. 
I have trustworthy data always available. 
Correspondence welcomed. 

JAMES R. T. MBRSHON 



S3 

1 
% 
1 



MEMBER SAN FRANCISCO OIL EXCHANGE 



Rooms 537-8-9 



PARROTT BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



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OIL 



OIL 



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14 



PACIFIC Oil, REPORTER 



OIL DIRECTORY 



Leading Companies Now Operat- 
ing in California. 



/"^AUSTOGA OIL, AND DEVELOPMENT CO. 

500,000 shares par value $1. 
Operating on 2320 acres located lu Napa, Yolo, 
Fresno, San Benito, Monterey and Kern counties. 
Officers: L D Hitchcock, president; R B Todd, 
vice-president and manager; B F Edwards, 
secretary; J M Caseltnan, treasurer; Dr. H G 
Thomas and Dr. E J Boyes. San Francisco 
National Bank, depository. Office, 23 and 24 
Merchants Exchange, San Francisco, Cal. 



i"1YGNET PETROLEUM CO. 

Capital $150,000 

50,000 shares at $3. 

Location — Fresno county. 

Directors— Chas. L Fair, president, Blitz W Pax- 
ton, vice-president, Chas. A. Lee, treasurer, John 
C. McElroy, secretary. 

Office— 561 Parrott Building. 

Tel.— South 184. 

/^lUYAMA VALLEY OIL COMPANY. 

Capital $1,000,000 

1,000,000 shares at $1.00. 

Location, 80 acres in 4, 9-25 in Santa Barbara 
County and 80 acres in 15, 10-24 in Kern County. 
Incorporated under the laws of South Dakota. 

Directors— W. H . Turner President ; Robt. 
Johnson, Secretary and Treasurer; Andrew 
Christensen, Frederick Misch, L. M. Hickox; 
Depository, Western National Bank. 

Paeific States Mining & Investment Company, 
fiscal agents. 

Office— 326 Post Street, San Fjancisco. 



CUPERIOR OIL COMPANY. 

Capital stock, 500,000 shares, par value $1 each 

5960 acres of I *nd in the Sunset and McKittrick 
district. 

Two Standard rigs operating at present time. 

Officers and Directors— R S Aston, president; 
W Dixon, vice-president; J W Crosland, secretary 
and treasurer, Wm, M Landess, W W Kelly and 
W" G Wallace. Attorney, C C Cowgill. Office, No. 
17 Galtes block. Bakersfield . Cal 



U. 



S. OIL AND MINING CO. 



Capital $300,000 

Par value, $1 per share. 

Location: 320 acres in Kern River District, 160 
acres in section 27, 11-24 Sunset district, near Blod- 
gett & Jewett wells, 110 acres on fraction 26, 12-24, 
near Monarch, adjoining Jewett, Blodgett &Beal 
gusher. L- M. Underwood, president, F Ketelhut 
seel 'tary. 

Office— 211 19th street, Bskersfield.lCal, 



* - -• — 1 



Oil Prospectuses 

Uooklets, Stock Certificates, Letterheads, Knvelopes, Dodgers, 
Letter Circulars, etc., 



1 
I 

i 



Printed at short notice and at reasonable prices. '£ 

I Pacific Oil Reporter Job Office f 

Rooms 31, 32 and 33 $ 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



WALDORF OIL AND ASPHALT COMPANY. 
Incorporated Feb 25, igoi. Capital, $500,000 
500,000 shares at $1.00 per share. Place of busi- 
ness, Hanford, Cal. Headquajters at McCord & 
Son. Location of lauds, 1,2, o, Guadalupe, Santa 
Barbara county, Cal. Officers and directors: Geo 
B McCord, president, Hanford; Dr N P Duncan, 
vice-president, Hanford; T O Hickman, treas- 
urer, Hanford; Wm M Madden, attorney for com- 
pany. San Francisco; W H Worswick. field super- 
intendent. Hanford: F Brader. Hanford, N Weis- 
baum, Hanford. LS Chittenden, Hanford, W H 
Worswick. Jr, Hanford. Jas Manasse, secretary. 



D 



ABNEY OIL COMPANY. 



Incorporated. 
McKittrick district. 16 completed wells; no 
acres -proven ground. 
Office, 330 Pine St., Room 5, Sau Francisco, Cal, 



G 



REAT NORTHERN OIL CO. OF OAKLAND 
.$250,000 



Capital 

250,000 shares at $1 

125,000 shares of treasury stock, 

Location of property, Glenn County, Calif., 2,200 

acres, near Elk Creek, in Stoney Creek Mineral 

district. 

Officers, B F Arnold, President, Geo A Gray 
Secretary. 
Office, 476 Teuth street, Oakland, 



jyrONTEREY OIL DEVELOPMENT CO. 

Capital .'$1 ,000,000 

1,000,000 shares at $1 each. 

Location of lands: Coalinga oil fields, Fresno 
county, 160 acres; Panoche oil fields, San Benito 
county, 160 acres; Monterey county oil belt, 4280 
acres. 

Officers: Dr J L Roberts, president; J B S Malt- 
ly, vice-president; J F Moore, secretary; D J 
Boughton. treasurer; Bank of Monterej, deposi- 
tory. ■ Office at Monterey City, Cal. 



OCCID ENTAL OIL CO. 
OF WEST VIRGINIA. 

Capital stock 600,000 shares par value, $1.00. 

Officers: Wm. Crites, president: F. M Graham, 
vice-president; J. B. Batz, treasurer; C. E. Hail- 
tone, secretary; T. L, Moran, manager; Kein 
alley Bank, Cal. Depository. 
M. R. Goldberg, 483 Ninth street Oakland. Cal 



OBISPO OIL COMPANY. Capital, $1,000,000. 
Number of shares, 1,000,000. Treasury 
stock, -550,000 shares. All stock fully paid and 
non-assessable. Incorporated under the laws of 
California. Properties in Kern, Fresno, San 
Benito and San Luis Obispo counties, Cal. In- 
corporators: G R Parkinson, President Bank of 
Palo Alto; Captain Frank Barrett, Palo Alto, Cal.; 
K W Brown, Fresno, Cal.; Chas E Bond, Minne- 
apolis, Minn, ; C F Alderson. Chicago, 111. Offi- 
cers: John F Giles, president; Frank Barrett, 
vice president; Chas E Bond, treasurer; C F 
Aldeison, secretary, K W Brown, assistant secre- 
tary. Office, Suite 74. Citizens Bank building, 
119-121 La Salle street, Chicago, 111. 



OCCIDENTAL OIL COMPANY 
OF WEST VIRGLNIA. 

Capital stock, 600,000 shares par value, $1.00 

Officers— Wm. Crites, president; F M. Graham, 
vice-president; J. B. Batz, treasurer, C. E. Hail- 
stone, secretary; T. L- Moran, manager; Kern 
Valley Bank, Cal., depository. 

Mostellar & Allen, San Francisco Agents, 346 
Parrott Bldg. Telephone. Jessie 1683. 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY. Cap'tal stock, 
12.850,000; Par value, $1.00. Has 2,000 acres 
in Kern, Los Angeles and Summerland fields, 
with 27 producing wells. Officers and directors; 
P V Schermerhorn, president; C H Ritchie, vice- 
president; R D Robinson, secretary and treas- 
urer; D M Schermerhorn and W S Morton. Priu 
cipal office, Potomac building, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Tel. John 2281. 

SALINAS OIL AND DEVELOPMENT COM- 
PANY. Capital, $1,000,000. i, 000.000 shares 
at $1.00. Land in Monterey county. Officers and 
directors: President, W N McCarthy. San Fran- 
cisco; vice-president, J J Gunn, Independence; 
treasurer, Wm N McCarthy; secretary. J B Olsen, 
San Francisco; superintendent, Jno C Quinn; C A 
Burchom, J E Baker, N A Dorn, W J Ellis and S 
S Simon, attorney, Hon Eugene F Bert, San Fran 
Cisco Office, room 573-574 Parrott building, San 
Francisco. 



S 



URETY OIL COMPANY 



Capital $600,000 

600,000 shares par value $1.00 each. 

Location, 240 acres in section 20 and 29 T 3 N R 
16 W, S B M, Los Angeles County, Calif., Newhall 
district 

Officers and, Directors, M Esternaux. President, 
Geo. Greely King, Vice-President, T. H. Pearne, 
Secretary. D. A. Thieme, M. C. White. 

Farmers and Merchants Banks, depository. 

Office, 102 Henne Block. Los Angeles. Calif. 



S' 



TANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 



Capital $300,000 

Treasury stock $150,000 

Location: 92 acres leased proven oil land in 
McKittrick; 80 acres owned in Coalinga near 
Home Oil company, Fresno; 160 acres owned ad- 
joining oil well in Napa valley. 

Officers: R A Falkeuberg, president; R L Bis- 
by, vice-president; M J Henry, secretary; J G 
Steele, treasurer; F Cooke-Caldwell, attorney for 
company. 

Offices: 475-76 Parrott Building, 853 Market 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS 



Mexico 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

SPECIAL TRAIN 
EXCURSION 

PERSONALLY CONDUCTED 

COMPOSITE CAR, DINING CAR 

VESTIBULED SLEEPERS 



RATE 



LEAVES 



$80 SAN FRANCISCO Dec. 18 
$70 LOS ANGELES Dec. 19 



Good sixty days. Optional side trips. 

Special rates from all California 

Points. 

Inquire of Agent for Literature- 



ARIZONA INCORPORATIONS 



We make a specialty of chartering Ari- 
zona Corporations. Arizona has the 
most liberal laws in the United States- 
no taxes to pay, stock tnade non-assess- 
able, no personal liability for corporate 
debts. 

We take stock for cur service, if you de- 
sire. We save you one-half the fees 
charged by others, and help you pro- 
mote your enterprise. We give you a 
certi6cate that you are duly incorpor- 
ated. All business attended to by an 
expert corporation lawyer. Correspond- 
ence solicited. 



THE WESTERN INVESTMENT CO 

Rooms 1 and 3, Porter Block 
PHOENIX - - ARIZONA 



Fop Lease 

Twenty acres of absolutely proven oil 
land in McKittrick district to lease on 
royalty basis for development work. 
Chance for good, responsible driller. 
Securities required. 

For further particulars, address, 

W. G. KERCKHOFF 

Wilcox Block, Los Angeles. 



4 fc'«^'fe*'fe#!'fe#> fe*''Si*'fe*''«T»! , fe* ^^ 



The Barrett Oil' Well Swivel Wreflch £S;i'S 



1 boxes 




Djilllers, to be successful, should use the best aDd latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND "MONEY SAVED. 
It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits. 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. 



-MANUFACTUKED BY- 



J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



"I 

Steel Water Pipe 
& General Sheet 
Iron Works 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Oil Well Casing Oil Stills 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets. P. O. Box 231 

Telephone, Main 196. Baker Block. Station C 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 





Webster Iron Works 



DEPARTMENTS: 



MACHINE SHOPS 
BLACKSMITH SHOP 



m 






FOUNDRY 



PATTERN SHOP g& 

w 

1 



MINING, MILLING and MACHINE CASTINGS 



i 

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7(VJ/i 



Rig Irons, Sand Reels, Sand Pumps, Drilling and Fishing ^ 
Tools, Hea^y Forgings. 



Telephone 341 



21st and I Streets. 

BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 



PO.Box 463 



m 
§ 



mwrnmimmm tHBaHaraHBHroau 




For prices, etc., inquire 



W. FORGIE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil& Gas Well Rig Irons 
Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San 
Francisco, Cal,, Bakersfield, Cal. 



PACFIC OIL REPORTER. 



«*SSW5SW5WS«*M*»»S*S» 



»»*««*«« 



Stock Guaranteed 

BY 

Gold Bond 

Bearing 3 per cent interest per 
annum, payable semi-annually. 

Deposited as Security 

for full amount of pan 
price. 



Limited amount of 
ASSESSABLE stuck 
offered at ft.oo )>er share. 



AMERICAN TOOL WORKS a. s. cooper, c e, i. e 



Hollister 

Crude Oil Co., Ltd., 

308 Market Street 

San Francisco 

Responsible Brokers Wanted. 




Smith=Premier £ 
Typewriters $ 

Are Used Everywhere 

READ THIS LIST: 
Heald's Business College use. 30 
Southern Pacibc Co. system ..47 

Western Union Tel. Co 36 

S. F. Public Schools now use. . .43 

S. F.Call " ..•■« 

Hale Bros ...... " '4 

Viavi Co " • • ■ J 2 

Cogswell College ' II 

Miller, Scott & Sloss . " .... 10 



JOSEPH EASTWOOD. Proprietor. 

MAN! IACTIKKKS OF 

Standard and Special Drilling Tools 



219 Crocker Building 

\N FRANCISCO 



'.1.TIKS 



All Sizes of Casing Spears Tor Rent. 

109=111 Mission Street, 

Bet. Spear and Main 

Telephone, Main 5578. 



Petroleum Oil, Asphaltum and 
kindred hydrocarbons 



Patent 
Redwood 



OIL TANKS 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

41b, 418. 4,20, 422, 424, 426 

Sansorae St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to tie trade. 



We carry the Largest stock. Out pticen «rr 
Rq tillable. 

Tel. Main. 1133. 



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P3 




42 feet diameter. 18 feet high. Capacity, 177,500 gallons. 



When you want to swear go to 

LEE D. CRAIG 

Notary Public and 
Commissioner of Deeds 



316 Montgomery St. 

bet. Califorcia 

and Pine, San Francisco. 



Atlas Pipe Wrench<C 

Received highest award at Pan-American Kxposition, Buffalj, N. Y., igoi. 



IT HAS 
NO EQUAL 




NO THREADS 
TO STRIP 



Made in four sizes — 10, iS, 24 and 36 inches. 

Atlas Tube Cleaner 

Received highest award at Pan- American -Exposition, Buffalo, N. Y., 1901, 



For Water=tube 
Boilers 




It Has No 
Equal . 



The Road to Wealth 

Headquarters School and Gorernmeo 
Lands. 

Lands all counties in California. No conditions 
on School Lands as to residence or cultivation 
Only $1.25 an acre. Locaticii* in all Mineral Belt. 
—Kern River, McKittrick, Devil's Den, Mojave, 
Sunset, Ooalinga and other famous districts. The 
Cheapest, Safest and Surest Investment in Araer- 
ca. Send Stamp for Land Book. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, California. 

400,000 Shares of Oil Stock 



Get information from us about 
the new SPEED Device. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

no Montgomery St., S. F. 

yy^WyWWV^rAr>r>rW^rWV 



□□nnnDDODnannnnnauanannDno 

n Before buying Oil Stock or g 
a leasing or buying Oil Lands n 
g call on A. BARIEAU, Room Q 
n 23 Columbian Building, 916 g 
q Market Street, San Francisco □ 
QnnnannonnDrjDrjnannrjnrjQannn 



Write for circulars. Ask your supply man. 
Manufactured by 

ATLAS PIPE WRENCH CO. Fl00d K^ cisc( , 

New York Office, 121 Liberty Street Works, New Haven, Conn. 



Dividend No. 1 

HUB been authorized to be declared November 
15th, payable to the stockholders of the Ventura 
Consolidated Crude Oil Company. 

This company has made surprising progress in 
the past four months. It now has three produc- 
ing wells and work progressing on No. 4. With 
2720 acres of oil land and a rich gold mine in 
Arizona there can be no doubt of the present 
investment value of this stock. Limited amount 
of treasury stock now offered at 15 cents per 
share, par value, $1.00.— Full paid— Non-assessa- 
ble. Agents wanted in every town. Address all 
orders for stock or further particulars to 

W. G. YOUNG & CO., 

Fiscal Agents. 
628-30 Laughlin Bldg., Los Angeles.Cwl. 



The Star Drilling Machine 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of uiachin 
oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 
ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. 




Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 



The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a liurt of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 
recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying spriugs. They are simple, 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in even,- State and Territory 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON OHIO. 



AUSTIN'S PORTABLE DRILLING RIGS 

Made in sizes to suit territory. Simple, powerful, efficient. 

Crude Oil Fuel Burning Plants for Boilers, Furnaces and Ovens. Boilers, 

Engines, Oil Storage and Wagon Tanks, Refining Equipment, 

.Oil, Gas and Artesian Well Supplies of every description, 

Drilling and Fishing Tools 

Standard Wroughl Iron Pipe, Cast Iron and Mal- 
leable Iron Fittings. 

BRASS AND IRON VALVES 

Oil Well Casing, Tubing, Drive and I^ine Pipe, 

Catalogues, Estimates and Specifications 

furnished on application. 




Austin's Latest Improved Combination Drilling Machine. This machine will drill in ordinary formations at five times the speed of a Standard rig 



GEORGE H. TAY COMPANY 

49 to 53 First Street, San Francisco 

WW^rWW WW W W V WW^W^VW^^WWWSW^JW^WW V^^^V^^^VV ??¥▼?? WWWW^WWW^WWW^rWW W W V WWW WWW^^WW WWWWW* W WWW* VrW^PW W ▼▼ W WWVW* 

Not Quantity of Land but Quality 

SILVER STAR OIL COMPANY 



Capital Stock 300,000 Shares 



Par Value $1.00 per Share 



THE IyAND OF THIS COMPANY comprises the SE quarter of the NW quarter of Section 28, Township 30 S., Range 22 E- This property is directlyin line of pro- 
duction and within one-quarter of a mile of the famous Dabney wells, and land that cannot be purchased for less than $20,000 per acre, and only 1 mile from the S. P. 
R. R. station at McKittncfc. Immense deposits of asphaltum are found on this land, as well as numerous seepages of oil and live oil sand on the surface. There can 
scarcely be a doubt as to the enormous value of this land, but the drill alone will tell. 
WORK HAS COMMENCED. Well No. 1 is now almost completed and is in oil. 
FOR A SHORT TIME ONLY a limited quantity of stock in this company is offered at 25 CENTS PER SHARE. Write for Prospectus to the 

Silver Star Oil Co., 607=608 Safe Deposit Building, San Francisco 

PLEASE MENTION THE PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PARKE & LACY CO. 

San Francisco, CaL Bakersfield, Cal. 

21 and 28 Fremont Street, San Francisco 

OIL WELL HACHINERY 

TOOLS AND SUPPLIES 

Complete Standard Drilling Outfits in Stock. Boston Casing Drive Pipe and Tubing, Boilers, Engines and Complete Pumping Plants. 

AGENTS FOR 

Bovaird & Seyfang Engines and Tools; Columbian Eastern Drilling Cables, "The Best"; Star Portable Drilling Machines; Knowles 

Steam Pumps; Forgie Jacks. 

CALL ON US FOR PRICES AND SPECIFICATIONS 



Endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 



»5SS«3SS«$$S«SSS$$SSS««SS«S«S$«SaK 



'"''' K»*5SS««S**S«SS*SSS$SS«SS«3$^^ 



We ofier you 



The third edition of our little 
booklet has been received. You 
should write for one. 



Don't You Think 

a good opportunity for investment ? Thousands 
have read our little booklet during the past 30 days 
and hundreds are placing their surplus cash with us 
because they have investigated and know we are 
safe, strong and progressive. They want to buy our 
stock at bedrock prices. DO YOU ? 



ADDRESS 



WSSSS«4«5S««»S«5«WS$«^^ 



Standard Consolidated 
Oil and Land Company 

ROOM 7, 532 MARKET STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MEMBERS CALIFORNIA PETROLEUM MINERS' ASSOCIATION 



J , i^ , fe*'l^fe**fe*'4^^^»;'fe»s'fc»s'fe*^ 



1 
1. 



$100 BUYS 

200 SHARES 
OIL STOCKS 

In Ai Oil Company; 200 barrel well. Stock sold in lots 
of $100 and up. Guaranteed against loss by 

Security Gold Bond 

Indorsed by a Trust Company of $1,000,000 paid up capi- 
tal. Cash returned at maturity of bond. Safe, legitimate. 
Investigate. Stock shares in all dividends and profits. 
Handsome illustrated booklets of oil fields, with official 
map, for 10 cents in stamps. 

ILLINOIS OIL BOND COMPANY 

Room 506, 167 Dearborn Street, Chicogo. 

Home Office, Room 7, first floor, Mills Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



I 



$ 



THE BEST CASING PULLER 

The Norton Ratchet Jack 

With Ring and Slips for Pulling 
Casing. 



ALWAYS SAFE, READY AND EFFECTIVE 



This jack is self lubricating, pro- 
vided with ball bearings, giving 
maximum of efficiency with mini- 
mum of friction. No blocking re- 
quired, as the hold of the ting and 
slips is absolute. Convenient to 
operate, light and durable. For 
prices and particulars address 

M. G. WEST, 216 California Street, San Francisco. 




Bovaird & Seyfang Mf'g Co. 



■ MANUFACTURERS OF • 



Stationary and Portable Boilers, Steam Engines, 

Iron Tanks, Rig Iron Outfits, Drilling and Fish ng Tools, 

And everything needed to drill and operate 



Oil, Gas and Artesian Wells 

Manufacturers' Agents for Tubing, Casing, Pipe Fittings, Valves, Etc. 

Natural Gas Plants a Specialty. 

Cable address, "Boang." A B C and Private Codes. 

BRADFORD, PA., U.S. A. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 






NOVEMBER », iqoi. 



Prick, Tkn Cents 



OPERATIONS IN UTAH. 

A New Oil Field That Promises Great Finan- 
cial Returns to Those Who Develop Its 
Vast Deposits of Petroleum. 



The California I'tah Oil Com- 
pany has commenced active opera- 
tions toward the development of 
the Emery County oil fields. The 
company has selected the ground 
upon which it will sink its first 
well, and already the plant is be- 
ing set up, The site is located 
nine miles south of Green River 
Station, on the Rio Grande West- 
ern road, on the west side of the 
liver, in Emery County, and on 
what is known as the Blue Ridge. 
The plant was sidetracked at Og- 
den nearly two weeks ago till the 
company's expert selected the site 
for the well. As soon as he re- 
ported the plant was ordered to 
Green River. The California- 
Utata Company's rig is the first of 
the Standard type to be set up in 
the Utah oil fields, and has a ca- 
pacity to drill as deep as 4,500 
feet. The company is composed 
of some of the leading oil men of 
California, whose faith in the 
Emery county oil fields is bound- 
less The capitalization is 24,000 
shares, at a par value of $1 each, 
but not a share is for sale. The 
raec behind the enterprise are 
putting up their own money to 
exploit the field, own a large acre- 
age and appear to mean business. 

Four expert California oil drillers 
have contracted to sink the well 
for about $2 a foot, the company 
supplying all the materials. The 
contract calls for 1300 feet or less, 
and Manager Roberts says a water 
well will not be accepted. The 
hole must be dry or contain oil. 
It was necessary to send to the 
coast for the lumber as well as 
the machinery, because no dealer 
in Utah carried lumber needed for 
the Sampson post and walking 
beam which operates the two ton 
tool used to sink the well. Two 
sticks twenty-six inches square 
were sent for. 

The officers and directors of the 
California-Utah Oil Company are 
C. M. Kilbourn, president; W. I. 
Roberts, of Price, Utah, secretary 
and treasurer; D. C. Robbins, 
Provo, Utah, manager; W. G. and 
Walter Scott, Selma, Cala., and W. 
J. Berry, also of Selma. 

As far back as 1888 it has been 
known that oil existed in vast 
quantities in this portion of Utah- 
Several streets in Vernal City, 
Utah, are paved with the oil sand 
that is found near the surface, and 
which when mixed with other 
substances forms a pavement as 
hard as asphalt. 

In several portions of this region 



it is impossible to dig a well and 
obtain water that is not so im- 
pregnated with oil as to be useless 
for either man or beast. 

At one time some hunters 
camped under a ledge several 
hundred feet high, set fire to the 
ledge from their camp fire, and 
soon the entire lace of the ledge, 
being filled with oil, was blazing 
and giving forth a most intense 
heat. 

Last June a party of California 
oil men visited this region to give 
it a personal examination. The 
party consisted of W. G. Scott and 
W. J. Berry, of Selma, C. M. 
Kilbourn, Milton McWhorter, W. 
I. Roberts and D. C. Rob- 
bins. They stayed two weeks, 
and returned confident that oil of 
a fine grade, suitable for refining 
could be obtained there. A vast 
tract of land was secured by 
mineral location and by purchase. 

The oil is of 34 degrees gravity, 
and has a paraffine base. Samples 
were secured from a shallow well 
which at all times centains oil and 
is said to be good for from three to 
five barrels a day. 

In the vicinity are coal mines. 
About one-third of the land owned 
by the California-Utah Oil Com- 
pany is in Carbon county, near 
Mound Station, on Price river, and 
on either side of the Rio Grande 
Western Railroad. The remain- 
ing territory is located in the 
vicinity of Green River and Wood- 
side Stations of the Rio Grande 
Western Railroadin Emery county, 
near the Price and Green rivers, 
beginning about 150 miles south- 
east of Salt Lake City. 

This land is all located in the 
Great Basin of the Price Valley 
and in age belongs to the cre- 
taceous period. The whole valley 
is made by the erosion of wind and 
water and removal of the tertiary 
and superficial deposits down to 
the cretaceous, leaving a valley 
some thirty miles wide by 70 or 80 
miles long. 

The surface consists of low 
plateaus and deeper valley, the 
result of river and creek erosions 
since the formation of the valley 
proper. Traversing this great 
valley from southeast to north- 
west, are two anticlinal uplifts 
running nearly its entire distance 
from Mount Station to Green 
River, and along this anticlinal 
uplift, the California-Utah Oil 
Company has selected its holdings, 
believing as elsewhere the main 
deposits of petroleum will be 



found in the anticlinal uplifts. 
The general features of the sur- 
face are such as one might expect 
to find in any valley where the 
<>n of the superincumbent ter- 
tiary has taken place, exposing 
the upper cretaceous. There are 
left vast areas of the surface where 
the very lower members of the 
tertiary are left in thin sheets or 
caps to plateaus from 200 to 300 
feet high while the surrounding 
valleys, washes, creek bottoms and 
river valleys lie wholly in the 
upper cretaceous. 

The upper layers, belonging 
without doubt to the tertiary, con- 
sist of layers of shale, sandstone 
and conglomerates disposed in 
nearly a horizontal position, but 
having a slight fall towards the 
southeast. The erosions expose 
the blue shales of the cretaceous 
at all points where sufficient ero- 
sion has occurred to remove the 
tertiary formation. 

At those points where the anti- 
clinals have been cut into by the 
streams, such as the crossing of 
the Green River and the Grand 
River, there are bold seepages of 
oil. In some places astonishing 
amounts of oil are escaping. In 
many places within the valley 
there are fine indications of oil, 
and in a few places actual seep- 
ages are met with. While it is 
not contended that the entire 
valley is underlaid with oil beds 
there is every reason to believe 
that along the anticlinal uplifts 
there will be fine deposits of oil 
found. The California- Utah Oil 
Company, has selected its lands 
with reference to these anticlines, 
locating them with the utmost 
care along the most favored domes 
of these anticlines. 

The formation being cretaceous 
the oil found here will be illu- 
minating, and will belong to the 
paraffine family. The oil found 
Seeping from these anticlines is 
plainly paraffine oil, and therefore 
much more valuable than the oil 
obtained in the tertiary formation 
of California and Texas. It is 
found to be practically free from 
those peculiar sulphur compounds 
which render all asphaltic oils re- 
bellious and difficult to refine. 
The gravity of the seepage oil is 
such that the incorporators con- 
fidently expect to obtain at a 
reasonable depth, oil of a very 
light specific gravity and finely 
adopted to the refiner's use. 

These lands being located near 
the Rio Grande Western Railroad, 
is rendered doubly valuable. In 
the matter of the prices obtained 
by the producer for crude oils, the 
well informed know that trans- 
portation is one of the most im- 
portant factors. Where oil is pio- 
duced from lands that are distant 
from railroads or other shipping 
facilities, the oil is practically 
valueless, simply because the cost 



of transportation equals the piice 
I of crude oil. These lands tbere- 
: fore, being located in close prox- 
imity to the railroad are, other 
things being equal, the most valu- 
i able oil fields yet discovered in 
Utah. 

Another feature of interest to 
the oil operator, is, that the Price 
River Valley affords abundant 
supply of water for all mechanical 
purposes, thus making it possible 
to prospect the land at compara- 
tively slight cost as compared with 
other fields in the state. 

Other oil companies beside the 
California-Utah will soon be oper- 
ating in this region, Walker 
brothers being one of several com- 
panies and close corporations that 
have ordered their rigs and that 
will soon be drilling. 

As the oil is of very superior 
quality and commands a high 
price on account of its illumin- 
ating and lubricating qualities a 
ready market is assured for the oil 
in Colorado and the adajcent 
States, where the transportation 
rates from the Atlantic and Pacific 
Coast refineries will make it pos- 
sible to sell the Utah product at a 
profit and still at a price below 
that of the coast product. 

While it is to be regretted tha 
California capital should be taken 
from this coast to operate in Utah, 
still the surety of a large return 
for the investment warrants the 
expenditure of large sums in ex- 
ploiting this new territory. 



OIL IN COLUSA. 



A Good Strike Made at the Ori> & 
Meracle Well. 

The Orr & Meracle oil well on 
the Harlan place has probably 
struck oil. At about 4 o'clock last 
Friday morning the drill was peg- 
ging away at the bottom of the 
hole when all of a sudden the 
crew was startled by a rumbling 
noise, and a great quantity of gas 
shot upward. The pressure was 
so great in the hole that it was 
impossible to force the sand pump 
down, so they resorted to the usual 
method, of burning it out. Alight 
was lowered inside of a sand 
pump and when it had gotten 
down only about one hundred feet 
the explosion blew the whole 
thing out of the well, and the 
flames shot upward nearly fifty 
feet above the mouth of the well. 

The drill had been working for 
hours in hard sandstone and when 
it was penetrated the gas and a 
heavy flow of water, which raised 
about four hundred and fifty feet 
in the hole, was encountered, 
together with considerable oil, 
which, it is thought, is in sufficient 
quantities to pay to pump. The 
drill was started again. A larger 
sand pump has been ordered and 
the water will be pumped out. 

The promoters are quite con- 
fident that they will soon have a 
good paying hole. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



THE COLORADO DESERT. 



Outlook for Oil Development in this Region. 

Many Companies Now Operating Here 

with Good Chances of Success. 



Stephen Bowers, field assistant 
under State Mineralogist Louis E. 
Aubury, has submitted his report 
of a reconnaissance recently made 
by him of the Colorado Desert 
mining district in San Diego 
county, Cal. 

This district extends from the 
boundary line between the United 
States and Mexico on the south, 
to the Riverside county line on 
the north, and skirts the mountains 
at their eastern extremity which 
in early Tertiary times were 
islands in the ocean, or made a 
deeply indented seashore across 
what is now San Diego county. 
The district extends from the 
mountains eastwardly somewhat 
indefinitely. The desert proper 
slopes from an altitude of about 
400 feet toward the Colorado river 
and Gulf of California, and in 
some places is below sea level. 
Much erosion has taken place, and 
the desert is largely covered with 
washes, sand dunes, scarps, etc., 
which make travel more or less 
difficult. The mountains on the 
western side of this vast plain 
are destitute of vegetation, but 
mesquite trees, greasewood, and 
some other shrubs grow along the 
washes in the desert. 

For convenience the territory 
which has been located for petro- 
leum has been divided into four 
districts: 1. Coyote Wells; 2.Carrizo 
Creek; 3. Fish Creek, and 4. Seven- 
teen Palms Sprirjgs. 

There are many indications of 
the presence of petroleum in the 
Coyote Wells district, exposures 
of sandstone shale occuring nearly 
all over the district, accompanied 
by much concretionary sandstone, 
gypsum, petrified shells, wood, etc. 
Nearly all of the foothills are highly 
fossiliferous, the small oyster shell 
predominating. About 3j4 miles 
north of Coyote Wells is a con- 
spicuous elevation rising 150 feet 
above the plain, and composed 
almost entirely of smalt fossil 
oyster-shells solidly cemented to- 
gether. 

The Yuha Oil company is arrang- 
ing to send drilling machinery in- 
to this district. Their first test 
well will be located on the SW J^ 
of Sec. 33, T. 16 S., R. 1 j E. 

Carrizo Creek has its rise in the 
Jacumba Valley, about 15 miles 
southwest of Coyote Wells. While 
the larger portion of this valley 
lies in Mexico, yet the outlet is to 
the north through American terri 
tory. The creek runs northwest- 
wardly for about 18 miles to Sec. 
10, T. 15 S., R. 8 E., where it is 
joined by San Felipe Creek, and 
finally reaches Salton Lake. 

These creeks are dry except in 



the rainy season, at which time 
they drain a large district of 
country. All of the territory near 
the bed of Carrizo Creek from the 
foot of the mounta.in to Salton 
Lake has been located for petro- 
leum; also, the territory along the 
bed of Vallecitos Creek, below 
Vallecitos Springs, 

The district is bounded on the 
north by Black Mountain, on the 
west and northwest by Vallecitos 
and Laguna Mountains, and on 
the south by Cariizo Mountain. 
Superstition Mountain is included 
in its eastern extension. The 
valley of Palm Springs, including 
the "clay hills," is about eight 
miles wide; at Carrizo Springs 
about ten miles wide; and about 
five miles at Cactus Oil company's 
well. These eroded sand hills 
expose much stratified sandstone, 
some of which are capped with 
hard fossiliferous rock. 

In an intersecting wash coming 
into Vallecitos Creek from the 
southwest, about five miles below 
Palm Springs, is located Palm 
Springs Oil Well No. 1; B. L. 
Bailey, superintendent. There is 
a valley here about i)/ 2 miles wide, 
with granite mountains on the 
western side and a range of sand- 
stone and clay hills 60 feet to 70 
feet high on the eastern side. The 
well is being drilled close to the 
hills three-fourths or a mile from 
Vallecitos Creek, at an elevation 
of about 800 feet. There are piles 
of bowlders of quartzite, granite, 
lava, etc., along the hills near the 
well. The hills present a steep 
scarp on the western side, and ex- 
tend a considerable distance east- 
wardly. 

Mr. Bailey has contracted to 
drill the well to a depth of 1000 
feet, and had reached 170 feet, 
July 1st. He reports having 
passed through the following for- 
mations: Sand and thin layers of 
clay and bowlders, 108 feet; con- 
glomerate, g feet; clay, 3 feet; 
bowlders, 3 feet; clay, 3 feet; 
bowlders, 2 feet; conglomerate, 10 
feet; large bowlders, 6 feet; tough 
red clay, 5 feet; conglomerate, 8 
feet; large bowlders, 12 feet. Mr. 
Bailey is using a gasoline engine 
and drilling machinery such as is 
ordinarily employed in drilling for 
water. 

In a canyon two miles west of 
the Palm Springs Company's well 
are Mountain Palm Springs, which 
supply water for the company. 
There is a large amount ofgtod 
water here, and much mere can 
easily be developed. The water 
rises in several places along the 
c anyon for a half mile or more 
At the upper springs is a grove of 



nearly seventy palms, which re 
main as a memorial of the past 
when the palm was plentiful along 
the foothills and over the now 
arid desert. 

Thirteen miles below the Palm 
Springs company's well, and a 
half mile south of Carrizo Creek, 
the Cactus Oil company has located 
a well. Captain Frank Barrett is 
superintendent. In July the well 
was down 175 feet. The company 
is using the Star No. 7 drilling 
machine. This is a portable 
machine with spudding and pipe 
driving attachment, 1 5 horse-power 
engine, with T boiler on separate 
trucks; derrick pole, 53 feet high. 
It is capable of drilling to a depth 
of 2500 feet. Mesquite wood is 
used lor fuel. The well is located 
in a small valley surrounded by 
hills of clay and silt, in which 
much selenite gypsum occurs. The 
elevation is 400 feet above sea 
level. A few hundred yards fouth 
are beds of large fossil oyster 
shells, which extend for a distance 
of nearly two miles. There are 
also sandstone concretions, and in 
one place a clearly developed cen- 
trocline. There is some meta- 
morphism in this neighborhood, 
but probably not enough to affect) 
oil prospects unfavorably. 

The Cactus Oil company's well 
was down 175 feet July 10th. 
After passing through a super- 
ficial deposit of 3 feet, a grayish 
sandstone was encountered for 50 
feet, when blue shale was struck 
and continued for 100 feet. At 
160 feet porous sandstone was 
struck, and brackish water which 
arose in the pipe about 100 feet. 
This became less saline in going 
downward. 

There are two wells, about four- 
teen miles apart, being drilled in 
Fish Creek district. Hanna & 
Co.'s well is near the mountains, 
at an elevation of about 675 feet. 
It is in Sec. 24, T. 13 S., R. 8 E. 
The Mesquite Oil company's well 
is located near Fish Creek, at 
about sea level, in section 26, T. 
12 S., R. 7 E. 

Hanna & Co.'s oil well is being 
drilled a half mile west of the 
mouth of Roark Canyon. The 
proprietors are Hanna, Roark & 
Blethen. The locality is sur- 
rounded by much conglomerate 
rock and some sandstone, but no 
fossils occur here. The well is 
down 190 feet, and has passed 
through various grades and colors, 
one thin stratum of conglomerate, 
and seme blue clay. The work 
has been done with a 6-inch water 
well drilling machine driven by a 
a gasoline engine. The gasoline 
is hauled from Fosters, a distance 
of nearly 100 miles. This is an 
experimental well, and owingtothe 
rock formation, casing has not been 
used thus far. 

The Mesquite Oil company's 
wells are located on Fish Creek. 
A boiling spring rises in the bed 
of the creek about 250 yards south 
of well No. 2, accompanied with 
considerable gas, which is said to 



be carburetted hydrogen gas. The 
stream of water is perennial, and 
Is used for b6th domestic and 
steam purposes. A hydraulic 
drilling machine is in use, which 
is capable of drilling to a depth of 
2000 feet. It has a walking beam 
attachment for going through hard 
rock; also, a duplex Dempster 
diaphragm pump, five inch dia- 
meter with eight inch stroke, and 
a 15 horse-power engine. Mes- 
quite wood, which grows abun- 
dantly here, is used for fuel. 
This company was the first to 
enter the desert with drilling ma- 
chinery. They first sunk a well to 
the depth of 610 feet, which cav- 
ing, caused them to lose their 
tools, and the well was abandoned. 
The first forty feet was surface 
soil; then came seventy feet of 
clay and thirty feet of bluish sand- 
stone. Here, at a depth of 140 
feet, artesian water of good quality 
was struck, which flowed over the 
top of the casing. After this the 
following formations were en- 
countered: Twenty feet of fine 
clay, fifty feet of sandy clay, sixty 
feet of clay shale, fifty feet of 
coarse, porous, light-brown sand- 
stone, containing small white 
quartz pebbles. 

Palms Springs district embraces 
the territory north of Fish Creek 
district to the Riverside county 
line. It includes what is known 
as "Salton Sea" and adjacent 
territory on the west and south. 

The surface of the country gen- 
erally in Seventeen Palms Springs 
district is very much like that al- 
ready described in the districts 
lying south, especially as they re- 
late to the exposures of sandstone 
and clay shales. The fossils are 
not so numerous, but the gypsum 
is even more plentiful than in the 
first and second districts, and there 
are more mineral springs. There 
are concreted fossil shells in 
Sec. 34, T. n S., R. 9 E. There 
are fossils also in section 26 of 
this township. Among other forms 
the remains of the fossil horse 
(Equus occidentalis) were found 
here by Mr. C. S. Alverson. The 
absence of fossils in much of this 
district may be due to the Quater- 
nary deposits which overlie most 
of the territory, and bury the 
Neocene rocks. 

There are gas-wells in sections 
29 and 32, T. n S;, R. 10 E. Small 
domes are builded around them, 
which are probably the result of 
internal pressure. They emit gas 
continuously, which burns with a 
steady flame when applied with a 
match. In Sec. 5, T. 12 S., R. 10 
E., about one mile south of the 
previously described wells, are 
two other places where gas es- 
capes. Here are domes built up 
above the surrounding plain, and 
through which the gas finds its 
way to the surface. The water in 
all these wells or escapes is im- 
pregnated with mineralsubstances, 
unfitting them for domestic use. 

In section 7, about one-third of 
a mile from McCain Springs, a 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



" soda" spring issues from a low 
bill. There are also "soda" 
springs in Sec. 36, T. 10 S., R. 9 
E. In section 5 is a mud spring 
strongly impregnated with soda or 
other minerals. 

Nearly pure asphaltum is found 
in Sec. 7, T. 11 S., R 10 H.; also 
in sections 29 and 32 in the same 
township, and in sections 34 and 
35, T. 10 S.. Range 10 E. 

Ithasbein suggested tbat the 
overlying yuatenary deposits pre- 
vent the exudation ot the hydio- 
carbons in many places, which 
would otherwise appear on the 
surface. Doubtless the shifting 
sands have much to do with it, as 
they have in covering underlying 
strata, fossils, etc. 

In whatever direction one turns 
he is impressed with the vastness 
of the erosion tbat has taken place 
here in past time. The higher 
hills and peaks along Carri/o Creek 
Valley are 4000 feet above the 
present bed of the creek, and their 
summits have possibly been very 
much eroded and are considerably 
lower than they were formerly, 
and the creek bed may be filled 
with eroded material many feet 
deep. The washes are exceed- 
ingly numerous and probably ex- 
tend over 1000 square miles in 
this desert district. Millions of 
cubic yards of eroded land was 
first washed into the ocean, of 
what was probably then an ex- 



tension of the Gulf of Calii 
This in time became dry land, and 
in turn has been eroded, leaving 
an elevation of considerable height 
along the rim of the mountains for 
more than 100 miles. 

The waters of the old tertiary 
sea which once prevailed here 
must have been extremely favora- 
ble to the propogation of the 
growth of mollusks, especially 
oysters. After the first erosion 
that has taken place there are 
many square miles of fossil beds, 
especially of oyster beds, which in 
places are 200 feet thick, and may 
extend downward to a much 
greater depth. They not only ex- 
ist in vast numbers but in many 
varieties, from the small shell 
which is in evidence over so much 
of the territory, forming almost 
mountains in height and extent, 
to varieties nearly a foot loug and 
I to others weighing several pounds 
each. One variety is nearly as 
round and as large as a dinner 
plate. At this time the Colorado 
River brought a vast volume of 
fresh water containing carbonate 
of lime into a comparatively shal- 
low sea, while Carrizo Creek, San 
Felipe Creek and other streams 
drained a large district of country. 
The rainfall at that time was much 
greater than now, and the fresh 
water, with its lime and food, 
commingling with the salt water 
of the numerous arms of tbe sea. 



ind estuaries, made this 
paradise for mollusks. l>r J. (, 
Cooper believes that (he f< 
found here belong to a somewhat 
different period than nny yet de 
scribed from the Pacific Coast 
He thinks thnt the upper cretace- 
ous is probably represented in 
certain characteristics hitherto 
found only east of the Rocky 
Mountains. He further says that 
fragments of fossiliferous rocks 
have been found here that repre- 
sent t'ie carboniferous age, but 
further investigation must deter- 
mine this. Taken as a whole it is 
by far the largest deposit of fossils 
yet reported from the Pacific 
slope. 

The following companies are re- 
corded in the County Clerk's office 
of San Diego County as having lo- 
cated claims in the Colorado Des- 
ert mining district: Cactus Oil 
company, Carri/o Creek Oil com- 
pany, Flowing Wells Oil com- 
pany, Helvetia Investment com- 
pany, Longrehr Oil and Develop- 
ment company, New York Oil and 
Improvement company, Palm 
Springs Oil company, San Diego 
Desert Oil company, San Diego 
Oil Belt company, San Diego Oil 
and Development company, Sig- 
nal Mountain Oil company, Sig- 
nal Mountain Exploration and De- 
velopment company, Success Oil 
ctmpany, Vallecitos Oil company, 
and Yuha Oil company. 



a Beaumont Oil Decreasing. 

■uced oil 
men generally are reported to be 
at a loss to account for the de- 
crease in the Bow of the oil wells 
at Beaumont, Texas. A geological 
survey, which Dr William B, 
1 helps will direct, is soon to 
make a careful investigation of 
the strange action of the former 
gushers. 

The well drillers have noticed 
that the flow of oil in some of the 
wells in the Beaumont district was 
spasmodic; that they would spurt 
the fluid with their old time vigor 
for a few minutes and would then 
almost completely die out. When 
this occurred in the older wells it 
was believe! that the pipes had 
become clogged. In the new 
wells it was thought the spas- 
modic flow was caused by gas 
pockets and that the real oil basin 
had ni t yet been reached. 

This condition has become so 
general, however, that it is now 
admitted by the oil men and 
dealers that the flow of all the 
wells is rapidly decreasing in 
volume. They hold the opinion 
that this result is due to the nu- 
merous wells that have been bored 
and the consequent decrease of 
pressure in the basin of oil. Ge- 
ologists and oil men are unable to 
account for this peculiar demon- 
stration on the part of these 
wells. — Mining and Metallurgy. 



4 

5 

i 

4 

i 

I 

$ 
$ 
J 
% 

4 
% 

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KERR'S REPORTS 

OIL COMPANY DIAGNOSIS 

The only systematized oil rating and reporting agency in the world. 



3K 



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Field Investigators, 
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IN WESTERN AND SOUTHERN OIL FIELDS., 



We have no interest or official connection with 
oil companies. 

" WE ALWAYS KNOW." 

FEES AND CHARGES: A simple, general char- 
acter report, $2.00; details cost more. Our Monthly 
Investment tables with key giving estimates on oil 
companies, West and South, $25.00 for six months, 
under certain conditions free; 3,000 companies listed. 
Send address and claims of the oil company inquired 
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We make credit examinations the same as the 
mercantile agencies. We find the cash values, esti- 
mate land values and oil property and assets. Our 
abstract searchers are the best known and most com- 
petent firms in California and Texas. 

Our field investigators are men who make maps, 
men who drill wells and men hired by this office who 
actually investigate. 






Competent, unbiased, commercial oil reports re- 
quire skill, money and brains. Free oil advice is 
neatly always worthless, or merits suspicion. In- 
vestors must not be lead astray by a few oil jackal 
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information in an " Information column," the editor 
getting a "rake off" for his services. 

We give authentic field maps constantly corrected 
and brought down to date by competent field men. 
We sell commercial information on oil progress, pro- 
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of what it would cost you to investigate. We give 
the legal history of a company, if stock is assessable, 
the validity of leases, the amount of royalties, the 
conditions of transportation, prices and competition. 

We tell you how to buy. 

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We tell you where to buy. 

We tell you when to sell. 

We keep the investor constantlv posted on the 
progress of his deal. SEND FOR PROSPECTUS. 



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Mills Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



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PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Kndopsed By the California Petroleum 
Miners' Association. 



W B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 
Office and Editorial Rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Telephone, Bush, 176 

TERMS 

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Six Months 150 

Th rek Months 1 00 

Si nole Copies. 10c 

bTRICTLY IN A.DVA.NCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
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U-32-33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name ana address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 



Rntered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal 
*ft second-class matter. 



I'RIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1901. 

" Darkest before the dawn," is a 
saying that ap- 
Better Times plies to the oil 
in Prospect industry of 
California at 
this time. The present condition 
of affairs is deplorable. 

The price of oil at Coalinga, 
Bakersfield and Los Angeles is 
much lower than it should be. 

Fuel oil should be sold at a fig- 
ure that will simply make it a suc- 
cessful competitor with coal. There 
is no reason why it should be sold 
at a lower figure. 

Oil has so many advantages 
over coal as a fuel there is no 
reason why it should be offered 
at prices that practically make it 
fifty per cent cheaper than coal. 
Yet it has been offered at this fig- 
ure, and is still being offered. 

The main reason for these ruin- 
ous prices is the necessity of many 
small producers to obtain ready 
money to meet pressing bills for 
machinery, labor, land payments 
and the like. A producer who 
has a few thousand barrels in the 
sump hole, and who needs a few 
hundred dollars at once will sell 
his oil at any old price, especially 
as his oil is lying exposed to sun 
and air, and this exposure is mak- 
ing it every day less valuable. If 
he cannot get forty cents, he will 
take thirty; if he cannot get thirty 
he will take twenty or less, 

Very many such sales have been 
made, and will continue to be 
made, and as long as they con- 
tinue so long will the price of oil 
fluctuate, and be lower than it 
should be so far as the relative 
fuel value of coal and oil is con- 
cerned. 

Another reason why oil is lower 
than it should be is that the de- 
mand is not as great as it naturally 
should be. Many would-be users 
of fuel oil are deterred from chang- 
ing their furnaces from coal to oil- 
burning for the reason the supply 



of oil is not certain on account of 
the lack of transportation. 

Only a few days ago the small 
concern known as the United Pro- 
ducers' Oil company was totally 
unable to supply its dozen or more 
patrons with oil because its supply 
was exhausted and it could obtain 
no more on account of lack of 
transportation and other reasons. 
Its patrons would have been 
obliged to shut down their works 
had not the Standard Oil company 
come to the rescue, and solely for 
the reason it did not want to see 
the reputation of the fuel oil in- 
dustry impaired, supplied the pa- 
trons of the United Producers 
with the oil which enabled them 
to continue their business unin- 
terruptedly. 

The railroads are making every 
effort to supply oil tank cars fast 
enough to keep pace with the in- 
creasing demand, and they will 
soon have a large number that are 
now being completed at the shops. 
The Standard Oil company ex- 
pects the early arrival of sixty 
cars from the East. These addi 
tions will have a material effect in 
increasing transportation facilities, 
and in giving would-be consumers 
the assurance of an abundant sup- 
ply of fuel when wanted. 

There is no gainsaying the fact 
that the uncertainty as to the out- 
come of the proposed oil combine 
of companies in the Kern River 
district has had a depressing effect 
on the crude oil market. Those 
chiefly interested in the success of 
the combine, and those who are 
expected to profit most if it is 
effected, express confidence that 
it will be formed next January, 
and will include practically all 
the producing companies in the 
field. 

Others who are equally well in- 
formed aver the enterprise is not 
practicable, and that a large pro- 
portion of the producers will have 
nothing to d<> with it. 

Whether it is a success or fail- 
ure, this fact is true, viz.: that the 
present uncertainty with regard 
to it is having a most depressing 
effect on the Kern River field, is 
retarding developing work, and is 
depressing the price of oil. 

Meanwhile the Standard Oil 
company is rushing its preparatory 
work on its pipe line from Bakers- 
field to the bay. The pipe is be- 
ing built as rapidly as possible in 
several Eastern plants, and in a 
short while it will commence to 
arrive here by the train load. 

The line will require over 300 
miles of pipe, with pumping 
stations at intervals throughout the 
line. 

It will require at least six months 
before it is finished, by which 
time the refinery at Point Rich- 
mond will be well on its way to- 
wards completion. 

When the pipe line is ready for 
business, when the various re- 
fineries now proposed or under 
way are completed, then we may 
expect to see better times in the 



oil business, a steady market and 
satisfactory prices. 

The present unsatisfactory state 
of affairs is only temporary. It 
is the same with all new and im- 
portant industries. There is no 
reason for discouragement, no 
cause for growling. 

The oil industry is all right. It 
rests en a sure foundation. Better 
and more prosperous times are in 
store. It is only a matter of a few 
months before the growlers will 
be missing and the wails of woe 
will be changed into songs of 
rejoicing. 



DRILLING MISHAPS 



Accidents That Are Liable to 
Occur in Drilling Oil Wells. 

Mishaps or accidents in petro- 
leum well engineering may be 
attributed to several causes, among 
which the chief are the caving in 
of loose sands, obstructions to cas- 
ing and pipes, deviation of boring 
tools, flooding with water, deposit- 
ing of foreign articles in the bore- 
hole, breaking of rods, pipes, con- 
nections, etc. Landslips, says the 
Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, fre- 
quently occur at all wells. Land- 
slips which cause the boring of 
the day to refill with loose sands 
is one of the most costly to the 
engineer, and every precaution is 
taken to prevent a repetitionby the 
use of strong casing and applica- 
tion of water. The force of water 
is utilized to counterbalance the 
movement of the sands, and its 
volume when properly applied is 
usually sufficient to retain the 
beds in position. Sometimes we 
meet with accidents in which the 
loosened end of the casing is in a 
wabbly condition and liable " to 
produce trouble, d'ie to the work- 
ing loose of the adjoining bolts, 
and the slipping away of the sand 
near the bottom of the bore. "Lost 
tubes" are of frequent occurrence, 
as all engineers are aware, due to 
the unskillful fastenings at the 
joints. When a landslip happens 
the first thing to do is to raise the 
boring device and ascertain the 
nature of the deposits. If sand, 
then the sand pump can be put 
into service and the debris pumped 
out. If solid rocks fall in, then 
re-drilling is necessary. Often re- 
peated sand pumping and re- 
drilling are necessary for days be- 
fore a certain delicate spot in the 
strata is passed, after which the 
caving in may cease. 

It is a singular thing how many 
wells have been abandoned, or at 
least the original pipe, because of 
the indenting of a portion of the 
pipe wall by a rock or other ob- 
struction. Of course the inward 
pressure of the exterior object 
soon forces the pipe wall inward, 
and the mechanisms of the well 
are not permitted to pass this ob- 
struction in the cylinder. There 
are several types of devices in use 
for overcoming these indented 
piprs. There are expanding man- 
drills which can be inserted into 
a pipe when closed and small in 



diameter, and when opposite the 
fracture, a tapered screw is 
operated from the top to expand 
the mandrill and force out the 
indented portion of the pipe. 
Other forms are driven down from 
above, and the pipe wall pressed 
to original shape. The simple in- 
denting of a pipe need never inter- 
fere with the working of the - ell 
if proper means are taken to 
restore the fracture. Sometimes, 
however, indented pipes become 
so severely cracked as to need new 
sections put in. 

Premature spouting would ap- 
pear to bother the workman about 
as much as anything. If the ropes 
or rods are in the bore theie may 
be no time to get the top of the 
pipe capped. If the bore is free, 
the first thing to do is to jump for 
the cap for the tube, and these 
caps ought to be at hand always. 
As soon as indications of spouting 
are noticed the workman can ap- 
ply the cap promptly. If the rod 
is in the tube, trouble may 
occur unless devises are at 
hand which will permit closing a 
tube with the boring devices in it. 
A readily made device for this 
work consists of a solid flange with 
four sectionsin slots of grooves; by 
means of screws fitted in a sur- 
rounding ring into the heads of 
the sections, these are easily 
pressed together against the boring 
rod, so as to close the well. 

It would astonish anyone travel- 
ing among the wells to note the 
numerous cases of untrue drilling. 
The Reporter's correspondent 
observed a number of cases in 
which the hole was cut out of line, 
because of the springing of the shaft 
of the tool above the bit. One in- 
stance is recorded of deviation of 
the cutting tool, because of the 
improper coupling used for joining 
the boring tool shaft with the 
upper section shaft. Here the 
coupling, instead of being properly 
fitted with keys or set screws was 
merely bored through for pins and 
these pins were loosened and 
sprung, resulting in the wobbly 
condition of the cutting tool, which 
caused the drilling to be untrue. 
The best way tc overcome devia- 
tions is to find out first where the 
untrue portion started. Then re- 
fill the hole with crushed rock 
up to the true section. After ihis 
rock, pack with the sand and mud, 
so as to be like the original earth; 
rebore, and the chances are that 
the hole will be straight, providing 
the drill is right. Of course the 
different stratifications of some 
ground are such that the drills 
take untrue courses even when 
right. The bedding may be such 
that a drill is forced to one side. 
These are the chances to be taken 
in boring and cannot be avoided. 
Often the strata are such that it is 
necessary to shift the plant en- 
tirely, and operate it in a new 
position. As a rule, however, 
with good devices and patience, 
the original hole need not be 
deserted. 



THE YANKEE GIRL. 






REPORTKR 



Eatttcrn Cnpltnl Becoming 

Largely Intcrc-ud In tlii- 

Succc»-tftil l.nterprinc. 

The latest reports from the 
Yankee Girl Oil company are to 
the effect that matters are going 
along in a most satisfactory man- 



bloci. .ring them 

against any poasibh ! lak- 

' lie element of risk entirely 

away from the investment. The 

ma- 
chinery, Hols, etc.. the manage- 
ment is experienced in the practi- 
cal work of drilliug wells, and u 
its territory is in the Kern River, 



11 the north. Both 
of li paniea ha- 

barrel well, ami will soon li .. 
number of producing wells. 

The Yankee Girl will soon have 

tny wells as their neighbors, 

ben they start in, they intend 

to drill wells as rapidly as possible. 

The company's wells in I.i s An- 





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1 




IB 


Kii'SBB 




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iccnmulate are now beii 
burned out in the Kern field ti 
protect the field from fires at a 
time when they might not be so 
easily controlled and to avoid the 
possibility of oil escaping into the 
canals and onto the agricultural 
land il a hard storm should come. 

Bad For Texas. 

The market for Texas fuel oil 
is thoroughly demoralized, salts 
having been made at Deaumont as 
low as two and one-half cents a 
barrel b) some of the smaller com- 
panies. The larger companies, it 
is feared, will be compelled to fol- 
low suit before long, since the 
Texes anli trust laws prevent any 
agreement for the maintenance of 
prices. lix Governor Hogg is 
authority lor the statement that 
he sees Utile hone for the Texas 
oil industry as long as these con- 
ditions continue, Texas is tasting 
ilie bitter fruits of her antitrust 
legislatu.il sunner than anyone 
had anticipated. 



I.OS Angeles Wells of the Yankee Girl Oil Company 



ner. Recently some influential 
Eastern capitalists have Interested 
themselves quite extensively in 
the affairs of the Yankee Girl, and 
have subscribed for large amounts 
of stock. This company owns 
such valuable property that it is 
able to give bonds as security to 
those who have invested in large 



McKittrick and Sunset districts 
there is no doubt but that when 
the drill starts dropping it is only 
a matter of a few hundred feet 
before it will reach prolific oil 
saud. In the Kern River the land 
owned by the Yankee Girl lies be- 
tween that of the York Oil Syndi- 
cate on the west and the Volcan 



geles continue to produce most 
satisfactorily. The company has 
a contract which enables them to 
dispose of their Los Angeles out- 
put at a good marketable price. 



Burning Waste Oil. 

Oil sumps in which non-mer- 
chantable oils have been allowed 



Decline in Eastern Output. 

There was another decline of 
over a half million barrels in the 
net stocks of Pennsylvania oil dur- 
ing October, while the Buckeye 
stocks again show an increase. 
The runs and shipments in both 
sections show gains over Septem- 
ber, while the combined stocks 
are lower than at any time for the 
past year. The Buckeye runs 
were the largest of the year, 
while the shipments fell a little 
below those of August. The total 
decrease in the stocks of both 
regions was above 300,000 barrels. 



AA/V«>AAA^«V^A*A(W>AA»****/\*.<W<^|^*********/******** 



* /k +* / *** /s '**+*'*+'+'*+*™'*++++A*^^ 



Choice Oil Land for Sale 

We have been authorized to sell three pieces of land in Section 13, Township 29, Range 28, in that portion of the 

Kern River Oil district known as 

SOUTH OF KERN RIVER 

?:»«■: S": *: ^ ^B ^«T«^ ? 

It is all patented land and the title is guaranteed. 

The Chicago Extension is now drilling on the land adjoining, with every prospect of striking oil. 

The Wizard Oil Company is drilling southwest of us. 

The Panorama had 150 feet of oil sand on Section 14, adjoining us, but lost the well. 

The land is only a mile south of Discovery well, where oil was first struck in the Kern River District. 

There is no doubt but that with a proper rig for drilling in the soft formations oil will be struck here at about 1500 feet. 

We will sell this land in a body, or will split it up into three pieces. 

We are able to offer it for a short time only at 

$60 PER ACRE 

This is over 50 per cent lower than any land is offered in this portion of the district. 

EASY TERMS EASY TERMS 

For maps and further information apply to 

THE PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



^ yyyy^VyyVVi/VVVVWVV V VVVWWAVVVVW 



pacific oil rSp orter 



8CRIPPERS AGAIN LOSE. 



Wells Can Be Drilled and the Oil 
Removed. 

A decision was handed down 
last Friday in the Circuit Court of 
Appeals in the cases of the Pacific 
Land and Improvement company 
vs. the Elwood Oil company, and 
the Cosmos Exploration company 
'vs. the Gray Eagle Oil company, 
in which the decision of the lower 
court in both cases is affirmed and 
the injunction asked for, restrain- 
ing the defendants from boring 
wells and removing the oil from 
certain lands in Kern county, is 
denied. The decision was written 
by Judge Hawley, with Judge 
Morrow concurring, while Judge 
Gilbert wrote a dissenting opinion. 
The two cases are considered 
jointly, as the same points are 
involved in both of them. 

The suit involved title to certain 
lands claimed by both parties to 
the suit. The Pacific Land and 
Improvement company basing its 
claim to the land on an agri 
cultural filing purchased from one 
J. R. Johnson, while the defend 
ants based theirs on mineral claims 
filed by themselves. In this re- 
gard the opinion reads as follows: 
"We aire of the opinion that the 
Federal courts are without juris- 
diction to entertain suit to deter- 
mine respective rights to any lands 
to which title remains in the 
United States, in regard to which 
contest between parties is pend- 
ingin the Land Department. An 
action of ejectment cannot be 
maintained in the courts of the 
United States on merely an equit- 
able title. The averments in the 
bill are susceptible of the construc- 
tion that the defendants are in 
possession of the land in contro- 
versy. While such a bill might 
be entertained under state laws, 
it is not cognizable by a Federal 
court of equity, the remedy being 
at law." 

Judgment in the Circuit Court 
in both cases was affirmed with 
costs. The opinion also dealt with 
the merits of the controversy, in 
which it was decided the. defend- 
ants had the best title to the lands 
in dispute. 

Judge Hawley, in his decision, 
further says: 

"The general rule is settled that 
the right to a patent once vested 
is treated by the government in 
dealing with the public lands as 
equivalent to a patent issued, and 
when a patent does issue, it relates 
back to the inception of the right 
of the patentee. It is true that no 
valid location of a mining claim 
can be made until the discovery of 
mineral. It does not, however, 
follow that because no mineral 
was found the land in question 
was unoccupiad. 

"The possessory rights of the 
miners have been recognized by 
law, although, in all such cases, 
the legal title to the land remains 
in the government. No right can 
be initiated on government land 



which is in the actual possession 
of another by aforcible, fraudulent 
or clandestine entry thereon." 

The judgment of the Circuit 
Court in both cases is affirmed 
with costs. Judge Morrow con- 
curred with JurJge Hawley in the 
majority opinion. 

Judge Gilbert, in his dissenting 
opinion says: "Theright of explora- 
tion for miners upon the public 
domain is but a license. It does 
not, prior to discovery, constitute 
a legal right in or to the land on 
which exploration is made. Until 
discovery of the mineral, the law 
gives a psrson no right whatever 
except to defend himself against 
the invasion of another who has 
ho greater right." 



CHEAPER GAS INSIGHT. 



A Less Expensive Oil to Be Used 
in its Manufacture. 

There is a prospect of cheaper 
gas. 

The directors of the Fresno Gas 
and Electric company held a meet- 
ing night before last, at which 
they decided to make extensive 
improvements in their plant, and 
extend their system by laying ad- 
ditional mains. The improve- 
ments contemplated will not make 
any noticeable difference in the 
exterior of the plant, as most of 
the additions and improvements 
will be in the interior and will 
consist of new methods of making 
gas. Already the company has 
been making gas of Coalinga oil, 
and it is now proposed to use a 
cheaper kind of crude petroleum. 
It has been learned that this cheap 
oil makes just as good gas as 
higher priced oil, and that being 
true, the directors of the company 
have decided when the extension 
of the plant and system has been 
accomplished, to reduce the price. 
A short time ago a new holder 
was set up by the company, and 
it is now said that that was just a 
beginning of what is to follow in 
the way of additions and improve- 
ments, and the moral of it all is 
that gas will be cheaper. 



20 cents a barrel, f . o. b. ■ cars, 
Gladys City or Beaumont. The 
statistics below represent about the 
actual production down to the 
present time: 
Total shipments oil to Nov. i.... 1,500,000 

Amount in storage 900,000 

Waste from Lucas, Beaumont- 
Palestine and other gushers. ..1,000,000 

Total barrels 3,400,000 

That is, the field has produced 
in nine months about 3,400,000 
barrels of oil, of which 1,000,000 
barrels have gone to waste. As a 
rough estimate, these figures are 
probably about as accurate as any 
that have been made. To make 
the total shipment of 1,500,000 
barrels, would require a demand 
of 10,000 barrels a day for five 
months. What the possible pro- 
duction of the field would be, were 
all the wells flowing at full head, 
is still an entirely unknown propo- 
sition. 



AT LOS ANGELES. 



The Beaumont Production. 

The New York Commercial cor- 
respondent declares that the total 
producing capacity of the sixty- 
nine gushers in the Beaumont oil 
fields is 1,490,000 barrels a day. 
The Oil City Derrick says, if the 
district could produce this amount 
of oil in twenty-four hours, the 
field is certainly a wonder, but 
there are a great many skeptics on 
this subject. The domestic con- 
sumption is confined almost ex- 
clusively to Texas and Louisiana, 
chiefly in the locomotives of rail- 
ways, electric light and street car 
plants, water works, factories, 
mills, cotton compresses, sugar re- 
fineries, breweries, laundries, and 
every character of plant in which 
large quantities of fuel are used in 
the generation of steam. Domestic 
consumption is greatly accelerated 
by the prevailing low prices, 10 to 



No Price Fixed fop the Sale of 
Crude Petroleum. 

Last Friday was the day set for 
the fixing of the price of Los An- 
geles oil. On Saturday the Herald 
contained the following: 

No price has been fixed as the 
selling rate for oil from the local 
field. The members of the pro- 
ducers' committee met yesterday 
afternoon with the president of 
the Oil Storage Company and very 
thoroughly canvassed the situa- 
tion, and without any. disagree- 
ment whatever, but merely accept- 
ing the situation as it stands, it 
was decided to make no selling 
rate whatever at this time. 

The reasons for such cction are 
not far to seek. With contract oil 
in the field at 60 cents, and odd 
lots being offered at a very much 
cheaper rate, there is not much 
use in making a futile attempt to 
raise the selling price of oil. Yes- 
terday one small producer called 
upon a business acquaintance and 
told him that he had to have some 
ready money. There was no use 
discussing probabilities, he had to 
have it, and he thereupon offered 
1000 barrels at 45 cents for ready 
cash. While producers are at all 
inclined to make sales of that kind 
there can be no revival of prices. 

The committee considered the 
advisability of accepting several 
fairly large contracts for long 
periods, but it was determined to 
not accept the proposals made, on 
account of the low price offered 
In the meantime, for immediate 
sales, discretion is left with the Oil 
Storage Company to do what is 
deemed best in the premises. If 
that company so elects it can 
peddle the oil out at 20 cents a 
barrel, and in the face of the cut- 
ting being being done by some 
producers in the field it is not at 
all unlikely that there will be 
much cheaper oil before it inclines 
decisively upward. 

At the present time things are 
badly conditioned, but the future 
contains much of promise. There 



is no longer any outside oil that 
can do the local product much 
harm by competition, and conse- 
quently the local producers have 
to work out their own salvation. 
It is sought by some of these to 
throw the burden of working it 
out onto the shoulders of a few, 
the remainder not objecting to 
participate, however, in any good 
results that may be brought about. 
It is only a matter of time until*a 
refinery will take the surplus oil 
of the field and then matters will 
he en train for $1 oil. But by that 
time a number of the producers 
who are being compelled by their 
present necessities to bear the 
market to a ridiculous extent will 
be sold out and the ground will be 
clear for the marketing of the 
product along business lines. 

DRILLED INTO GOLD. 



Yet Were Only Lookirg For Oil 
Over in Madera Counly 

There is some excitement among 
the stockholders of ' the Sin Joa- 
quin River Oil company, which, 
boring for oil over in Madera 
county, has apparently struck a 
vein of pure gold. The drill as 
stated worked for some time and 
finally pierced a very hard sub- 
stance at a depth of 700 to 800 feet. 
It is in this hard substance that the 
gold has been found. That is to 
say, there is an old Chinaman at 
the camp engaged to do the. cook- 
ing, and he took it into his head 
to wash out some of the bailings 
from the oil well. He it was that 
discovered the gold nuggets of 
about the size of a pea flattened. 



An Inexpensive Well. 

The drill will begin working on 
Mountain Boy No. 2 on section 22, 
32-33 one day this month. Well 
No. 1, which was completed several 
weeks ago, is said to have cost the 
least amount of money of any well 
ever before drilled in the county 
and is considered one of the lead- 
ing producers of the district in 
which it is located. Twenty-nine 
towers, or fourteen and one-half 
days after the machinery was 
started up, the well was completed 
at a depth of 620 feet, with riffj- 
inch casing and 190 feet of rich oil 
sand. The casing will be per- 
forated within a few days. — Cali- 
fornian. 

Standard flock Refinery. 

Report has just come to the city 
that the living, cooking and board- 
ing houses of the company are 
now erected and that the founda- 
tions for the refining kettles are 
being laid, while the latter have 
been shipped from San Francisco 
to Sargent's station, about 354 
miles from the tar beds. 

Only one more week can this 
stock be bought at 20 cents per 
share. After that the price of 
these valuable shares will be raised 
to 50 cents per share without fail. 
Don't delay as this is positively 
your last chanee to purchase this 
stock at 20 cents per shaie. 



PACIFIC OIL RKI'ORTI-R 



THB KERN FIELD. 

DullncoH in Operation-. Attributed 
to the Combine. 

Field operations are fast coming 
to a standstill in the Kern River 
districts The scores of oil well 
workers who rushed to this field 
from New York. Pennsylvania. 
Ohio and \K\st Virginia, arriving 
at the conclusion that operations 
will not be resumed for some lime, 
are returning Bast and the Kern 
River field is presenting a more 
pronounced appearance of sus- 
pended animation today than at 
any other time during its history. 
n weeks ago indications of an 
active winter were l>riglit. busi- 
ness generally was looking up; 
hut no sooner had the organization 
of the Associated Oil companies 
been announced than the bottom 
dropped out and the rosy hopes 
vanished. The present condition 
is generally blamed on (he com- 
bine If that question isdefinitely 
settled one way or the other in 
the near future there is a possi- 
bility of a resumption rf opera- 
tions. But the popular verdict 
among Kern Oil men and opera- 
tors is that the field will witness 
little or no change for a year or 
more— until the Standard gets into 
a position to consume the surplus 
supply at its Point Richmond re- 
finery or through the establish- 
ment of some new market. 



In the mehnlime the prob:< 

ug out The refinery which 
tO have In 
ford is being built on i.ith strett, 
Bakerstiell, and the Union 
company is pushing forward pre 
limiiiary work for its refinery 
On the other hand many com- 
panies that have been pumping 
oil into sump holes are scting the 
error of such a course and are 
shutting in their wells. All these 
are good signs, and the Rkpoktkr 
is more confident than ever in its 
repeated statement that the ulti- 
mate solution must ctme in a per- 
fectly natural and legitimate 
way. Time is working out the 
truth of tins proposition, even 
faster than many suppose, for 
a temporal y stagnant enterprise 
moves slowly, yet none the less 
surely. The greatest obstacle en- 
countered so far has been the pro- 
posed combine, which has done 
already great damage to the busi- 
ness aucl given Bakersfield a com- 
mercial black eye which will be 
noticeable in all lines of local trade 
for many months. Truly this is 
the proverbially dark hour before 
dawn, in Calilornia oildoru. 



B the drill again. The Stral 
ton. just over the hill from the 
latter, continues to llow a stream 
into the sump hole, but the rasing 
DOl being landed, work will be 
resumed shortly and the well 
drilled deeper. At the I.ueky Hoy 
camp, close to the Stratton, work 
is also to be resumed and the well 
drilled two or three hundred feet 
deeper. The Stratton's strike was 
made at 1200 and the Lucky Boy 
is down only 1000 feet. By going 
o the same level it seems almost 
certain that the company will 
strike the same sand. 



, Activity in NorthernSunset 

There is already evidence of 
more stir in northern Sunset, says 
the Echo. The California Fortune, 
Colorado California, Golden Gate 
and other companies are making 
good progress on new wells and 
now the Nanticope is sending 



Oil in German Steamers. 

Oil operators will be interested 
in the fact that the Hamburg- 
Americau Steamship company has 
just had two ol its steamers fitted 
for the use of liquid fuel. One of 
these has lately arrived at her 
home port from Suez, where she 
had the apparatus fitted. It is 
remarked that in most British 
steamers fitted for liquid fuel the 
oil is sprayed on the fire by steam; 
in these two German steamers it 
is sprayed simply by the pressure 
under which the oil is forced to 
the burners. 



'ff into lots o 
convenient size, dm a be- 

ing made for streets and avenues. 
Though several applications have 
already been made for property in 
this tiuct it <vas only within the 
last day or two that lots were 
placed on sale. Plans have been 
made for the construction of a 
hotel and a few business places. 

It is also reported that local 
firms will establish a branch ma- 
chine shop and lumber yard at 
Sunset City. — Iicho. 



Sunset City. 

Now that the opening of the 
Sunset road is at most only a few 
day's distant preparations are be 
ing made to commence the build- 
ing of a town at the southwestern 
terminus of the road. The site 



New Incorporations. 

'flu- following companies tiled articles 
hi incorporation with the Secretary of 
State last week: 

Ohio Oil and Development company. 
Principal place ol business, Yuma, Ariz 
Directors: R.H.Corbey, l.aura Rosenau, 

J. I'. Cafes, J. M. Sliielils ami Maud 
Shield?. Capital stock, $250,000. 

Western Wyoming oil company. 
Principal place of business, Cos Angeles. 
Directors: C. E. Price, B. A. Doran, A. 
C. Ilronse, J. W. Kemp, C. L. Clafflill 
anil 12. R. Bishop. Capital stock, #500,- 
000; subscribed %~j. 

Mascot (til company. Principal place 
of business, Hakcrsfield. Directors: J. 
A. Stroud, J. L. Scott, J. 0. Clulter, T. 
M. McNamara and M. C. Smith. Capi- 
tal stock, 1500,000; subscribed, J5C0. 

The Mercantile Refining company. 
Principal place of business, San Fran- 
cisco. Capital stock, 300,000, with J180, - 
000 subscribed, and Lincoln II. Lewars, 
George W. C. Baker, Angler liaker, Leo 
Dietle, Arthur Dietle, Andrew J. Baker 
and John II. Clark of San Francisco as 
directors. 

The White Cygnet Oil company. 
Principal place of business, Oakland. 
Capital stock, $500,000, with $7 sub- 
scribed, and Charles E. Dunlevy, J. W. 
Manck, I' - L. Shirlan, Ed. A. Dulip of 
San Francisco, William Stuart, A. Ran- 
kin and James Rankin, Sr., of Oakland 
as directors. 



20c Asphaltum Refinery 20c 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure 

Gilt=Edged Stock 



One More Week Only at 20 Cents, 

We leased land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have just secured 

6000 ACRES 0000 ACRES 

of laud that produces untold quantities of asphalt 
near Sargenls Station. 



Next Week the Price Will Be 50 Cents. 

We have concluded contracts for the sale of all our 
asphalt at a figure which will enable us to pay divi- 
dends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract carload lots for crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses and foundation for Refining Works 
are NOW under construction. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Inside of ten days you will have to pay 50 cents 
per share. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned inside of 90 
days. 



STANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY 

475=476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands iu Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 



10 



PACIFIC OtL REPORTER 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments In Oil In Various Parts 
of the State. 



COLUSA. 

The Herron Company has suspended 
operations for a while. 

The Minor Company's rig resumed 
work Tuesday morning of last week. 

The Orr & Meracle well is still being 
sent downward. 

The Bear Valley made about 175 feet 
of hole last week, and are now down 700 
feet. 

The Williams Home well on the .Brim 
ranch is down 1450 feet and working in 
a good quality of oil-bearing shale. 

The hole being drilled on the Gibson 
land by Hammond & Butters was down 
200 feet last week. Good progre s is be- 
ing made. 

Work on Smith & Gorrill's No. 3. has 
been interrupted by a caving, but its ex- 
tent is not known. Gold colors are re- 
ported to have been brought up. 

A letter received from Williams says 
the Williams Oil company let the sand 
pump down and it came up full of oil. 
The pump is about ten feet long and 
six inches through. 

The Chehalis Company has resumed 
operations and has commenced drilling a 
new hole thirteen feet from the old one, 
in the bottom of which is a drill that 
they were unable to recover. 

At the old Gibson gusher, which is 
now under the control of Butters & Ham- 
mond, they have commenced active 
work and are operating two shifts night 
and day which will be kept until this 
hole is thoroughly proven. 

Last week the drill at the " home well" 
on the Brim ranch passed through the 
shale formation and penetrated a hard 
sandstone. The sandstone carries oil 
and gas and is the most promising forma- 
tion yet discovered. 

Work is progressing nicely at the Gor- 
rell west of Arbuckle and two weeks ago 
the drill was working in oil-bearing 
shale, and 1 he three prevailing colors of 
oil found in this section, olive, russet and 
citron, can be plainly seen floating off on 
the top of the water. 

Drilling was resumed by the Chehalis 
crew on Friday the 8th, in a new hole. 
The latest news from there is that the 
work is proceeding nicely. More gas is 
being devel< ped and now at least 50 per 
cent is being saved by its combustion in 
the fire-box of the engine. Perhaps 
enough will be developed to take the 
place of other fuel entirely 



CONTRA COSTA. 
The Berkeley Crude well, near Lafay- 
ette, is down over 750 feet. Manager 
Arnold is greatly pleased with the indi- 
cations. 

The Grand Pacific has leased a portion 
of its land near Lafaye'te to the Golden 
West Oil company, which has resumed 
drilling on the well of the G rand Pacific 
which was left uncompleted at a little 
over 500 feet. 

The American Oil and Refinery com- 
pany, at work on the Minor ranch, are 
down 1250 feet, and have gas and a con- 
siderable showing of oil. A cave has 
delayed work a month. 

The well of the National Para Sine Oil 
company, near Lafayette, is now down 
over 950 feet, the drill being in a sand- 
stone formation. There is considerable 
oil and lots of gas in the well. A few 
days ago the gas was accidentally 
ignited and a flame burst forth thirty 
feet high, and it was only by great 
effjrt the derrick was saved.' The oil 
indications are favorable, and the direc- 
tors feel sure of a good strike of oil. 

KERN. 

The Mecca is ready to spud in at its 
new camp on section 19, 28 2S. 

The Vanderlip is spudding in on its 
second well in the Kern River field. 

The Del Ray on section 5, 29-28 is 
finishing up well No. 5 and is rigging up 
for No. 6. 

The Illinois Crude commenced work 
on its second well in the Kern River field 
last week. 

An 8-inch pipe line is being laid by 
the Standard from its main line to the 
Potomac wells on 29. ■ 

Obispo No. 1 has succeeded in getting 
the tools from its hole. The drill will 
aga'n be set at work. 

The Kern River at McKittrick has 
perforated a new well, No. 7, and has 
very good promise of another great well. 

The Klondyke Jewel is still operating 
on section 2, 30-21 and has a good show- 
ing for an early strike at the noo-foot 
level. 

The Jolly Joker has resume 1 work at 
its camp in the Midway field and will 
endeavor to complete the well started 
some time ago. 

The Famoso has cleaned out two of its 
wells on section 4, 29-28 preparatory to 
placing them on the beam. The com- 



Fishing Tools 



□ 

u 
n 
□ 
□ 
n 
n 
a 
□ 

♦ 



We are prepared to ship at once 
to any part of the State all kinds 
of Oil- Well drilling and Fishing 
Tools. 

SPEARS, 

SOCKETS, 

UNDER-REAMERS, 

PERFORATORS, 

RATCHET JACKS, 

RINGS and WEDGES. 

ANYTHING YOU WANT. 



PENNSYLVANIA DRILLING COMPANY 

BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 



pany's third well, estimated to be the 
largest in the bunch, is ready for per 
forating. 

A company of English capitalists has 
let the contract to put up sixteen der- 
ricks on section 4, 29-22 and will also 
sink a well on section 6 at once. 

The Monarch of California — not the 
Monarch of Sunset — is preparing to 
resume operations on the southwest 
quarter of section 34, 30-22. 

The Stevens, Kern river, has been 
placed en the pump. The well is doing 
about seventy-five barrels daily through 
mo feet of perforated casing. 

The Rio Bravo well in the Kern River 
district is making a very good record on 
the beam. It has now been pumping 
for severil days and with very satis- 
factory results. 

The Adirondack No. I, which was 
drilled to a depth of 1400 feet on 2, 30-21, 
will be lowered to the 1800-foot level un- 
less oil is struck in paying quantities 
before that point is reached. Work will 
be resumed soon. 

The Sunset Coast is now drilling with 
J. A. Bennett's new clamp and swivel 
devise and evervlhing is working satis- 
fartorilv. This new invention uses a 
wire cable instead of the Manila, which 
cable will outlast ten of the other kind. 

The Nineteen Oil Company, operating 
on section 19, 2S-28, has entered a very 
rich sand near the 1125 foot level. The 
water has been shut off properly and it 
is thought the well Will be completed 
within a day or two. It will be good for 
100 barrels daily. 

The Monte Cristo, on 25, 29-28, has 
nineteen wells completed and can fur- 
nish twenty carloads of oil daily. Two 
of its wells are gushers. New wells will 
be drilled as fast as possible. The com- 
pany is suffering from the present short- 
age of cars 

A shipment of 25,000 feet of lumber 
has been sent into the Devils Den dis- 
trict in. northwestern Kern, the material 
being for derricks, etc. Thus far de- 
velopment work in th- 1 locality has been 
rather slow, and few discoveries have 
been reported. 

The Vesta, on section 31, 28-28, is fin- 
ishing up a well from which the water 
necessary for the camp will be supplied. 
The company has three good oil wells 
and as soon as the water well is com- 
p'eted attention will be directed to 
adding more oil wells to its list. 

There have been conflicting rumors 
concerning the La Mesa Chiquita well 
on Rag Gulch, but this much has been 
learned beyond question: Oil has been 
found there and of a quality and quan- 
tity sufficient to pump if the company 
does nor strike something better further 
down. 

The Stevens well on section 18 has 
been given a trial on the beam and has 
been pumping a very handsome stream 
of oil. There was a time when the 
northwestern portion of the field was 
regarded with very little favor by the oil 
men, but the completion of several 
thrifty wells has proven that territory 
very valuable for its petroleum deposits. 

The Maricopa at Sunset has gone into 
the oil sand in its second well. The fact 
that it is located within a few rods of No. 
1, a very thrifty producer, made a strike 
very certain, but it was not so certain 
that the large casing — the eleven and 
five-eighths — could be sent down to a 
point very close to the first sand. The 
nine, and five 1 eighths string has been 
inserted and the drillers are very san- 
guine that the well will be completed 
with this casing. If successful in land- 
ing this casing below the rich strata 
found in No. 1, Manager Schwartz ex- 
pects to have one of the biggest wells in 
the field. 



LOS ANGELES. 

The latest from the Whittier field is as 
follows: 

Contractor Collins has the Warner Oil 
company's No. 6 down over 200 feet. 

The East Whittier Oil company's No. 
2 is down over 1400 feet with but three 
strinesof casing in the hole. 

The Whittier-Fillmore company's well 
on the Tubbs-Evans tract is down 1075 
feet with some indications of oil. 

Rubber packers are being used on 
Nos. 31 and 33, which Richard McCounell 
is drilling for the Central Oil company, 
to shut off water. 

The North Whittier Oil company is at 
present uuderreaming on No. 2 on which 
but little additional hole has been made 
during the past two weeks. 

Frampton Brothers have No. 5 for the 
Whittier Crude Oil company down 
nearly 1500 feet with 9 5-8 inch casing. 
No. 1, which is being deepened, is down 
nearly 1700 feet. 

Contractor Richard McConnellis mak- 
ing good progress with the well he is 
drilling for the Union Oil company on 
the Sausenina ranch. The hole is down 
over 600 feet and the formation is stand- 
ing up in excellent shape. 

No. 13 of the Home Oil company is cer- 
tainly proving the superstition attached 
to that unlucky number. When drilling 
was first begun on the hole, it went 
down rapidly enough, but since striking 
a conglomerate formation progress has 
been nrade backward. The casing was 
pulled some weeks ago since when the 
original hole has never been recovered. 
No. 10, which is being deepened, is go- 
ing down slowly but surely, and has 
already reached a depth of over i7oofeet. 

MARIN. 

The well of the Bolinas Bay Oil com- 
pany is now down nearly 2000 feet. Con- 
siderable oil is coming in. The drill is 
working in a dark shale. The size of 
the hole is 5$. 

SANTA CLARA. 

Work at the Gilroy Oil company's well 
was temporarily suspended for a few days 
on account of an accident. At a depth 
of 65 feet hard while shale was en- 
countered, and the cable snapped, leav- 
ing the drill at the bottom of the hole. 

SANTA CRUZ. 
The Orchard Crude Oil company, 
operating six miles west of San Jose on 
the Los Gatos road, was organized five 
weeks ago. On Monday of last week it 
commenced drilling, and is now down 
over 200 'feet. Seepages of oil were 
found at 60 and 80 feet. 

SAN BENITO. 
The Watsonville Oil company is going 
to put down one or more trial wells at a 
point on the Sargent ranch where oil 
sand appears at the surface, and where a 
shallow well is flowing oil. This shallow 
well is down 160 feet, and was abandoned 
because of difficulty in going through a 
deposit of asphalt. The company has a 
process to overcome it. and it is expected 
that a good flow of oil will be obtained. 

SANTA BARBARA. 
Gas was struck the latter part of last 
week in the oil well being drilled by Mr. 
Churchill, near Carpenteria. 

The Casmalia R. O. and D. company, 
operating on the Tognizini rancho, is 
down with 11^ casing about 700 feet in 
favorable formation, the blue shale carry- 
ing considerable seepage and a good deal 
of gas. The work will be continued 
with 7% casing. It has been reported 
that a Kansas City syndicate has offered 
the company a 16 per cent royalty for a 
portion of its territory. Several Los 
Angeles parties were also in the field last 
week attempting to sub-lease from the 
company. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



TEH ' 

■ r ii ia\ > a. 
ingv. 
hard ' 

working for o\cr a neck \o apparently 
heavy atraliioi of -"ft MS I 
considerable oil u( high grade and ac- 
companied by a he«v> pressure of |U 
was encountered. This has been . 
the tlrillmen much trouble owing to the 
gas pre«ure, and it was found ne. 
to send to the Kay foe a Morahan sand 
pump to handle it. The well In 
day was 1975 feet deep. 

VP.NTtKA. 
The Skookam Oil a)m)«ny in Pole 
:th of Fillmore, li.ive sus- 
pended vmt* fir the present. 

The Bardsdalc compaoj 

having drilled their Brat well lo a depth 
ibandoned it on account 
of water in the hole are now moving the 
well rig and will attest llii- territory 1>\ 
drilling another Ii 

Hardsdnle Oil company, Bow <1 rilling 
than ioo> feci, with ii 
■bowing of oil and six good wells 
on the pomp. Nos. 1 and 2 on the I. cm 
mon place having been abandoned on 
account of tools lieinj; lost in the holes 
the company is now building a rig about 
sixty feet from the site of the first 
well. Prilling will commence at once. 
Mr. K. V. McDonald is the contractor 
for well No. J. 



GONE BACK TO COAL. 



Shortage of Cars Compels the 
Iron Works to Burn Coal. 

As an instance what hardships 
the Southern Pacific is inflicting 
on oil consumers individually and 
on the oil industry as a whole it 
is only necessary to cite the case 
of the Union Works. 

While the management of this 
vast concern was persuaded that 
it would be advantageous to use 
oil instead of coal for fuel they 
hesitated for a long time to rnpke 
the change for fear the supply 
would not be sufficient to meet 
the demands. 

When the oil fields of Coalinga 
and Kern were developed so as to 
insure an abundant supply of fuel 
the L nion Iron Works made a 
contract with the Monte Cristo 
company by which they agreed to 
take a large amount of oil, cover- 
ing a long period of time. 

The oil is used under six large 
boilers, and nearly a car and a 
half is consumed daily. 

For a while all went v^ell. The 
oil burned well, a great saving in 
the cost of fuel was effected, and 
the labor bill for handling fuel 
was lessened. The contract pro- 
vided that the Union Iron Works 
buy the oil at Bakersfield and do 
its own transportation, and as the 
demand for oil increased all over 
the state, the Union Iron Works 
began to have trouble to get cars. 
At last it became impossible to 
supply the necessary fuel for the 
furnaces, and one after another 
the oil burners were taken out 
and coal took the place of oil. 

At present ont.y one furnace 

IS BURNING OIL WHERE TF1ERK 
SHOULD HE SIX. 

The Monte Cristo has the oil, 
but the Southern Pacific company 
has not got the tank cars. 

Over half a dozen of the largest 



consumers in San Francisco have 
gone back t becaus'. 

did not pt. 
cou 1.1 not get it. 

The Standard Oil Compnm 

irs, and makes the rail- 
road haul them. It seems lo be 
the only concern that is able to 
tnpplj oil as wanted. 

If the railroad company dot 
intend to materially injure the oil 
industry it had better hurry back 
to California the tank cars it re- 
cently «ent lo Texas, or else get 
more here from the east. 

A YANKEE SCHEME. 

P. C. Ilicioo- Solves the Problem 
of Pumping Asphalt. 

A year or more ago a valuable 
stratum of liquid asphalt was dis- 
covered by oil opetators at work 
on the P. C. 1 litems ranch at 
Carpenteria. At forty feet a quan- 
tity of the stuff was found. At 
ninety feet a lake of it was 
reached, and tht stratum was 
never passed by the drill. 

The asphalt taken out was of 
a soft, mushy kind; a veritable 
nuish. It was filthy looking stuff, 
and a dittier place than the vicin- 
ity of thedrilling rig never existed. 

But it was found impossible to 
pump the stuff. It was worth lots 
of money, as it was pure asphalt, 
but being beyond the reach of 
ordinary pumping inventions, 
there was nothing to do but to 
give up and wait for the problem 
to be solved. 

Mr. Higgins, however, has been 
experimenting with the asphalt, 
and has a plan for its production, 
of which an Oakland man named 
John R. Scuphum will make a 
trial. The land is under lease to 
Mr. Ayres, who has done a good 
bit of prospecting about Carpen- 
teria. Ke left yesterday to ga to 
San Francisco to sub-lease to Mr. 
Scuphum, who will commence 
work with all possible haste. 

Mr. Higgin's plan is to use hot 
water to soften the asphalt to a 
pumping consistency. A well of 
big diameter will be sunk. Then 
a pipe to carry water will be sent 
down. This filled with boiling 
water will return, the pipe being 
continuous, to the boiler. The 
asphalt will be pumped from 
alongside the descending stream 
of water. It is thought that the 
plan will be as successful as it is 
ingenious.— News. 



Pt>Oala««ava)' oil 1 change 



! Wed 

Al'i' 



i 

BAY CITY, 

BBAR FLAG 

?SOi 

CARIBOO 



Oil in Colorado. 

A Denver dispatch says: A flow 
of oil has been struck in a well at 
Debequea, Col., at a depth of 200 
feet. 



Pacific Coast Underwriliog Company. 

Incorporate companies; furnish 
everything complete. 

Sell interest-beariugGold Bonds. 

Underwrite stocks. 

Buy and sell Oil Lands. 

Handle all kinds of mining 
properties. 

Information furnished investors 
regarding Pacific Coast Corpora- 
tions. Address, 

Main Office, 507-8-9 Parrott Bldg., 
San Francisco, Cal. 






.17 50 

76 00 

\i POIN r« ONSOL1 DATED 

loo at r is 115 00 

POUR OIL. 



2009 ni 45. 

4.1 

loo :lt 41 



c.l INT, 

l1 32 

too at 31 

II AN FOR I). 

3 at 102 00 

BOMB OIL. 



00.1 05 

V 11 00 
4-' 00 



320 00 
31 00 



;■ 'i 



400 at 3 40 
ioo(B6o) 3 45. 



1360 00 

345 00 

INDEPENDENCE. 

5 tooo at 08 4080 00 

JUNCTION. 

5oo(Soo)at 24 12000 

200 at 26 52 00 

7"o at 25 175 00 

KERN. 

20o(Bio)at s 75 1 150 00 

200 at s 75 1 150 00 

LINDA VISTA. 

260 at 07 14 00 

LION. 

i5oo(S6o)at oS 12000 

450 > at 08 360 00 

1000 ( II60) al 09 90 ou 

1000 at 09 90 00 

MONTE CRISTO. 

200 at 1 75 350 00 

ioo(Bio)at 1 70 17000 

100 at 1 70 170 00 

MONARCH OF ARIZONA. 

300 at 22 66 00 

1200 at 2r 252 00 

OCCIDENTAL O. OF W. VA. 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON I1RAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Qrane co. 

H. T. LALLY, Manager 

33-25 FIRST ST. ) 

24 FREMONT ST. J 

San Francisco, Cal 



500 at 33 . 
200 at 30 . 



165 00 
60 00 



OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 



300 at 23 
350 at 24 . 



69 00 
84 00 



PEERLESS. 

2S(S5)at5i2K ' 128 125 

10 at s I2>£ 51 25 

20 at 5 25 105 00 

PETROLEUM CENTER. 



i50o(B6o)at 06. 

5000 (S90) 05. 

2500 at 06 . 

600 ( P.9o)at 06 

697 at 05. 



90 00 

250 o> 

150 00 

36 00 

34 S5 



REED CRUDE. 

1200 at 36 432 00 

2300 at 35 805 00 

STERLING. 

ioo(Bio)ati 22j£ 122 50 

400 at 1 22j£ 490 00 

10 at 1 20 12 00 

SENATOR. 

200 at 80 160 00 

THIRTY-THREE. 

50 at 8 25 412 50 

WEST SHORE. 
400 at 3 00 1200 00 



AMERICAN, 

STEEL AND WIRE til PY 



Pacific Works 

The only Wire Rope Factory on 
the Pacific Coast. 



Shares 85,724 Amount 117,761 27^ 



WANTED 

A good oil conip ny on proven ground. 
Will join with outfit and casing (near 
Hanford) of $2000 to $4000 on ground 
floor. Address, P. O. Box 117, Visalia, 
Cal. 



We make 

Wire Ropes, Cable and Hawsers 

For all purposes and with 

every possible combination 

of Wires, steel and iron, 

galvanized or plain. 

♦ 
□ 
□ 

D 

Wire Ropes s 
Of all Kinds I 
For Oil Well I 



©*£*? 



Purposes 



□ 

n 
□ 

□ 
□ 
D 



And all fixtures and appliances 
for the use of Wire Rope 



Send your orders to 

American Steel&Wire Co. 

LOS ANGELES— No. 206 North 

Los Angeles St. 
SAN FRANCISCO— No. 8 & 10 

Pine St. 



ii 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



ASTHMA CURE FREE 

Asthmalene Brings Instant Belief and Permanent 
Cure in All Cases 

SENT ABSOLUTELY FREE ON RECEIPT OF POSTAL 

WRITE YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS PLAINLY 



CHAINED 

FOR TEN 
YEARS 



There is nothing like Asthmalene. It 
brings instant relief even in the worst cases. 
It cures when all else fails. 

The REV. C. F. WEI^S of Villa Ridge, 111., says: 
"Your trial bottle of Asthmalene received in good 
condition. I cannot tell you how thankful I feel for 
the good derived from it I was a slave chained with 
putrid sor* throat and asthma for ten years. I 
despaired of ever being cured. I saw your adver- 
tisement for the cure of this dreadful and tormenting 
disease, Asthma, and thought you had overspoken 
yourselves, but reso'ved to give it a trial. To ray 
astonishment the trial acted like a charm. Seud me 
a full-size bottle." 

Rev. Dp. Morris Wechsler 

Rabbi ol Cong Bnai Israel. 
New York, Jan. 3, 1901. 
Drs. Taft Bros'. Medicine Co. 

Gentlemen: Your Asthmalene is an excellent 
remedy for Asthtna and Hay Fever, and its composi- 
tion alleviates all troubles which combine with 
Asthma. Its success is astonishing and wonderful. 
After having it carefully analyzed we can state thai 
Asthmalene contains no opium, morphine, chloro- 
form or ether. Very truly yours, 

REV. DR. MORRIS WECHSLER. 



Avon Springs, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1901. 
Dr. Taft Bros. Medicine Co. 

Gentlemen: I write this testimonial from a sense 
of duty, having tested the wonderful effect ol your 
Asthmalene (or the cure of Asthma. My wife has 
been afflicted with spasmodic asthma for the past 
twelve years. Having exhausted my own skill, as 
well as ma*jy others, I chanced to see your sign upon 
._ . your windows on 130th street, New York, and I at 
once obtained a bottle of Asthmalene. My wife commenced taking it about the 1st ol November. 
I very soon noticed a radical improvement. After using one bottle her Asthma has disappeared and 
she is entirely free from all symptoms. I feel that I can consistently recommend the medicine to all 
who are afflicted wfth this distressing disease. Yours respectfully, 

O. D. PHELPS, M. D. 

Dr. Taft Bros.' Medicine Co. Feb. 5, 1901. 

Gentlemen: I was troubled with Asthma for 22 years. I have tried numerous remedies, but they 
have all failed. I ran across your advertisement and started with a trial bottle. I found relief at 
once. I have since purchased your full-sized bottle, and I am ever grateful. I have a family of four 
children and for six years was unable to work. I am now in the best of health and am doing 
business every day. This testimony you can make such use of as ycu see fit. 

Home address, 235 Rivington street. S. RAPHAEL, 67 East 129th street. City. 

TRIAL BOTTLE SENT ABSOLUTELY FREE ON RECEIPT OF POSTAL 

addressing DR. TAFT BROS'. MEDICINE CO., 79 Bast 130th 



GAS FROM PETROLEUM. 




RELIEF. 



Do not delay. Write at once 
Street, New York City. 



BUY OR SELL 
CALIFORNIA 

OIL STOCKS 



THROUGH 



JOSEPH B.T0PLITZ 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange. 
Member California Petroleum Miners' Association. 

339 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Orders for Buying and Selling California Oil Stocks 
Promptly Attended to. 

Reliable information on Oil Stocks Furnished Gratis. 

Unlisted Stocks a specialty. 

Correspondence Solicited. 

Reference — California Safe Deposit & Trust Co., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



For Sale Cheap 
10,(100, or Less, Shares California Crude. 

Any Reasonable Offer Will Be Accepted 



Galveston to Use Oil in Making 
Water Gas 

The city of Galveston is about 
to utilize Beaumont oil in making 
water gas. All the necessary ma- 
chinery has been ordered and the 
buildings required are now in 
course of erection, says the Her- 
ald. 

It has been claimed that the 
Beaumont oil, in spite of its heavi- 
ness and the sulphur it contains, 
can be profitably refined, and that 
it will then make a good illuminat- 
ing oil. But chances are not be- 
ing taken in this direction. It is 
well known, however, that crude 
petroleum makes a fine water gas, 
and when mixed with coal gas it 
produces the best illuminating gas, 
known as the " blue flame." The 
manufacture of water gas from 
petroleum is not new and from 
statistics it is learned that 60 per 
cent of the gas used in the United 
States is what is known as water 
gas. • 

The preparation of water gas 
from oil is effected by distilling 
the oil first at a low temperature 
into a rich vapor, which, when 
passed into highly heated retorts, 
is converted into permanent gas 
of an illuminating power about 
five times greater than common 
gas. This gas made from oil is 
absolutely free from ammonia, 
sulphur compounds and carbonic 
acid. 

One of the great advantages 
that Texas oil will have over coal 
in the manufacture of gas is that 
with the use of coke gas can be 
made in six hours after lighting 
the coke. With coal it requires 
nearly six days to get the retorts 
in condition for manufacturing gas 
from coal. 

Just how much oil will be re- 
quired by the city of Galveston 
has not yet been figured out, but 
it is thought probable that the 
contract will be for 1,000,000 bar- 
rels, to be delivered as required. 

Thus a new venture for the 
utilization of crude petroleum is 
opened up, and the example thus 
set may be considered in this city 
and state, where some pessimistic 
producers are continually crying 
out about over-production. 



corded and published in the regu- 
lar reports of exchange transac- 
tions. Already the stocks of a 
large number of unlisted com- 
panies have been quoted on the 
exchange although, trading has 
not as yet assumed any import- 
ance. 

During the week past an aver- 
age amount of business has been 
done on the board and some slight 
variations in prices have naturally 
resulted. Reed Crude opened 
fairly strong at 34X to 35%: early 
in the week gradually falling back 
to 34 cents at the close on Satur- 
day. More of this stock was 
handled than any other one se- 
curity. Westlake made a trifling 
advance as did Fullerton oil, Brea 
Canyon, Alpha and Wilson. 

Only a sru 11 amount of business 
was done in mining stocks and the 
same may also be said of bank 
stocks and miscellaneous securi- 
ties. 



Los Angeles Stocks. 

The Los Angeles Stock Ex- 
change took an important step 
last week which will result in 
widening the scope of the insti- 
tution and which it is expected 
will tend to protect the stock buy- 
ing public somewhat . from the in- 
discriminate purchase of stocks at 
figures far in excess of their mar- 
ket value. At the last meeting of 
the governing board it was decided 
to have a call of unlisted securities 
at each daily meeting of the ex- 
change when the stocks of all oil 
and mining companies doing busi- 
ness in this state may be called 
up at the will of any broker and 
bids or offers on the same re- 



Indicted For Perjury. 

A Bakersfield dispatch on Mon- 
day states that E. A. Pueschel of 
Bakersfield, formerly receiver of 
the United States Land Office at 
Visalia, has been indicted by the 
Federal Grand Jury, now sitting 
at Fresno, for conspiracy in con- 
nection with the affidavits regard- 
ing the character of the land of 
the Kern River oil district. Fred- 
erick G. Maid, a Bakersfield 
printer and formerly in Pueschel's 
employ, has also been indicted for 
perjury on two separate counts. 
The bail in each instance has been 
fixed at $~ ,000. 

The Grand Jury at Los Angeles 
a year ago indicted both men on 
the same charges, but the indict- 
ments were subsequently quashed 
on the ground that the Grand Jury 
sitting at that point had no juris- 
diction. A reinvestigation by the 
Federal body at Fresno resulted ' 
in similar charges being brought. 
The warrants were served Satur- 
day evening. 



Strikes Oceans of Water. 

The well at Kramer is now 
down 960 feet, with the water ris- 
ing almost to the top of the well. 
They will complete their contract 
at 1000 feet, after which the 
Kramer Consolidated Oil company 
will take hold and sink it another 
1000 feet deeper if they don't strike 
oil sooner. — Randsburg Miner. 



Cars Scarce Again. 

Again there is a complaint, says 
the Californian, of a shortage of 
cars for Kern River traffic. There 
have been several similar protests 
during the past few months, but a 
few weeks ago cars became more 
numerous and shippers were hope- 
ful that the number would con- 
tinue sufficient to meet the de- 
mands of the trade. But the num- 
ber has grown beautifully less 
and as a result many of the pro- 
ducers are unable to fill standing 
orders. 



§ S3 






1 



w 






OIL OIL 



The secret of my success lies in the fact that I place my clients on proven property. 



JAMES R.T.MERSHON 



OIL OIL 



s 



1 S 

I ai 

Deal with responsible people it yon want to be protected. $£: 

"A word to the wise is sufficient." yj 

8P Success camps with success. >V< 

§8 S 

M '• Then follow success." ,V< 

£V5 Follow me ! ! ! m 

cyj With 14 prodnciug companies I've broken the record — 7 to 1. •»« 

es § 

j£> Where would you have been, had you followed me? .y, 

Wv 1 let others " wild-cat" aud " prospect." vX f 

jV^ I'll be their neighbor IF they strike oil. 3u 

CvQ Write for a FREE copy of my "Illustrated Oil Fields," which describes the origin >"' 

?M of oil in all its phases, where it is found, etc., etc. fiS 

S> References: San Francisco Banks. *^j 

tyi Authentic information furnished regarding any oil company in the State of California. -*£ 

j?u I have trustworthy data always available. -'• 

JW Correspondence welcomed. «_; 



(^WAVWWWVWlV^WWi »^3 



CM 



cJ/vmi^orc. 1 .iTlLilVOllUll 3g 



q MEMBKR SAN FRANCISCO OIL EXCHANGE ,hq 

S3 



§g Rooms 537=8-9 §j 

1 ^ 

S3 PARROTT BUILDING 43 

ol :»' 

53 43 



CM SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. & 

S£ 43 

1 ^ ^ '% 

B I 



M 



:m 

43 

CM 



& £ 



38 



14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



OIL DIRECTORY 



Leading Companies Now Operat- 
ing In California* 



i^lAUSTOGA OII^ AND DEVELOPMENT CO. 

500,000 shares par value $1. 
Operating on 2320 acres located In Napa, Yolo, 
Fresno, San Benito, Monterey and Kern counties. 
Officers: I, D Hitchcock, president; R B Todd, 
vice-president and manager; B F Edwards, 
secretary; J M Caselman, treasurer; Dr. H G 
Thomas and Dr. E J Boyes. San Francisco 
National Bank, depository. Office, 23 and 24 
Merchants Exchange, San Francisco, Cal. 



C 



1YGNET PETROLEUM CO. 



Capital $150,000 

50,000 shares at $3. 

Location — Fresno county. 

Directors— Chas. X, Fair, president, Blitz W Pax- 
ton, vice-president, Chas. A. Lee, treasurer, John 
C. McElroy, secretary. 

Office— 561 Parrott Building. 

Tel.— South 184. 

Z^IUYAMA VALLEY OIL COMPANY. 

Capital $1,000,000 

1,000,000 shares at $1.00. 

Location, 80 acres in 4, 9-25 in Santa Barbara 
County and 80 acres in 15, 10-24 in Kern County. 
Incorporated under the laws of South Dakota. 

Directors— W. -H. Turner. President; Robt. 
Johnson, Secretary and Treasurer; Andrew 
Christensen, Frederick Misch, L- M. Hickox; 
Depository, "Western National Bank. 

Pacific States Mining & Investment Company, 
fiscal agents. 

Office— 326 Post Street, San Francisco. 



D 



ABNEY OIL COMPANY. 



Incorporated. 
McKlttrick district. 16 completed wells; no 
acres proven ground. 
Office, 330 Pine St., Room 5, San Francisco, Cal. 



G 



R EAT NORTHERN OIL CO. OF OAKLAND 



Capital $250,000 

250,000 shares at $1 

125,000 shares of treasury stock. 

Location of property, Glenn County, Calif., 2,200 

acres, near Elk Creek, in Stoney Creek Mineral 

district. 

Officers, B F Arnold, President, Geo A Gray 
Secretary. 
Office, 476 Teuth street, Oakland, 



M 



ONTEREY OIL DEVELOPMENT CO. 



Capital $1,000,000 

1,000,000 shares at $1 each. 

Location of lands: Coalinga oil fields, Fresno 
county, 160 acres; Panoche oil fields, San Benito 
county, 160 acres; Monterey county oil belt, 4280 
acres. 

Officers: Dr J L Roberts, president; J B S Malt- 
ly, vice-president; J F Moore, secretary; D J 
Boughton. treasurer; Bank of Monterej , deposi- 
tory. Office at Monterey City, Cal. 



OCCIDENTAL OIL CO. 
OF WEST VIRGINIA. 

Capital stock 600,000 shares par value, $1.00. 

Officers: Wm. Crites, president: F. M Graham, 
vice-president; J. B. Batz, treasurer; C. E. Hail- 
tone, secretary; T. L, Moran, manager; Kem 
alley Bank, Cal. Depository. 
M. R. Goldberg, 483 Ninth street Oakland, Cal 



OBISPO OIL COMPANY. Capital, $1,000,000. 
Number of shares, 1,000,000. Treasury 
stock, 550,000 shares. All stock fully paid and 
non-assessable. Incorporated under the laws of 
California. Properties in Kern, Fresno, San 
Benito and San Luis Obispo counties, Cal. In- 
corporators: G R Parkinson, President Bank of 
Palo Alto; Captain Frank Barrett, Palo Alto, Cal.; 
K W Brown, Fresno, Cal.; Chas E Bond, Minne- 
apolis, Minn,; C F Alderson Chicago, III. Offi- 
cers: John F Giles, president; Frank Barrett, 
vice president; Chas E Bond, treasurer; C F 
Aldeison, secretary, K W Brown, assistant secre- 
tary. Office, Suite 74. Citizens Bank building, 
119-121 La Salle street, Chicago, 111. 



OCCIDENTAL OIL COMPANY 
OF WEST VIRGINIA. 
Capital stock, 600,000 shares.... par value, $1.00 
Officers— Wm. Crites, president; F M. Graham, 
vice-president; J. B. Batz, treasurer, C. E. Hail- 
stone, secretary; T. L- Moran, manager; Kern 
Valley Bank, Cal., depository. 

Mostellar & Allen, San Francisco Agents, 346 
Parrott Bldg. Telephone. Jessie 1683. 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY. Cap'tal stock, 
12.850,000; Par value, $1.00. Has 2,000 acres 
in Kern, Los Angeles and Summerland fields, 
with 27 producing wells. Officers and directors: 
P V Schermerhorn, president; C H Ritchie, vice- 
president; R D Robinson, secretary and treas- 
urer; D M Schermerhorn and W S Morton. Priu 
cipal office, Potomac building. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Tel. John 2281. 



SALINAS OIL AND DEVELOPMENT COM- 
PANY. Capital, $1,000,000. 1,000,000 shares 
at $1.00. Land in Monterey county. Officers and 
directors: President, W N McCarthy. San Fran- 
cisco; vice-president, J J Gunn, Independence; 
treasurer, Wm N McCarthy; secretary. J B Olsen, 
San Francisco; superintendent. Jno C Quinn; C A 
Burchom, J E Baker, N A Dorn, W J Ellis and S 
S Simon, attorney, Hon Eugene F Bert, San Fran 
cisco Office, room 573-574 Parrott building, San 
Francisco. 



S 



URETY OIL COMPANY 



Capital $600,000 

600,000 shares _par value $1.00 each. 

Location, 240 acres in section 20 and 29 T 3 N R 
16 W, S B M, Los Angeles County, Calif., Newhall 
district 

Officers and, Directors, M Esternaux. President, 
Geo, Greely King, Vice-President, T. H. Pearne, 
Secretary. D. A. Thieme, M. C. White. 

Farmers and Merchants Banks, depository. 

Office. 102 Henne Block. Los Angeles, Calif. 



STANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 

t'ap tal $300,000 

Treasury stock $150,000 

Location: 92 acres leased proven oil land in 
McKittrick; 80 acres owned iu Coalinga near 
Home Oil company. Fresno; 160 acres owned ad- 
joining oil well iu Napa valley. 

Officers: R A Falkeuberi>, president; R L Bis- 
by, vice-president; M J Henry, secretary; J G 
Steele, treasurer; F Cooke-Caldwell, attorney for 
company. 

Offices: 475-76 Parrott Building, 853 Market 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



SUPERIOR OIL COMPANY. 

Capital stock, 500,000 shares, par value $1 each 

5960 acres of lmd in the Sunset and McKittrick 
district. 

Two Standard rigs operating at present time. 

Officers and Directors — R S Aston, president; 
W Dixon, vice-president; J W Crosland, secretary 
and treasurer, Wm. M Landess, W W Kelly and 
W G Wallace. Attorney, C C Cowgill. Office, No. 
17 Galtes block. Bakersfield. Cal 



U. 



S. OIL AND MINING CO. 



Capital $300,000 

Par value, $1 per share. 

Location: 320 acres in Kern River District, 160 
acres in section 27, ir-24 Sunset district, near Blod- 
gett & Jewett wells, no acres on fraction 26, 12-24, 
near Monarch, adjoining Jewett, Blodgett & Beal 
gusher. L- M. Underwood, president, F Ketelhut 
seel tary. 

Office— an 19th street, Bakersfield, ICal, 






Oil Prospectuses 

Booklets, Stock Certificates, Letterheads, Envelopes, Dodgers, 
Letter Circulars, etc., 



i 
I 



5* Printed at short notice and at reasonable prices. ^ 

I Pacific Oil Reporter Job Office i 

i Rooms 31, 32 and 33 f 

I 318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

T 5 



WALDORF OIL AND ASPHALT COMPANY. 
Incorporated Feb 25, 1901. Capital, $500,000. 
500,000 shares at $i.oo per share. Place of busi- 
ness, Hanford, Cal. Headquajters at McCord & 
Son. Location of lands, 1.2, o, Guadalupe, Santa l , 
Barbara county, Cal. Officers and directors: Geo 
B McCord. president, Hanford; Dr N P Duncan, 
vice-president, Hanford; J O Hickman, treas^ 
urer, Hanford; Wm M Madden, attorney for com- 
pany, San Francisco; W H Worswick, field superi- 
ntendent. Hanford; F Brader, Hanford, N Weis- 
baum, Hanford, LS Chittenden, Hanford. W H 
Worswick, Jr, Hanford. Jas Manasse, secretary. 



b'^Pi^9i^9i^9i^rPiUr9i^r0i^rPi-k>9i^^ ,* 



CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS 



Mexico 



SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

SPECIAL TRAIN 
EXCURSION 

PERSONALLY CONDUCTED 

COMPOSITE CAR, DINING CAR 

VESTIBULED SLEEPERS 



RATK 



LEAVES 



$80 SAN FRANCISCO Dec. 18 
$70 LOS ANGELES Dec. 19 



Good sixty days. Optional side trips. 

Special rates from all California 

Points. 

Inquire of Agent for Literature- 



ARIZONA INCORPORATIONS 



We make a specialty of chartering Ari- 
zona Corporations. Arizona has the 
most liberal laws in the United States- 
no taxes to pay, stock made non-assess- 
able, no personal liability for corporate 
debts. 

We take stock for cur service, if you de- 
sire. We save you one-half the fees 
charged by others, and help you pro- 
mote )Our enterprise. We give you a 
certificate that you are duly incorpor- 
ated. All business attended to by an 
expert corporation lawyer. Correspond- 
ence solicited. 



THE WESTERN INVESTMENT CO 

Rooms 1 and 3, Porter Block 
PHOENIX - - ARIZONA 



For Lease 

Twenty acres of absolutely proven oil 
land in McKittrick district to lease on 
royalty basis for development work. 
Chance for good, responsible driller. 
Securities required. 

For further particulars, address, 

W. G. KERCKHOFF 

Wilcox Block, Los Angeles. 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wrench ^S^S 



bits in drilling stem boxes 




Dnlllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND "MONEY SAVED. 
It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits. 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. 



-MANUFACTURED BY- 



J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Oil Well Casing Oil Stills 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets. P. O. Box 231 

Telephone, Main 196. Baker Block. Station C 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 




Is 

i 

p 
II 
m 



m 

1 
i' 

i 
I 



Webster Iron Works 



DEPARTMENTS: 



MACHINE SHOPS 
BLACKSMITH SHOP 



FOUNDRY 
PATTERN SHOF 



m 

MINING, MILLING and MACHINE CASTINGS 



Rig Irons, Sand Reels, Sand Pumps, Drilling and Fishing 
Tools, Hea"y Forgings. 

Telephone 341 21st and I Streets. P 0. Box 463 

BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 







For prices, etc., inquire 



W. FORfilE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil & Gas Well Rig Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKKR, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San 
Francisco, Cal., Bakersfield, Cal. 



PACP1C OIL REPORTER 



Stock Guaranteed 

BY 

Gold Bond 

Bearing 3 per cent inter 
annum, payable semi-annually. 

Deposited as Security 

for full amount "f purchase 
pric». 



Limited amount of 

rocK 

offered at Ji.uo |>er share. 



Hollister 

Crude Oil Co., Ltd., 

308 Market Street 
San Francisco 

Responsible Brokers Wanted. 



AMERICAN TOOL WORKS A. s cooper, c. L, m e. 



VAVVWAVMVWAVVVAVA 



WONDERFUL SUCCESS 




Smith-Premier £ 
Typewriters * 

Are Used Everywhere 

READ TJJIS LIST: 

Heald's Business College use 30 
Southern Pacinc Co. system ..47 

Western Dnion TeL Co 36 

S. F. Public Schools now use. . .43 

S. F.Call " ■ -21 

Hale Bros " 14 

Viavi Co " .13 

Cogswell College ' 11 

Miller, Scott & Sloss . " . . 10 



Get information from us about 
the new SPEED Device. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

1 10 Montgomery St., S. F. 



Proprietor. 






Standard and Special Drilling Tools 



'219 Crocker Building 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SPRCtAl.TIKS 



All Sixes of Casing Spears Tor Rent. 

109=111 Mission Street, 



Bet. Spear and Main 



Telephone, Main 5578. 



Sod OIL TANKS 



1 # i™ 

— S? 

25 8 







42 feet diameter. 18 feet high. Capacity, 177,500 gallous. 



Atlas Pipe Wrench^C 

Received highest award at Pau-Americun Exposition, Buffal ;, N. Y., igoi. 



IT HAS w . 

NO EQUAL \«J 




NO THREADS 
TO STRIP 



Made in four sizes — io, 18, 24 and 36 inches. 

Atlas Tube Cleaner 

Received highest award at Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, N. Y., 1901, 



For Water=tube 
Boilers 




It Has No 
Equal 



Write for circulars. Ask jour supply man. 
Manufactured by 

ATLAS PIPE WRENCH CO. Flood l u "fe, 



New York Office, 121 Liberty Street 



San Francisco. 
Works, New Haven, Conn. 



□□nnnDDnnannrjonoauannnnDao 
a n 

g Before buying Oil Stock or g 
n leasing or buying Oil Lands a 
£ call on A. BARIEAU, Room 5 
g 23 Columbian Building, oi6g 
d Market Street, San Francisco c 

D a 

aaonnnDaooQrjrjnnnnrjnarjnnnDa 



Petroleum Oil, Asphaltum and 
kindred hydrocarbons 



A. ZELLERBACIi & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

4lf>, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San l*"rancisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to tl e trade. 



We carry the largest Mock. Our price* are 
Equitable. 

Tel. main. 1133. 



When you wan; to swear go to 

LEE D. CRAIG 

Notary Public and 
Commissioner of Deeds 



316 Montgomery St. 

bet. Califorria 

and Pine, San Francisco 



The Road to Wealth 

Headquarters School and Governmen 
Lands. 

Lands all counties in California. Mo conditions 
on School Lands as to residence or cultivation 

Only $1.25 an acre. Local. * in all Mineral Bell. 

—Kern River, McKittrick, Devil's Den, Mojave, 
Sunset, vjoalinga and other famous districts. The 
Cheapest, Safest and Surest Investment in Amer- 
ca. Send Stamp for Land Book. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, California. 

I0M00 Shares of Oil Stock 



DIVIDENDS. 

Dividend No. i was declared by the Ventura 
Consolidated Crude Oil Company .Nov. i^th. 
Regular dividends will be paid quanerly here- 
after. Company has 4 producing wells No. 5 
dulling; 2720 acres of oit land; also rich gold mine 
in Arizona. To continue rapid development 
work a block of treasury stock is being sold at 
20 cents per share, par value, $1.00. — Hull paid — 
Non-assessable. Reliable agent wanted. Ad- 
dress all orders for stock or further particulars to 

W. G. YOUNG & CO., 

Fiscal Agents. 
628-30 Laughlin Bldg., Los Angeles, C»l. 



The Star Drilling Machine 



The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machiu 
oroil and gas works. It is usually advisableto 

ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. . Its tes(s rarJge f rom shallow water wells to a Hurt of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 

recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

" One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoyine springs. They are simple. 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in even- State and Territory 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilliug and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. AKRON OHIO. 








Ajax 

Drilling 
Engine 



Standard Drilling and 
Fishing Torts 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST. 



GEORGE H. TAY COMPANY 

49 to 53 First Street, San Francisco 

WWVPWWV w WW WW WVWWP WWWWVW W WW VWWWWWWWW WW WWWWWP • WWWW* WVVWWVWWWWW9WWV 

Not Quantity of Land but Quality 

SILVER STAR OIL COMPANY 



Capital Stock 300,0Od Shares 



Par Value $1.00 per Share 



THE LAND OF THIS COMPANY comprises the SE quarter of the NW quarter of Section 28, Township 30 S., Range 23 E. This property is directly in line of pro- 
duction and within one-quarter of a mile of the famous Dabney wells, and land that cannot be purchased for less than {20,000 per acre, and only 1 mile from the S P. 
R. R. station at McKittnck. Immense deposits of asphaltum are found on this land, as well as numerous seepages of oil and live oil sand on the surface. There can 
scarcely be a doubt as to the enormous value of this land, but the drill alone will tell 
WORK HAS COMMENCED Well No. 1 is now almost completed and is in oil. 
FOR A SHORT TIME ONLY a limited quantity of stock in this company is offered at 25 CENTS PER SH A R E. Write for Prospectus to the 

Silver Star Oil Co., 607=608 Safe Deposit Building, San Francisco 

PLEA8H MENTION THE PACIFIC OIL RBPORTBR 




Parke & Lacy Co. 

SAX FRANCISCO, CAT;. ]5A K i:KSI- 1 i:i.l>, CAI.. 

21 and 23 FREMONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



OIL WELL DRILLING MACHINERY 

TOOLS AND SUPPLIES 

ENGINES, BOILERS, PUMPS, ETC. 

BOSTON CASING 

Prompt Delivery. Correspondence Solicited. 
A Rents for STAR Portable Drilling Machines 



I 



Gndorscd by the California Petroleum Miners' A««oclatlon. 




SeSSSSSSSWSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS^^ »SSSSS$«5S«SSS«S3SSSS!«SSSSK^^ 



The third edition of our little 
booklet has been received. You 
should write for one. 



We offer you 



Don't Yon Think 

a- good opportunity for investment ? Thousands 
have read our little booklet during the past 30 days 
and hundreds are placing their surplus cash with us 
because they have investigated and know we are 
safe, strong and progressive. They want to buy our 
stock at bedrock prices. DO YOU ? 



!S2SA£SSSS&3S&£3££3S£tfS£&££&C££tf£&£tf&< > ''''' 



ADDRESS 

Standard Consolidated 
Oil and Land Company 

ROOM 7, 532 MARKET STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

MEMBERS CALIFORNIA PETROLEUM MINERS' ASSOCIATION 



R - fe»| , &*)'&*i'fe*!i - fe*'fe*l'fe*>''a KU »! ti-»! fe*)-fer»S''S4*i'fe*'fer»»>;fe»S'fe*''Sr*S'fe-»S'fe»* 



$100 BUYS 

200 SHARES 
OIL STOCKS 

In Ai Oil Company; 200 barrel well. Stock sold in lots 
of $100 and up. Guaranteed against loss by 

Security Gold Bond 

Indorsed by a Trust Company of $1,000,000 paid up capi- 
tal. Cash returned at maturity of bond. Safe, legitimate. 
Investigate. Stock shares in all dividends and profits. 
Handsome illustrated booklets of oil fields, with official 
map, for 10 cents in stamps. 

ILLINOIS OIL BOND COMPANY 

Room 506, 167 Dearborn Street, Chicogo. 

Home Office, Room 7, first floor, Mills Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



I 

I 

I 

I 
% 
$ 

* 

I 



THE BEST CASING PULLER 

The Norton Ratchet Jack 



With Ring and'Slips for Pulling 
Casing. 



ALWAYS SAFE, READY AND EFFECTIVE 



This jack is self lubricating, pro- 
vided with ball bearings, giving 
maximum of efficiency with mini- 
mum of friction. No blocking re- 
quired, as the hold of the iing and 
slips is absolute. Convenient to 
operate, light and durable. For 
prices and particulars address 

M. G. WEST, 216 California Street, San Francisco. 




Bovaird & Seyfang Mfg Co. 



• MANUFACTURERS OF ■ 



Stationary and Portable Boilers, Steam Engines, 

Iron Tanks, Rig Iron Outfits, Drilling and Fish ng Tools, 

And everything needed to drill and operate 



Oil, Gas and Artesian Wells 

Manufacturers' Agents for Tubing, Casing, Pipe Fitlings, Valves, Etc. 

Natural Gas Plants a Specialty. 

Cable address, "Boang." ABC and Private Codes. 

BRADFORD, PA-, U- S- A. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 3. No. 4 



I RWCISCO. CAL.. FRIDAY NOVEMBER 29.1001. 



Prick, Ten Cents 



RANK NONSENSE. 



A Combine Circular Shows Evi- 
dence of Weakness. 



Apparently those engaged in 
boosting the combination of Kern 
oil producers feel obliged to use 
any arguments, good or bad, truth- 
ful or mendacious, in order to 
force reluctant producers into join- 
ing their association. 

The latest argument is in the 
form of a circular issued by the 
is. P. Brooks' companies to thrir 
stockholders. 

This circular states that in case 
the combine is a success, and con- 
trols the Kern output the Stand- 
ard Oil company will purchase 
15,000.000 barrels the first year at 
60 cents at the wells, and will in- 
crease the amount at the rate of 
1,000,000 barrels a year. 

In case the combine is not able 
to offer the Standard the entire 
output the Standard will buy 
where it can buy the cheapest and 
will keep the price down. 

This is the veriest rot, and is an 
instance of methods heretofore 
used by Mr. Brooks in the en- 
deavor to bring about the success 
of his plans. 

Some months ago he o-ganized 
another "combine," which, how- 
ever, failed to succeed. It was 
currently reported that because 
other companies refused to join in 
Mr. Brooks' combine, he threatened 
to and did commence lowering the 
price of oil, and was held by many 
to be mainly responsible for put- 
ting the price of Kern oil down to 
a figure which made a profitable 
production impossible. 

Now comes this circular to the 
effect that in case the combine is 
a success and controls all the out- 
put of the Kern River field the 
Standard will buy 15,000,000 bar- 
rels a year, and pay 60 cents a 
barrel for it. 

The Standard Oil company has 
made no such promises, and those 
who say it has, aud endeavor to 
use this as a means of compelling 
the producers to join the combine 
are bigger fools than they repre- 
sent the Standard to be. 

The combine proposition is no 
nearer a success today than it was 
months ago. This attempt of Mr. 
Brooks to bolster the scheme along 
has done it no good. 

It is stated another combine is 
being started, which will leave 
Mr. Brooks out, and which will 
aim to raise the price of oil with- 
out throwing away the properties 
of the small producers, and feather- 
ing the nests of a chosen few, 

Those who with Mr. Brooks are 
engineering the "combine" propo- 
sition will be interested in know- 
ing Mr. Brooks expressed an opin 
ton this week to a Los Angeles 
gentleman that he did not believe 



the combine could be organized 
successfully. 

The stockholders of his com- 
panies will also be interested in 
knowing that Mr. Brooks, in a re- 
cent conversation with one of the 
most influential oil men on the 
coast, referred to them as "pig- 
headed " 

They are not fools, but are just 
"pig-headed" enough to do just 
the opposite from what Mr. Brooks 
desires. 

It is now up to Mr. Brooks to 
state when and by whom and to 
whom the Standard Oit company 
promised to buy 15,000,000 bar- 
rels of Kern oil yearly at 60 cents. 



INJURED BY AGENTS. 



How Reliable Companies and 

Firms Suffer From Unreliable 

Agents. 



The followingletterwas received 
recently from J. W. Heisner, alarge 
dealer in oil and mining stocks, 
and who is located in the Parrott 
building. 

San Francisco. Cal., Oct. 15, iqoi. 
W. B. Winn. Esq., Editor aud Proprietor of the 
Pacifif On. Reporter, 318 Pine St., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

I desire to call your attention to an article 
which appeared in your vnlued paper, issue of 
September 27. 1901, in which one of your sub. 
scribers enquired regarding me and complained 
of one P.. E. Vernon wbo is reported to have sold 
some $5000 worth of stock forme in Hertford. 
N. C and as I feel that you through your paper 
have no desire to do anyone an injustice, I kindly 
ask you to investigate my standing, also the 
properties which lam identified with, which are 
the Bankers and Brokers Oil company, and the 
Grass Valley Consolidated Gold Mining company. 
As to my standing as a business man, I refer 
you to Merchants' National Bank at Portland, 
Oregon, the Western National Bank of San Fran- 
cisco, and after investigating, I would deem it a 
favor if you w^uld publish me and the companies 
above mentioned as you find them. Respectfully, 
J. W. Heisner. 

This paper hasmade a thorough 
investigation of this matter and 
finds facts as follows: 

It seems that some months ago 
Mr. Heisner authorized a man 
named Vernon, to sell in the east 
some treasury stock in an oil com- 
pany. Vernon was smart, of good 
address and a hustler. He was 
well recommended. 

He sold a large quantity of 
treasury stock and remitted most 
of the money. He also sold a lot 
of promoter's stock and pocketed 
the money, the company's treasury 
not being enriched thereby. 

He made a lot of money, could 
not staud prosperity, looked too 
often into the bottom of the gl»ss, 
dropped from sight, and for a long 
time was missing. 

Mr. Heisner made good to the 
company whatever losses it in- 
curred through his agent Vernon, 
and should not be blamed for the 
weaknesses and misrepresenta- 
tions of his employees. His case 
is one only of many where honest 
men and'reliableoil companies have 
been injured by the actions of 
agents believed to have been 
honest, but who used most ques- 
tionable methods in order to sell 



oil stocks, and who often when the 
stock was sold failed to remit. 

Personally Mr. Heisner bears an 
excellent reputation, and his busi- 
ness associations are of the best. 

The Bankers and Brokers Oil 
company which Mr. Heisner repre- 
sents, is a reliable concern, and in- 
cludes in its holdings some of the 
best oil-producing territory in t In- 
state. It has a fine well on its Sun- 
set property adjoining the Mon- 
arch, and has already erected large 
tankage facilities. The company 
will be able to supply 2000 barrels 
a day if necessary of good quality 
oil. 

The company owns 1000 acres 
in San Benito county, holds a lease 
on 80 acres in Kern River district, 
and a lease on 40 acres in Sunset 
in 23, 3223. 

Mr. Heisner was one of the 
Directors of the Syndicate Petro- 
leum company, and though he had 
nothing to do with the manage- 
ment was ready to contribute his 
portion to the treasury to complete 
wells and make a success of the 
enterprise. He was the financial 
agent of the company and it was 
through one of his eastern agents, 
Vernon, that this and other stock 
was sold, principally in North 
Carolina. 

Mr. Vernon also sold a few hun- 
dred shares of Mountain View 
Gold Mining company's stock for 
Mr. Heisner, and his company is 
one of the best managed in Sump- 
ter District, Eastern Oregon, with 
ample capital in the treasury to 
expend $15,000 each year for the 
next two years in development 
work. The company has opened 
up very large bodies of pay ore 
on its property. This company 
was promoted by Mr. Heisner and 
has proven a complete success and 
the investors have valuable hold- 
ings. 

Personally Mr. Heisner has high 
standing in business circles, and 
would not condescend to use 
methods of falsehood or misrepre- 
sentation in order to sell stock. 
Neither will he handle the stock 
of any company that will not 
stand the closest investigation. 

RAILROADS VS. OIL. 



How They Are Injuring the Oil 
Industry, 

In commenting on the news 
published exclusively last week in 
the Pacific Oil Reporter con- 
cerning the inability of the rail- 
roads to transport oil from the 
fields to San Francisco, the Los- 
Angeles Herald says: 

1 here is a belief very generally 
held that amounts to an absolute 
moral certainty that the State of 
California alone can more than 
consume present output of the 
oil fields. That is viewing the oil 
situation in a broad and generous 
way. But notwithstanding this I 



fact there is a surplus in several 
if not all of the oil fields of the 
State, that has occasioned such 
congestion as to force prices down- 
ward until the Kern river combine 
organized for the purpose of 
attempting to deal with the situa- 
tion from a business standpoint. 

Many reasons have been ad- 
duced for the depreciation In the 
price of oil and in all there may 
have been mayhap a certain grain 
of truth, but that the question of 
transportation has been and is the 
vital one to the oil producer has 
never been more strikingly illus- 
trated than in the present situation 
in San Francisco. Three years 
ago the consumption of oil for fuel 
amounted to only about 1000 bar- 
rels a year, and in the interval the 
consumption sprang to 1,000,000 
barrels. That is a splendid show- 
ing on its face. But now it is 
learned that the Union Iron Works 
has reverted to the use of coal. 
The management is aware of the 
advantages that oil has over coal, 
and when satisfiedthat the supply 
for their furnaces could be main- 
tained entered into a contract with 
the Monte Cristo company by 
which the latter contracted for the 
oil required, the Union Iron 
Works undertaking to do their 
own transportation. As time went 
on it was found that the Southern 
Pacific company could not furnish 
tank cars, and one by one the oil 
furnaces have had to be closed 
down until now there is only one 
furnace burning using oil instead 
of six. With these six furnaces 
using oil, a car and a half of the 
fuel per day was consumed, but 
the cars could not be obtained and 
coal has again the right of way at 
the Union Works. 

Nor is this all. The Union Iron 
Works is a large and powerful 
corporation, and it is scarcely to 
be supposed that what it failed to 
accomplish other smaller concerns 
succeeded in doing. As a matter 
of fact a number of the largest 
consumers of fuel oil in San Fran- 
cisco have been compelled to re- 
vert to coal on account of the in- 
ability of the Southern Pacific 
company to furnish transportation. 
This lack is what has retarded the 
development of the oil industry 
from the first, and despite the 
continuous cry that has gone up 
from the producers in all of the oil 
field the company has never taken 
steps to transport regularly and 
continuously the oil awaiting de- 
livery. The Standard Oil Com- 
pany has its own cars and the rail- 
road has hauled them all right, with 
the result that the Standard has 
always been in a position to domi- 
nate the situation. The lack of 
transportation facilities has been 
so prolonged as to give rise to the 
suspicion that it has not altogether 
been without ulterior motive. 



PACIFIC OIL KKPORTKK. 



Standard Rock Oil Company 



(INCORPORATED UNDER THE LAWS OF ARIZONA) 



Proven Oil Lands in McKittrick, Coalinga and Napa County, and Asphaltum lands in Santa Clara County. Stock Non-Atsessable. 

300,000 shares, par value $1 per share. 475-476 Parrott Building. 



ASPHALTUM REFINERY BULLETIN NO. 2. 



To the Stockholders of the Standard Rock Oil Compauy— Greeting. 



San Francisco, Cai. , Nov. 29, 1901, 



We, the officers and directors of 
the Standard Rock Oil Company, 
47576 Parrott Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., have informed you in 
our Bulletin No. 1 of Nov. 8th of 
our recent acquisition of 6000 acres 
of exceedingly rich asphaltum 
lands, located near Gilroy in Santa 
Clara County, Cal. 

These lands are known as the 
best and richest asphaltum deposits 
in the state of California. As an 
actual fact there are hundreds of 
thousands tons of fine brea in 
sight, which contain from 40 to 90 
per cent pure asphaltum. In an 
effort to reach oil in theseimmense 
tar-beds some years ago, one com- 
pany sunk an oil-well 120 feet; 
but could not proceed at this depth 
as the drill became too sticky and 
it was impossible to drive the cas- 
ing down straight on account of 
the solid mass of partially liquid 
asphaltum the driller had to con- 
tend with. In another well which 
was driven down over 450 feet, all 
the way through liquid asphaltum, 
in 1879, the well-known oil opera- 
tor, Mr. McPherson was not any 
more successful in finding light 
oil although he at least succeeded 
in pumping 400 barrels of this 
liquid tar with the hope of goiDg 
through it and being able to find 
oil. A vain quest, nothing but 
liquid asphaltum! 

These deposits crop out in 
several dozen places, each cover- 
ing hundreds of acres. If worked 
day and night for 50 years on a 
very large scale, these immense 
strata of asphaltum could not be 
exhausted. It is a highly gratify- 
ing fact that our president has 
succeeded to acquire these lands 
for the company, who will now be 
in the position to redeem the 
promises made in good faith by 
the Standard Rock Oil Company 
when you bought stock some time 
ago. 

The Standard Rock has been 
known everywhere among news- 



papers, oil journals and oil brokers 
as "the reliable and strictly legiti- 
mate," and that for good and 
sufficient reasons. Originally we 
have made our promises in the 
hope of striking oil in large quan- 
tities on our proven lands, but un- 
fortunately a short time after the 
Standard Rock Oil Company was 
incorporated, on April 23, 1901, the 
price of oil went down from $1 to 
15 cents per barrel. With such 
a low price for oil the direc- 
tors of this company considered it 
unwise to expend the treasury 
funds iu sinking oil wells, as the 
paying of dividends was entirely 
precluded. This fortunate acq uisi 
tion of 6,ooo acres of rich asphal- 
tum deposits has made our stock 
suddenly valuable. 

We have called especial atten- 
tion in our first bulletin to the 
fact that the price of our stock 
would be raised to 50 cents per 
share as soon as the buildings 
were erected, in order to give our 
old friends timely warning to pro- 
vide themselves with all the stock 
they can easily carry, at the old 
price. 

After date, of Nov. 29, 1901 no 
stock shall be sold at less than 50 
cents per share and this very low 
figure, we can assure you, will 
only be maintained for a very 
brief time. All the houses are 
erected now on the asphaltum 
lands, the refining kettles are 
actually on the ground and the 
foundations for the refining works 
are now being laid in brickwork. 
The necessary sheds and covers 
will be at once erected as soon as 
the large refining kettles are in 
place. We feel pleased to inform 
our stockholders that we have 
paid all our bills up to date as is 
our custom and that ample means 
are on hand in our treasury in or- 
der to meet all bills for current 
expenses, and that the woik of 
extracting and refining the as- 
phaltum will be pushed with all 



force and energy at our command. 
Within a few weeks we shall 
work in full blast with day and 
night shifts in order to fill all our 
contracts. Even during the con- 
struction of the refinery works we 
are taking out asphaltum in order 
to have a large quantity on hand, 
ready for refining. 

There is an unlimited demand 
for refined asphaltum at from $19 
to $25 a ton and we have many 
inquiries for the article at $20 a 
ton, while the total expense of ex- 
tracting and refining it, delivered 
at San Francisco, for the company 
is but $10.75 a ton, thus leaving 
us the handsome net profit cf 
$9.25 a ton. 

As soon as the refining works 
are completed stock will go to $1, 
its par value, at once. On the 
payment of dividends the stock 
will be entirely withdrawn from 
the market, as the remaining 
treasury stock benefits every 
stockholder pro rata. Our stock 
is absolutely non assessable. 

In our next bulletin we shall 
give a full report of analysis made 
by eminent chemists in order to 
discover any possible presence of 
tar-oils or other valuable by-prod- 
ucts which often raise the price of 
brea to $150 and $200 per ton. 

Our crude and refined asphaltum 
is considered by all who have 
used it superior to anything on 
the market, not excepting the 
famous Trinidad article for which 
New York pays today $35 per 
ton, while we can deliver it at 
New York port for $28 per ton 
and still net a profit of over $9 
per ton. 

We also own 80 acres of proven 
oil lands in Coalinga District with- 
in two miles N. W. in the same oil 
belt of the famous Home Oil Co.'s 
large wells and we own 160 acres 
adjoining the Calistoga Oil De- 
velopment Co.'s well in Napa 
county and have a lease of 52 acres 
of absolutely proven oil lands in 



McKittrick District and we expect 
to develop all these pr perties 
when the proper time comes, and 
next year you may expect addi- 
tional dividends therefrom. Mean- 
while we look to the asphaltum 
for the enhanced value of our 
stock. The output with our 
present capacity will be but eight 
tons per day ?nd will be increased 
to 16 tons per day of refined 
asphaltum within 90 days Even 
eight tons per will give the com- 
pany $74 per day or $26,640 per 
year net profits or nearly 9 per 
per cent on the entire capitaliza- 
tion of 300,000 shares at $1 par 
value or nearly 45 per cent on 
shares bought for 20 cents or 18 
per cent on shares bought at 50 
cents all these figures will be 
doubled in a few months. 

Our company does not owe a 
single dollar to anyone and was 
fortunate enough tosuvrive the oil 
panic of the past four long months, 
through honest and businesslike 
management of the directors of 
the company. 

This is an absolutely safe and 
giltedged investment, not a specu- 
lation by any means and the busi- 
nessman of sagacity who can fore- 
see the grand future of this vast 
and stable undertaking, will read 
this bulletin again and again and 
find that all we have said is en- 
tirely true without the slightest 
exaggerations and merely an 
honest businesslike statement of 
facts which stand the most rigid 
investigation. This sedate, con- 
servative man will purchase our 
stock at $1, its par value in circa 
four months from date with eager- 
ness while the more daring, 
smaller, yet very astute wage- 
earner will buy it now at fifty 
cents and just earn double the 
amount in dividends for the same 
number of shares. 

Ever glad to give responsible 
information, omitting other com- 
panies' glowing and false promises 
We remain, very respectfully and 
faithfully, 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Standard Rock Oil and Asphaltum Refining Company. Business Hours, 10 to 12. 2 to 5. 

855 Market street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Offices: 475-476 Parrott Building, 



PACIFIC OIL RRPORTiiK. 



OIL FOR LOCOMOTIVES. 



Southwestern Railroads All Uo- 
ln£ the New Fuel 

Inquiries made into the ques- 
tion of the use of fuel by the Kail- 
road Gazette, of New York, show- 
that a number of roads in the 
Southwest~are seriously consider- 
ing the use of Texas oil for loco- 
motive fuel, while a few roads 
now have some oil-burning loco- 
motives in service. 

The Kansas City Southern has 
two locom tives equipped for oil, 
but these have only been in use 
a few weeks, and not much is 
known yet about their perform- 
ance. However, they are said to 
steam well. 

The International & Great 
Northern has been experimenting 
■with fuel in locomotives, and oil- 
burning passenger, freight and 
switching engines are now in ser- 
vice and giving good results. It 
is thought that in the near future 
all enginesonthe Gulf Division of 
this road will be equipped for 
burning oil. Mr. F. Hufsnntli, 
the superintendent of motive 
power, says that at present prices 
there is a saving of about 20 per 
cent in favor of fuel oil and roads 
running' directly into the oil fields 
make a still larger saving, having 
no freight to pay on the oil. His 
opinion is that fuel oil will be uni- 



versally used by the mads in that 
lection of the country if pn 
conditions prevail. Mr. Hufsmith 
considers the following the chief 
advantages of oil over coal-burn- 
ing engines: There is do danger 
of setting out lues along the right- 
of-way and no need to clean fires 
at terminals; there are no cinders 
to be handled and the annoyance 
to passengers from cinders and 
smoke from the locomotive is over- 
come. 

The Gulf. Colorado & Saol 

I has fifteen engines convened from 
coil to oil-burning engines and 
expects to o nvert seventy-five 
engines as goon as possible, This 
road apparently has its plans more 
definitely made than the other 
I\xas lines. The economy in us- 
ing oil instead of coal is found to 
range from 25 to 40 per cent, the 
latter figure being obtained near 
the oilfields where the price of 
coal has been high. The former 
figure applies near the source of 
the road's coal supply. 

The Southern Pacific expects to 
equip for oil-burning the loco- 
motives on its Louisiana lines and 
on its lines in Easttrii Texas. The 
apparatus will be similar to that 
now used on Southern Pacific 
locomotives distributed between 
Oakland, Cal., and hi Paso, Texas. 
With reference to the Pacific Sys- 
tem, which has used fuel oil for a 
number of years, Mr. H. J. Small 



Bays that 149 locomotives are 
equipped to burn oil. 

The Mexican Central has made 

drawings for oil burning apparatus 

suitable for its locomotives, but as 

yet nothing has been done in the 

"f changing Its engines, 

Besides these about a dozen 
small roads in Texas say that oil 
fuel will probably be used on 
their locomotives, if the roads now 
experimenting with the Texas oil 
are successful. 

IMMENSE FLOW OF GAS. 



s will t-c test the 

pressure of the . 

Mr. Berry, who has had a • 
experience in oil and gas regions 

:t is the biggest gas well in 
the state. He never saw 
thing like it and he Is satisfied 
that the well contains sufficient 
gas to supply half a dozen cl 
the size of Watsonville with gas 
for fuel aud illuminating purj 

Frank Galley, the secretary of 
the company, says work will be- 
gin on another well in the vicinity 
of the g is well in a short time. 



The Casing of the WatHonvlltc 
Coast Co.'s Well Perforated. 

The Watsonville Coast Oil com- 
pany' well in the Gaffey district 
in which was struck a few weeks 
ago a flow of gas that resisted all 
efforts to control it, is a puzzle to 
the drillers. The Watsonville 
Register says that last week the 
casing was perforated, and the re- 
sult was surprising. There was a 
roar and a rush and in an instant 
an immense column of sand and 
water shot up into the air and 
broke over the top of the derrick, 
deluging the place with slush and 
driving the driller, Mr. Berry, and 
his crew into the open air. 

The fires under the engine were 
extinguished, and further opera- 
tions in the matter of drilling were 
entirely out of the question. The 
well will be capped and arrange- 



Beaumont Progress. 

Commenting upon the list of 
Beaumont gushers reaching the 
100 mark a Beaumont oil man who 
has visited the European fields 
says that more had been done in 
Beaumont in the space of ten 
months than would have been 

1 accomplished in Europe in five 
years. In Russia they have 
drilled but 2,oco wells in the space 
of thirty years. In addition to 
the 100 Spindletop gushers there 

', have been about thirty-eight 
wells drilled on the outside and 
will possibly be that many more 

i completed by the roth of January. 
One of the most remarkable feat- 
ures of this development is that a 
greater part of the drilling has 
been done by men totally un- 
familiar with the business. The 
same might be said of a great 
many of the contractors. 



^^•^•^•^•^•^.^^•^•^a^.**^^ 

$ 



36 



KERR'S REPORTS 

The Only Systematized Oil Rating and Reporting Agency in tbe World. 



WE HAVE 



Field Investigators, 
Credit Examiners, 
Abstract Searchers, 



IN WESTERN AND SOUTHERN OIL FIELDS., 



interest or official connection with 



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We have no 
oil companies. 

" WE ALWAYS KNOW." 

FEES AND CHARGES: A simple, general char- 
acter report, $2.00; details cost more. Our Monthly 
Investment tables with key giving estimates on oil 
companies, West and South, $25.00 for six months, 
under certain conditions free; 3,000 companies listed. 
Send address and claims of the oil company inquired 
for. 

We make credit examinations the same as the 
mercantile agencies. We find tbe cash values, esti- 
mate land values and oil property and assets. Our 
abstract searchers are the best known and most com- 
petent firms in California and Texas. 

Our field investigators are men who make maps, 
men who drill wells and men hired by this office who 
actually investigate. 

We tell you how to buy. We tell you when to buy. 



Some California oil companies pay killing royal- 
ties or have illegal leases, perhaps a tenderfoot 
management, or they may be honest and well- 
intentioned but fail for want of capital or experience. 
Some assessment companies may have a directory 
that will bleed you out of your rights. We know 
of some companies with the most plausible and 
alluring literature that are unworthy of confi- 
dence. There are companies that have the land, 
development money, the best of intentions but a 
" tenderfoot " management. Do you know whether 
you are in a spurious or a competent company? 
Kerr's Reports tell. 

We give authentic field maps constantly corrected 
and brought down to date by competent field men. 
We sell commercial information on oil progress, pro- 
duction, charters, by-laws, prices, etc., at one-tenth 
of what it would cost you to investigate. We give 
the legal history of a company, if stock is assessable, 
the validity of leases, the amount of royalties, the 
conditions of transportation, prices and competition. 

We tell you where to buy. We tell you when to sell. 



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We keep the investor constantly posted on the progress of his deal. SEND FOR PROSPECTUS. 



KERR'S REPORTS 

Mills Building, San Francisco, 



Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

endorsed By the California Petroleum 
Miners' Association. 



W B. WINN. Editor and Publisher 

Office and Editorial Rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



Telephone, Bush, 176 

TERMS 

One Year $25° 

Six Months 15° 

Three Months 1 00 

Single Copies 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Re- 
porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco, rooms 
3i-33r*33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 



Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal 
as second-class matter. 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1901, 



So far as prevailing conditions are 
con c e rned it 
Deplorable makes little differ- 
Results of ence what are the 
Shortage of railroad freight 
Tank Cars, rates on oil from 
Bakersfield to 
San Francisco. If the railroad 
should lower its rates to even 
twenty cents a barrel, and should 
then refuse or be unable to furnish 
tank cars the producer would be 
as badly off as he is today. 

At Coalinga the shortage of cars 
averages one hundred a week. At 
Bakersfield the average is even 
greater.- 

The only company that seems to 
beabletoobtain all the cars it needs 
is the Standard Oil Company, 
which has a large number of cars 
in reserve on a siding near Bakers- 
field. These cars have been in 
use by the Southern Pacific com- 
pany which suddenly discovered 
it would have no further use for 
them and they were returned to 
the Standard. 

As a result of this shortage of 
cars, and of the inability of the 
Southern Pacific company to trans- 
port the needed amount of oil 
from the oil fields to this city, 
several of the largest local con- 
sumers of oil have been obliged to 
return to the use of coal for fuel, 
and will not again make the change 
from coal-burning to oil-burning 
furnaces. Among these con- 
sumers are the Union Iron Works 
which were using oil under six of 
their largest furnaces, requiring a 
consumption of a car and a half of 
oil daily. The Union Iron Works 
were buying their oil under con- 
tract at the wells, and were trans- 
porting it themselves. The ex- 
periment of burning oil was suc- 
cessful both from a view of con- 
venience and cleanliness as well 



as from a standpoint of economy. 
But the railroad could not furnish 
the Union Iron Works enough 
cars to enable them to keep a sup- 
ply of oil in their tanks. 

Last week five of the six oil- 
burning furnaces were re-changed 
to coal-burning, and will not prob- 
ably be re-changed for the use of 
oil. 

Within the last two weeks 
several other large San Francisco 
consumers have been unable to 
obtain the necessary oil, on ac- 
count of lack of cars, have pulled 
out their oil-burners, and gone 
back to the use of coal, not be- 
cause they wanted to, but because 
the policy of the railroad compelled 
them to. Among these consumers 
was the largest laundry in the 
state, where a carload and more of 
oil was consumed daily. 

Until this week one of the most 
important steamship lines on the 
coast was preparing to use oil in- 
stead of coal, and in fact had made 
all necessary arrangements so to 
do. The scarcity of oil, and the 
consequent serious delay and in- 
jury inflicted on several large city 
consumers has forced the steam 
ship company to postpone action 
as regards using it for fuel. 

A number of instances could be 
quoted showing what a great in- 
jury the present shortage of cars 
is working on the oil industry. 

This is particularly provoking 
when a mile or more of empty 
tank cars belonging to the Stan- 
dard Oil Company have been lying 
idle at Bakersfield. 

The railroad commissioners are 
wasting a lot of time and money 
over possible reduction of rates. 

No one in California has any 
confidence in the railroad commis- 
sion. The only benefit in years 
the Railroad Commissioners have 
done the state is to spend the 
large salaries they receive. A 
more incompetent, useless, (not 
even ornamental), generally dis- 
trusted set of public officials it is 
hard to find. 

If they so desired, the Commis- 
sioners could compel the railroad 
to supply enough tank cars to 
meet the demand. By so doing 
they would confer a greatei benefit 
on the oil industry than by lower- 
ing freight rates five cents a bar- 
rel, and then raising them again 
the week after. 

In Texas the railroad commis- 
sioners compelled the roads to fur- 
nish an adequate supply of tank 
cars. These extra cars were taken 
from California and sent to Texas. 
The railroad company should be 
compelled to bring them back. 

If the California Petroleum 
Miners' Association desires to con- 
fer an immediate and substantial 
benefit upon the producing oil 
companies of Kern county and 
Coalinga districts, and thus make 
its influence appreciated by the 
oil industry, it will collate some 
facts and figures showing the 
hardships worked on the oil in- 
dustry by the railroad companies 



through lack of transportation 
facilities and will compel the Rail- 
road Commissioners to force the 
railroad companies to increase their 
available supply of tank cars. 

A few weeks ago, Charles M. 
Hays, then President of the South- 
ern Pacific Railroad, wrote Dr. C. 
T. Deane, Secretary of the Cali- 
fornia Petroleum Miners' Associa- 
tion, that the company had 545 
oil tank cars and would shortly in- 
crease the number to 600. 

Under the present policy the 
railroad company instead of in- 
creasing its tank car capacity has 
decreased it, and instead of having 
600 in service has not 500 tank 
cars hauling California oil to Cali- 
fornia consumers. 

The result is that Coalinga pro- 
ducers were short of cars last week 
by over 100, and that Kern county 
producers were sufferers to a still 
greater extent. 

Here is a chance for both the 
California Petroleum Miners' Asso- 
ciation, and the Railroad Commis- 
sioners to distinguish themselves. 
The President of the Association 
is M. H. de Young, and the other 
members are Arthur R. Briggs, 
Henry J. Crocker, E. A. Denicke, 
Dr. C. T. Deane, Gen. J. M, 
Gleaves, Prof. E. P. Heald, W. O. 
Jacobs, O. A. Lane, W. B. Sim- 
monds, Geo. X. Wendling. 

This directorate comprises men 
of influence. If they will take the 
trouble, they can individually and 
collectively force the railroad com- 
pany, through the Railroad Com- 
mission or otherwise, to alleviate 
the present unsatisfactory con- 
dition of affairs, and stop this pre- 
vailing complaint of shortage of 
oil tank cars, and the resultant 
changing back of fuel consumers 
from oil to coal. 



In the unexpected death of Sur- 
veyor General 
A LOSS to the J. M. Gleaves, 
Oil Industry theoil industry 
of California 
has suffered a great loss. The de- 
feat of the scrippers in their en- 
deavors to wrest land from the oil 
men was due largely to the efforts 
of General Gleaves, and his en- 
deavors in their behalf will ever 
be remembered. 

General Gleaves was personally 
interested in a number of im- 
portant oil enterprises operating 
largely in new districts of the 
state, especially in Fresno and 
Colusa counties, and the develop- 
ment now being made in these 
districts was due largely to his 
efforts, influence and example. 

As a Director in the California 
Petroleum Miners' Association, he 
was ever solicitous for the general 
welfare of the oil industry, and his 
death will be a heavy blow to this 
increasingly useful organization. 

General Gleaves was a public 
man in every respect and always 
ready to put a shoulder to the 
wheel of the car of enterprise and 
progress. It will be hard to find 
a man to fill his place. 



Union Refinery. 

The Union Oil company has its 
gang of men and teams leveling 
the ground for its loading racks, 
which will be erected at Bakers- 
field as soon as possible. As soon 
as this is completed, says the Cali- 
fornian, the work of preparing the 
ground for the refinery, which is 
to be installed on its property, sec- 
tion 8, 29-28, will begin. Besides 
this work a hotel is to be built at 
an expense of $3,000. The bids 
for this were opened tcday. The 
company is also planing to begin 
laying its pipe line at an early 
date. 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY 



Pptomac Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



-REWEIVIBER- 



The Potomac has a producing plant in the Kern River field. 
The Potomac has a producing plant in the L,os Angeles field. 
The Potomac has a producing plant in the Summerland field. 
The Potomac has twenty-seven wells producing oil. 
The Potomac owns its properties and has no debts. 
The Potomac has an annual capacity of 360,000 barrels. 
The Potomac has an annual contract for 180,000 barrels. 
The Potomac has skilled operators drilling night and day. 
The Potomac has the very best of management. 
The Potomac has the finest equipment. 
The Potomac will soon double its production. 

The Potomac has the endorsement of bankers, manufacturers, mer- 
chants and investors generally. 
The Potomac is selling a small block of stock at 50 cents. 

MORE INFORMATION FOR THE ASKING. 

ADDRESS 

POTOMAC OIL COMPANY 

Potomac Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL RKPORTER 



BIG SAVING OF FUEL. 

Texas Firm 8avc« C5.000 Per 
Month— Over SO Percent 

Since the discovery of oil there 
has been a thousand and on. 
mates made on the relative cost of 



year ago. Brokers on the south- 
ern stock board have not yet 
learned the importance of confin- 
ing their trading to the floor of 
the exchange and the major por- 
tion of the business done is tran- 

coal and oil for fuel. Some of these SaC,ed on tl,c curb or "' ,he offices 

of the members. The result of 



were made by experts who figured 
heat units on a scientific basis. 
Others by oil men and the coal 
baron also had an estimate on 
the subject. Taking oil at value 
asked for it the results in favor ol 
that fuel were almost staggering 
and sounded to people who had 
never given the subject a thought 
like a fairy tale to build up the 
field. The Beaumont Enterprise 
says: Actual experience is be- 
ginning to come in now and the 
first one to be placed on record in 
detail promises to give fuel oil a 
boom that it never experienced 
before. Charles Clark & Co , 



such a state of affairs is that only 
a small percentage of trailing is 
recorded and the stick buying 
public which, depends on the daily 
papers for its reports of the mar- 
ket does not get a fair idea of the 
actual amount of business done. 
As a matter of fact trading in the 
various oil and mining stocks listed 
on the exchange is I'nr in excess 
of the amounts published in the 
daily reports of the institution 

During the week cl sing, Sat- 
urday, the 23rd, there was about 
an average volume of business 
With only slight variations in 



looked like a big ball of fire. As has occurred before, but in 
it came in contact with the oil single night has such a hea . 
there was a loud report, followed coating of the oil been depc 



by a hissing noise, and immedi- 
tlie territory around became 
as bright as day. All efforts to 
extinguish the llames have been 
futile. 



on the houses. 



Monte Crista Out. 
Notwithstanding the progress 
reported by the combine promoters 
it is reported that one of the great- 
est producers in the Kern river 
field, the Monte Cristo.has decided 
to remain out and conduct its 
affairs as it has in the past. The 
Bakersfield Echo says: That ever 
nee the movement was first 



dredging contractors, began figur- pnces - Senator has registered a 

ing on oil for fuel soon after Mc- decI,ne ' llavin ^ fallen off frorn 9° 

Faddin No. 1 came in but it re- t0 8s cents - Reed Cn,de which 

quired some time to build barges 0pened early in the weck at 34^ 



for transporting it from the field 
to the boats and holding the re- 
serve. On account of the time lost 
in making these arrangements 
they have just learned what their 
saving is in dollars and cents. 
Their boilers furnish 3050 horse- 
power, and following results were 
obtained from coal and oil: 

Coal per month I9500 

Oil 11250 

Transport 450 

Storage barge 3500 5200 



went 1038^ at the close Saturday. 
Slight advances were made by 
several other oil stocks and quite 
substantial gains were made by 
one or two of the favorite mining 
stocks. 

No changes of importance were 
made in either bank or miscella- 
neous securities. 



Difference iu cost coal and oil 4300 

Saving in firemen etc $ 700 

Saving in favor of oil $5000 

In the above figures it must be 
borne in mind that the expendi- 
ture of $3^00 for an oil supply 
barge will not occur next month, 
which will make the saving pro- 
portionately larger. The barge is 
used to hold a reserve supply for 
the dredging boats and wili last 
for many years, but is figured on 
the first month's expenses, which 
still leaves a saving of $5000 on a 
fuel bill of less than $10,000. 



Flow Growing Less- 

The reported decrease in press- 
ure at Beaumont is taking more 
definite shape, and there appears 
to be little doubt that if all the 
Spindletop gushers were turned 
loose at once there would be such a 
speedy dimunition in the flow of 
oil as would atonish those who 
have not kept in close touch with 
this oil field. 



Cannot Get Cars 

The Coalinga Derrick says oil 
shipments for the past week from 
that field were a hundred cars 
short of what they should have 
been on account of the scarcity of 
cars. 



Los Angeles Stocks. 

Nothing sensational marked the 
week's business on the Los An- 
geles Stock Exchange. There 
istill continues a fair demand for 
better known oil and mining 
stocks although it is not equal to 
what it was during November a 



Oil Conflagration. 

One of the largest lakes of oil 
in the Indian Territory caught 
fire from a falling meteor recently. 
Meteors came down in great 
showers for about an hour and a 
half. Eye-witnesses say that the 
meteor which fell into the lake 
was several feet in diameter, and 



Painted Oil Color. 

Beaumont was fairly steeped in 
oil during the night recently. Be 
fore midnight a light breeze set in 
from the south, accompanied by a • 

fog, and the atmosphere s unV to con'solidaTe the"larger 
was so heavily charged with oil imeresls ,„ (he , oca , fie , d ^ 

that many people were awakened 11 j . 

; company has been named in the 

by the odor. When davlieht i- . c n. u 

uuvugiu | lst f tdose t0 become a part of 

came a translormation scene had .1 u- u , j- • 

the combine, but according to in- 



been worked with many resi- 
dences. Dozens of those that were 
white or some other color were 
changed to a yellowish cast, and 
even the darker houses did not 
escape. In the case of many of 
the houses, the charge was so 
great as to entirely change the 
appearance of the buildings. This 



formation from the city, the stock- 
holders havedecided against such a 
move. The fact that the company 
is the owner of one of the choicest 
tracts in the entire district and has 
even at this date a very heavy 
production may possibly influence 
the action of a number of the com- 
panies which have yet to take up 
the proposition. 



Oil=Water 

Riveted Pipe 



and Lap-welded Casing for ( il 
Wells — For Irrigation — Mining, 
Power Plants and Water Works. 



TANKS 



For Oil, Water and Cyanide Plants. 

Smoke Stacks — Furnace Feeders— Dust 

Collectors for Planing Mills — Exhaust 

and Air Pipe for Mines. 

W. W. MONTAGUE & CO. 

San Francisco. 



^ /^'^ '^' ^Z^L*^'^'^*^'^*^ '^'^*^'^'^*^ 



Another Gusher 



BANKERS & BROKERS OIL COMPANY 

Owns 1000 acres in San Benito. Holds lease ou 80 acres in Kern River, and a lease on 40 acres in Sunset Midway in N. \V. %, Sec. 23, T. 32, R. 23. Every well 
sunk in the center of the oil belt has proved to he a large producer. Our property is in the center of the oil belt with producers on all sides. Our well is down over 800 
feet, we are drilling night and day and have passed through the gas belt into the blue clay which overlays the large, deep body of prolific oil sand which produces 
enormous flowiug wells from 500 to 1000 barrels per day, and we will have a big gusher in a few days. 

Sunset Midway district oil takesthe lead and commands the highest market price for refining purposes. Refineries and railroad are only a few miles distant from 
our property, giving us a market right at our wells for our oil. Mr. C. W. Fox, oil land expert, says, "we are as sure of large overflowing wells as though we had them 
now." This company will continue drilling wells until its land is fully developed. No oil stock offered the investigating public today at 15 cents a share, can show as 
much property, and as rich property, with such prospects for a big dividend paying investment, as the Bankers and Brokers Oil Company. 

A block of treasury stock is offered at 15 cents a share for development purposes. Par value $1 per share. No more will be sold at this price. Map of oil field, 
producing wells and prospectus free. J. W. Heisner & Co., Financial Agents and General Managers. 

BANKERS & BROKERS OIL COMPANY, 612 Parrott Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Oil Saving California Forests. 

Crude Petroleum is saving the 
forests of California. The; truth 
of this statement may be ques- 
tioned at first thought, but we 
have the word of the San Fran- 
cisco papers for it and they give 
facts in proof of the assertion, 
says the Minneapolis Times. 

The draughts upon the timber 
supply of California have been 
enormous for many years. In- 
terior industries and sections ot 
railroad operated at a distance 
from the seaboard have found 
wood cheaper than coal, or to put 
it differently, the price of coal so 
nearly prohibitive that they were 
compelled to use wood as fuel. 
The result has been that the trees 
left by the lumbermen have been 
disappearing with alarming rapid- 
ity under the axe of the chopper 
of cordwood and there was reason 
to fear that the forests of the 
northern part of the state would 
soon vanish from the face of the 
earth. Just as the people were 
beginning to awaken to the fact 
that the sources of their lumber 
and fuel supplies were in danger 
of early extinction the California 
oil wells came to the rescue and 
crude petroleum is now rapidly tak- 
ing the place of both wood and coal 
as fuel. One instance of the use 
of wood as fuel may be cited in 
illustration of the enormous con- 
sumption. The smelters of Shasta 
county have been taking some- 
thing like 80,000 cords of wood a 
year from the headwaters of the 
McCloud river. The number and 
capacity of these smelters was be- 
ing increased rapidly and there 
was certainty of an enormous 
drain on the forests. Now crude 
oil has been introduced into the 
smelters and the use of cordwood 
will soon cease. 

Railroads are usiug oil-burning 
locomotives and thus another 
drain on the forests is stopped. 
Oil is used in all industries in a 
constantly increasing ratio as com- 
pared with wood and coal, and 
the friends of the forests are 
pleased to see in the petroleum 
supply a possible preventive of 
forest denudation. 



they will find it cheaper in the 
long run. It is doubtful if the 
average producer appreciates 
what proportion of his production 
he loses, particularly in the case of 
small wells, by evaporation from 
the stock tanks. The 'smoke' 
around the tanks is not gas, 
natural, to the extent he supposes, 
but represents a certain proportion 
of his oil being raised to its lighter 
form and lost. The two means — 
pressure and temperature— of con- 
verting gas formed in this way 
back to its liquid form will work 
better in an iron tank than a 
wooden one. It is easier, for in- 
stance, with an iron tank to have 
a tight conical roof to catch the 
rising oil in gas form and hold it 
to condense to oil again and drip 
back. The cost of iron tanks is 
more, of course, but I believe there 
will be a big increase in the use 
of them, if iron doesn't go too 
high, and that it will be economy 
in the end to have them." 

To this suggestion, which is 
worthy a special consideration and 
experiment, it may be added that 
pending such experimenting there 
are many producers who may 
profit by seeing that the tankage 
they already possess, whether 
wooden or otherwise, is put in 
better shape, both as to leakage 
and evaporation. It is remarkable 
how many producers with no pro- 
duction to waste have their tank- 
age so poorly protected. It is 
poor economy that avoids the ex- 
pense of housing the tanks in the 
right manner. 



they are drilling down to the oil 
sand. I have had fires for several 
days for over half a mile down 
the canyon burning the oil that 
ran to waste from No. 3 while 
drilling and now this great spurt 
from No. 2 will necessitate doing 
the work all over again. 

" The California Fortune has 
such a reputation that every visitor 
to the district comes to see the mar- 
velous No. 1 flow and complains 
about his clothes and buggy and 
horses' tails being covered with 
oil from the driveway. No. 1 is 
not ' in it' with No. 2, nor will it 
be with No. 3 when it is finished, 
but when it is deepened.it will be 
just as big a producer, for I am 
satisfied the same strata of rich, 
coarse sand underlies the whole 
property." 



Wooden Tanks vs. Iron Tanks. 

"I predict" said an old-timer to 
a representative of the Petroleum 
Gazette, "that from now on you 
will find an increasing number of 
producers using iron instead of 
wood for stock tanks, and I believe 



California Fortune. 

The following is an extract from 
Superintendent R. L. Atkins' 
letter of Nov. 22nd. 

" Yesterday, Thursday the 21st 
inst., we had the biggest blow out 
ever seen in Sunset, and as far as 
I know, in Kern county. Well 
2, which we tried to cap without 
permanent success, ttew oil and 
rocks and sand more than fifty 
leet above the seventy-four foot 
derrick, showing a stream of oil 
over 125 feet high. This kept up 
for thirty minutes but unfortu- 
nately subsided before I could get 
a camera from the Colorada and 
California camp over a mile dis- 
tant. I should have the 'mudscow' 
back tomorrow and will make 
every effort to get No. 3 finished. 
The men are anxious to begin No. 
4 as they will have a few days 
respite trom dripping oil ' while 



Deserted OH Camp. 

Oil City is almost a deserted oil 
camp reports the Journal of Han- 
ford. No drilling is being done on 
the Home, Chanslor & Canfield or 
any other property very close to 
the Oil City. Chanslor and Can- 
field have a watchman at the place 
and he keeps the pump going on 
one well all the time and part ol 
the time on another. 



LION. 

320D at 08 

LOS ANGELES O. & T. 

10 at 2 10 

MONTE CRISTO. 
70 



256 00 



1300 at 
600 at 



I 6 7 y 2 . 



2210 00 
1005 00 



MONARCH OF ARIZONA. 



2700 at 20. 

500 at 21 

100 (S5)at 20 

500 (B6o)at 21. 



540 03 

105 00 

20 00 

105 00 



OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 



1100 at 
300 at 



23- 



242 00 
69 00 



Producers' Oil Exchange 

The following were the stock sales in 
the Producers' Oil Exchange in the 
formal sessions held for the week ending 
Wednesday, November 27: 

APOLLO. 

18 

16 

15 

BEAR FLAG. 

05 

CHICAGO CRUDE. 



4000 at 
500 at 
100 at 



3000 at 



720 00 
80 00 
15 00 

150 00 



190 at 



25 00 



75 00 



25 

CARIBOU. 

100 at 75 

CENTRAL POINT CONSOLIDATED. 

400 at 1 15 460 00 

CALIFORNIA STANDARD. 



OCCIDENTAL OF W. VA. 

200 at 32 

300 at 30 : 

PEERLESS. 

60 at 5 I2>^ 

100 at 5 00 

PETROLEUM CENTER 

2200 at 05 

2500 at 06 

200 at 04 

1000 at 06 

REED CRUDE. 

5oo(B6o)at 34 

400 at 35 

STERLING. 

950 at 1 15 

noo(B6o)ati 25 

2050 at r 20 

40o(Bgo)at 1 25 

50o(B6o)at 1 2jy 2 

100 at 1 22K 

500 at 1 I7J£ 

SENATOR. 

50 at 80 

200 at 70 

250 at 85 

TWENTY-EIGHT 

200 at 1 75 

310 at I 65 

100 (Bio) 1 70 

200 at 1 70 



64 00 
90 00 



307 50 
500 00 



no 00 
150 00 



60 00 



170 00 
140 00 



1092 


50 


1375 


00 


2460 


OO 


500 


00 


637 


50 


122 


.SO 


587 


50 


40 


00 


140 


00 


212 


50 


350 


00 


5" 


50 


170 


OJ 


340 


00 



Shares 43,090 



Amount $22,632 50 



4000 at 20 

FOUR OIL. 

1500 at 45 

GIANT. 

100 at 30 

HANFORD. 

10 at 102 00 

HOME OIL. 

325 at 3 40 

Ioo(S90)at 3 35 

Ioo(B6o)at 3 45 

ioo(Sio)at 3 40 

100 at 3 35 

ioo(B90)at 3 45 

INDEPENDENCE. 

200 at 08 

JUNCTION. 

2500 at 24 

KERN RIVER. 

75 at 6 00 



800 00 



675 00 



30 00 



1 105 00 
335 00 
345 00 
340 00 
335 00 
345 00 



16 00 



600 00 



450 00 



Pacific Coast Underwriting Company. 

Incorporate companies; furnish 
everything complete. 

Sell interest-bearing Gold Bonds. 

Underwrite stocks. 

Buy and sell Oil L,ands. 

Handle all kinds of mining 
properties. 

Information furnished investors 
regarding Pacific Coast Corpora-" 
tions. Address, 

Main Office, 507-8-9 Parrott Bldg., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Oil Stocks 

Sold in New York and all Eastern 
Markets. Oil, copper and gold com- 
panies financed. 

Hillyer, Clarke & Co., 

Bankers and Brokers, 
52 Broadway, New York. 

WANTED 

About |iooo to J2000 to finish oil well. 
A good investment. Address, P. O. Box 
117, Visalia, Cal. 



Fishing Tools 



Fishing Tools 



A full line of fishing tools constantly on hand for rent. Casing speais, casing cutters, swedges, combination slip sockets, slip 
sockets, horn sockets, bull dog sockets, under-reamers, rope spears, rope grab, rope sockets, spuds, boot- jacks, fishing jars, subs, 
spiders or ring and wedge, tool wrenches, tool hooks, jar-knockers, elevators, and anything else pertaining to the oil business. 

Bishop Fishing Tool Company 

91 Fremont Street, San Francisco. 

Branches at McKittrick and Sunset. 



50c Asphaltum Refinery 50c 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure 

Gilt>Edged Stock 

Inside of two months this valuable stock will cost you One Dollar. 



We leased land in McKittnck, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own So acres in Coalinga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have just secured 

601)0 ACRES 6000 ACRES 

of land that produces untold quantities of asphalt 
near Sargents Station. 



We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
asphalt at a figure which will enable us to pay divi- 
dends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract carload lots for crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

AH the houses are erected and foundation for Re- 
fining Works is NOW under construction. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned inside of 90 
days. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $20 per ton 
is better than the Trinidad at $35. 



STANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY 

475-476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 



Choice Oil Land for Sale 

We have been authorized to sell three pieces of land in Section 13, Township 29, Range 28, in that portion of the 

Kern River Oil district known as 

SOUTH OF KERN RIVER 

It is all patented land and the title is guaranteed. 

The Chicago Extension is now drilling on the land adjoining, with every piospect of striking oil. 

The Wizard Oil Company is drilling southwest of us. 

The Panorama had 150 feet of oil sand on Section 14, adjoining us, but lost the well. 

The land is only a mile south of Discovery well, where oil was first struck in the Kern River District, 

There is no doubt but that with a proper rig for drilling in the soft formations oil will be struck here at about rsoo feet. 

We will sell this land in a body, or will split it up into three pieces. 

We are able to offer It for a short time only at 



$60 PER ACRE 



This is over 50 per cent lower than any land is offered in this portion of the district. 

EASY TERMS EASY TERMS 

For maps and further information apply to 

THE PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments In Oil In Various Parts 
of the State. 



FRESNO. 

The St. Paul at Coalinga, will probably 
get rigged up and ready to start drilling 
by January 1st. 

The rig of the Investment Company's 
No. 2 is not completed yet, but will be 
soon. 

The Philadelphia San Francisco has 
struck oil and two hundred feet of the 
fluid is standing in the well. 

Echo Oil company has purchased and 
taken to its well in Warthan canyon a 
new 1500 foot cable. 

Philadelphia-San Francisco No. 1 is 
down in the oil sand and prospects are 
good for another good producer. 

Men are busily engaged in laying the 
pipe line between the Caribou wells and 
Sec. 28 trunk line for the Union Pipe Line 
Company. 

The El Capitan wells have been con- 
nected with the Maine State pipe line 
and it is understood that other wells in 
that section will connect with this line 
soon. 

The Maine State Oil Company has 
purchased the drilling rig of the Star 
Oil Company and will use it in putting 
down No. 4 on which work will soon be 
commenced. 

No. 5 of the 28 Oil Company is a fine 
well and flows very readily after being 
sand-pumped a few hours. It is said 
that this well will produce in the neigh- 
borhood of 200 barrels per day. 

The Fresno-San Francisco No. 1 is 
down over 400 feet. This well is located 
within a stone's throw of and directly be- 
tween the Philadelphia-San Francisco 
No. 2 which are both good wells. 

California Oil Fields (Ltntd.) No. 1 
on section 27 is in the lower sand. No. 
4 is in the sand 150 feet. Rig timbers 
were being hauled last week for No.'s 
6 and 7 on 27. 

Oil shipments from Ora have been 
lighter this week than usual, owing to 
the scarcity of cars and orders for 
thousands of barrels of oil cannot be filled 
on this account. Not one car was shipped 
on either Tuesday or Wednesday. 

The first shipment of oil from section 
31 was sent out a week ago last Sunday. 
It consisted of two cars and was shipped 
by the El Capitan and Maine State Oil 
companies, each shipping one car each. 

A new oil company was formed in 
Fresno two weeks ago which has taken 
up land in 22-14. It is called the Wal- 
lace Oil company and its territory lies 
five miles south of Alcalde and near the 
Venus Oil company's property. 

Mercantile No. 1 has been sunk to a 
desirable depth and was sand pumped 
this week. It is a good well. Work on 
this well was stopped three months ago 
and No. 2 was drilled, which is a good 
producer, after which work on No. 1 was 
resumed with the result mentioned 
above. 

Work was commenced a week ago last 
Thursday on the new road which will be 
used by the Section 28 Pipe Line com- 
pany along the route of the new pipe 
line, which will soon be laid from the 
Caribou wells to the Section 28 trunk 
pipeline. It is necessary that this road 
be completed before work of laying the 
new pipe line is begun. 

The underreamer which was stuck in 
the Commercial well has been fished 



out. This well is over 1000 feet deep 
now and has a string of five and seven- 
eighths casing in which reaches the 
bottom, but which will be removed, the 
hole made larger and seven-inch drive 
pipe put in. At least two hundred feet 
more of hole will be drilled at which 
depth this company expects to get oil. 

The Zenith Oil company has resumed 
work. This company has been waiting 
for seven hundred feet of drive pipe, 
which was ordered from the East a few 
weeks ago. The cars containing this 
pipe got mixed up en route and the 
twelve-inch pipe that was needed first 
was the last to reach its destination. 
Work will now be pushed along and this 
company's No. 1 will be put down as fast 
as possible, — Coalinga Derrick. 

KEEN. 
The Areola Extension has a flowing 
well. 

Monte Cristo No, 19, which was 
brought in two weeks ago, is flowing. 

The Red Bank is preparing to build a 
new 30,000 barrel reservoir at its camp, 
section 4, 29-28. 

Tremont No. 2, Sunset, is equally as 
heavy a producer as No. 1. Both wells 
are flowing over the casing and neither 
one has been perforated. 

The drill in well No. 3 on the Vander- 
lip holdings, section 25, 28-27, is rapidly 
being forced downward. The casing has 
been lowered to the 400 foot level 

The Earl Crude company is preparing 
to begin work on its holdings on 19, 11- 
23, adjoining the Sunset King property. 

Jewett and Blodgett are putting up a 
derrick on section 18, 11-24, and will 
begin the drilling of a new hole. 

The Apollo, holding a lease on 4, 29- 
28, is drilling a new well and is con- 
structing two tanks for the storage of its 
oil. 

The well on the "19" company's 
property, section 19, 28-28, has been 
completed. The casing was landed in a 
bed of clay at 1 165 feet. 

The second we 11 on the Illinois Crude 
holdings in the Kern river field is show- 
ing up well at the 420 foot mark. No. 1 
has been taken from the pump, pend- 
ing the settlement of the market problem 

The Mascot is making good progress 
with its work on section 26, 32-23, and 
prospects for a valuable producing well 
increase as the drill works its way down- 
ward. Wells Nos. 3 and 4 will be started 
as soon as possible. 

The Yankee Girl Oil company will 
commence active development work 
within the next two weeks in the Kern 
River district, on its holdings in 8, 29- 
28, between the producing wells of the 
Grace No. 5 and the Volcan. 

The Chicago Guarantee, holding a 
lease, operating on a section adjoining 
the Earl Crude is preparing to begin 
sinking a well. This part of the Stand- 
ard field is receiving a good deal of at- 
tention on account of its nearness to the 
terminus of the Sunset road. 

Encouraging prospects are reported at 
the La Mesachiquita camp near north 
line of Kern. The drill has passed the 
1200 foot level and while no strike has 
yet been made, the indications are re- 
garded as highly favorable for success. 
Work will be prosecuted as vigorously as 
possible until a depth of at least 15CO 



feet has been reached and it is hoped 
that the pay streak will be struck before 
that level is touched. Other oil de- 
velopment enterprises are awaiting the 
result of the work at this camp and if it 
proves successful there will be active 
times'along the north line. 

The Jewett & Blodgett refinery at Sun- 
set has closed down pending the com- 
pletion of the Sunset railroad. The 
company's tanks are said to be full of 
the refined product, making it necessary 
to suspend operations until the first ship- 
ment is made. 

The York Syndicate has struck the 
lower sand in the hole on section 8, 29- 
28. The drill was working near the 800 
foot level when the prolific sand was en- 
countered. The oil flowed over the cas- 
ing for several minutes and then settled 
down to a point within a few feet of the 
top. 

The Wizard, south of the river, has 
moved its smaller pipe and is now ready 
to send the drill still deeper. The eight- 
inch drive will be driven down to the 
level reached by the six-inch pipe and 
with the six they hope to strike the oil 
sand. Those interested in this enter- 
prise have a world of faith in the south 
side country and look forward to a good 
discovery within the next few hundred 
feet. 

Well No. 12 of the Peerless has re- 
cently been completed with seven and 
five-eighths casing. The nine and Sve- 
eighths casing, which reaches to the 
1080 foot level, is now being pulled. 
When this work is accomplished only 
the seven and five-eighths casing will 
remain for perforation, which is an un- 
usual condition in the local field. Well 
No. 13 has reached a depth of 1000 feet. 
The ct j ill in No. 14 is making good pro- 
gress near the 650 foot mark. The sec- 
ond string has been landed in this hole 
and the seven and five-eighths is now 
being lowered. No. 15 will be rigged up 
for business this week. The lumber for 
three more derricks is now on the way to 
the city. 

LOS ANGELES. 
The Whittier Oil and Development 
company's well is now down 1200 feet. 

The Central Oil company has struck 
the sand in N< . 29. 

No. 31 of the Central Oil company is 
down over 1600 feet and No. 33 over 1300. 

The Warner OH company has made 
nearly 500 feet in the company's new 
well, No. 6. 

The Whittier Crude Oil company ex- 
pects to complete the deepening of No. 1 
in a few days. 

The Whittier-Fillmore Oil company is 
down 1 100 feet with the well being drilled 
ou the Tubbs-Evans tract. 

The well of the Union Oil company on 
the Sanseniua ranch is down over 700 
feet. 

The Palo Solo Oil company will test the 
latest hole drilled on its lease for the 
purpose of ascertaining how much water 
could be produced for irrigating pur- 
poses.— Whittier News. 

The Murphy Oil company is now 
pumping Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 5 from which 
about 1000 barrels a day are being pro- 
duced. Drilling is in progress on Nos. 
4 and 7 aud rigs are being built for Nos. 
8 and 9. 

There is every indication that the New 
England Oil company, which is operat- 
ing on section 30, will secure a well in its 
No. 2. The hole is now down over 1800 
feet and the drill has penetrated a large 
amount of good oil sand, Theoil, too, is 
of light gravity. 

The Home Oil company will probably 
complete the deepening of No. 10 the 
first of the week and put the well on the 
pump. The hole is now close to 1700 



feet in depth. The company still con- 
tinues to experience some trouble with 
No. 13, the formation being the worst 
ever encountered on the lease. 

The Rayfond Oil company, after en- 
deavoring for weeks to pump its 2200-foot 
well on section 25 and failing to do so 
because of the loose sand in the oil, is 
now constructing a big sump hole and 
will bail out the contents of the hole in 
the hope that it may in this manner get 
rid of the sharp silica that has been cut- 
ting out the valves of the pumps. 

SAN BENITO. 

The Yankee Girl Oil company, besides 
its holdings in the Kern River, McKit- 
trick and Sunset districts, also owns 320 
acres in the Topa district in San Ilenito 
county where oil was recently discovered. 
The company expects soon to reach this 
district in their development work. 

At a meeting of the directors of Hol- 
lister Petroleum company last Friday, 
the attorneys of the company were in- 
structed to commence suit forthwith 
against all stockholders who had failed 
to pay the assessment levied upon the 
stock, and which was delinquent on the 
15th inst. 

SANTA CRUZ. 

One day last week there were two ex_ 
plosions of gas in the well of the Pajaro 
Valley Oil Co., near Chittenden, and the 
casing collapsed near the bottom of the 
hole and water rushed in and filled the 
well to the surface. The explosions 
were terrific. It is believed that the 
drill penetrated an immease storage of . 
gas. 

T. A. Piper, superintendent and also 
the largest stockholder in the Orchard 
Crude Oil company, now operating on 
the H- PI. Main place 3 miles north of 
Los Gato's, is enthusiastic over the pros- 
pect of finding oil in large quantities 
where they are now boring. He says 
hope has given place to certainity. 
Last Saturday this company took 35 
barrels of oil from the oil well near which 
they are sinking the new one, without 
lowering the oil to any perceptible ex- 
tent.— San Jose Herald. 

SAN BERNARDINO. 
The Kramer Consolidated Oil Com- 
pany has by no means given up the hope 
of finding oil in its well in the desert 
country, as it is now making arrange- 
ments to begin drilling at an early date. 
The hole was drilled to a depth of 1000 
feet by the Adams Bros. Contract Com- 
pany, and although no oil was found in- 
dications in the last 100 feet were very 
flattering. The hole cost the company in 
the neighborhood of {5500, but it is un- 
derstood that the contractors expended 
very close to $15,000 before they attained 
the required depth. 

SHASTA. 

The Shasta Consolidated Oil company 
has had a fishing job. 

SANTA CLARA. 

The gas well of the Watsonville Coast 
Oil company in the Gaffey district was 
capped last Friday. A bushing was 
screwed into the collar- of the cap and the 
gas was conducted through a 2-inch 
pipe about 100 feet long. When ignited 
the gas gave out a yellow flame with a 
light bluish tinge. It has been burning 
steadily since Friday and there seems to 
be no limit to the amount of gas in the 
well. 

SAN MATEO. 

Oil prospects on the coast side of San 
Mateo county are beginning to interest 
prospectors and there is promise of great 
activity within the coming six months 
At the Halje place on the western slope 
of the mountains, at an elevation of 500 
feet, wells have been sunk which produce 
from four to five barrels a day. It is 
proposed t o sink a large number within 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



a small radius so they can be operated 
by oneengioe. cxpcriv »howri 

that the flow of one well is r, 
by others close by. The oil has a 
paraffine base and is therefore quite 
valuable. Other operators on the coast 
are quite sanguine and work is l>eing 
pushed for» i- '. rapidly. There is talk 
of a pipe line to the sea to facilitate the 
shipment of the product to market. 

BENITO. 

The Union Oil company is looking 
very closely after its landed inter* 
the Vallecitos and is taking every pre- 
caution towards the ultimate result of a 
clear title. This week the company had 
a search made with a view of having all 
the tax sale reported. But one pi< 
found in this condition, on which hues 
became delinquent previous to the I nun 
acquiring title, and on which the taxes 
with the penalties were promptly paid. 
The I'nion Oil company owns about 5000 
acres of land in the Vallecitos which were 
selected by their experts and at no 
distant day will lie thoroughly developed 
for oil by this company. 

SANTA BARBARA. 

The Western I'nion company is hav- 
ing another streak of good luck, this 
time from an unexpected source. Well 
No. 1, which bad to be abandoned last 
winter on account of the casing being 
twisted by an earthquake, is now a flow- 
ing well of no mean proportions. In 
this hole, which was drilled to a depth 
of 2200 feet, there has always been a 
strong flow of gas, but early this week it 
behaved so strangely that it was de- 
cided to remove the cap Wednesday. 
The oil shot out, and has since been 
flowing over the casing. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO. 

The White Oaks Oil company, operat- 
ing on the San Antonio river west of San 
Miguel has let a contract to sink the 
well already commenced to 2000 feet. 
The company has a standard rig and 
complete outfit and the contractor who 
comes from Los Angeles is said to be a 
very capable m n. — Paso Robles Record. 

The casing is being drawn this week 
from the Nacimiento Oil company's well 
preparatory to shipping to Newhall 
where members of the company have 
property which tbey regard as being 
sure of production. The derrick and 
tools will soon be loaded on the cars at 
San Miguel and the operations of the 
company will be a thing of the past. 
Those interested in oil in this section 
regret to see this well abandoned as the 
indications were good all the way 
through the 1200 feet to which depth 
the well was drilled. — P. R. Record. 

TULARE. 

The La Mesa Cbiquita well is over 
1300 feet deep and in limestone with 
better indications of oil than ever. 



opened. It is located *bout which I hey gave a pi. 

twenty-five miles from the coast monstiation of the working 

and the product of the wells the pipe wrench, and were 

could be conveyed to the nearest awarded the highest medal for 

coast shipping point through pipe wrenches, 
pipes and by its own gravity —In- 
dependent. 



The Cuyama Oil District. 

Much interest is being taken in 
oil development in the Cuyama 
valley since the report that a well 
which was recently drilled in the 
vicinity of the Cuyama ranch 
house turned out to be a gusher 
to the extent of flowing about 
sixty-five barrels a day. The well 
was drilled by private parties who 
are not disposed to do much talk- 
ing about their success. It is re- 
ported upon good authority, how- 
ever, they are purchasing or leas- 
ing all of the available land in 
that vicinity, which is the best 
evidence of their faith in the fu- 
ture of the field. Should the 
hopes of the promoters be realized 
an ideal oil field will have been 



California -Utah. 

The California I'tah Oil com- 
pany's large standard derrick, 
seventy-two feet in height, is In 
place, and nearly all the machin 
cry. Including the twenty five- 
horse power engine and thirty- 
five horse power boiler, is on the 
ground and in place. A large 
frame house, containing three 
spacious rooms is also completed. 
A California chef is included in 
the working force. The Califor- 
nia syndicate's faith in the Green 
River oil field is best shown by 
their enterprising acts. They now 
have the finest well boring plant 
ever brought to Utah and are pre- 
pared to sink as deep as 4,500 feet 
in any kind of rock or shale. It 
is believed there will be from ten 
to fifteen plants drilling in Emery 
county, Utah, inside of ninety 
days 



Oil Well Workers Officers. 

At the recent annual convention 
of the International Brotherhood 
of oil and gas well workers, held 
at North Baltimore, O., the follow- 
ing officers were elected for the 
ensuing year: 

President, Lesile A. Herriot, of 
Bowling Green; first vice-presi- 
dent, S. E. Niece, of North Balti- 
more; second vice-president, 
Charles Fitzgibbon, of Bradford, 
Pa.; third vice-president, F. G. 
Pickard, of Ormsby, Pa.; fourth 
vice-president, Harry Lathrani, of 
Hammansburg; fifth vice-presi- 
dent, J. H. Hampshire, of Toledo; 
secretary, J. H. Mullen, Bowling 
Green, O. 



Progress on South Side. 

The Chicago Extension and the 
Wizard are determined to make a 
thorough test on the south side of 
the river. The latter has been 
active since operations were com- 
menced at its well on section 26 
and the C! icago has steamed up 
agnin after a delay of a few weeks. 
The parties interested in these 
enterprises are as confident as ever 
that good discoveries will be made 
on the south side, but since the 
dip of the formations are consider- 
able they anticipate that it will be 
necessary to go much deeper than 
in the country on the north side 
of the stream. 

Both companies are equipped to 
eo to any reasonable depth and 
will continue so long as the promis- 
ing indications hold out. The 
prospects are pronounced satis 
factory. 

Oil For New Mexico 

Twenty thousand barrels of oi 
were shipped out of the McKittrick 
field to Lordsburg, New Mexico, 
during last month. The railroad 
company has provided consider- 
able storage at that place and will 
make Lordsburg a supply point- 
The supply for the country east of 
this point will probably be secured 
from the Texas field, providing the 
supply at Spindletop continues to 
hold out. 



OIL WELL 



Casing 



M, GROSSMAYER, 

CONTRACTOR FOR 

Drilling Oil Wells 



Atlas Pipe Wrench. 

The Atlas Pipe Wrench com- 
pany, manufacturers of the Atlas 
Pipe Wrench, are believers in 
expositions — as their sales of pipe 
wrenches show a wonderful in- 
crease in the last few months — a 
great deal of it due directly to 
the Pan-American Exposition, at 




Box 213, 
Bakersfield, Cal. 

Room 17, 
I9 21 Chester Ave 



M. Grossmayer's Drilling Outfit. 



(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Crane Co. 

H. T. LALLY, Manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. 
24 FREMONT ST. 



) 



San Francisco, Cal 



AMERICAN, 

STEEL AND WIRE CUTPY 



Pacific Works 

The only Wire Rope Factory on 
the Pacific Coast. 



Wire 



We make 

Ropes, Cable and Hawsers 



For all purposes and with 
every possible combination 
of Wires, steel and iron, 
galvanized or plain. 



Fishing Tools 



♦ 

D 
U 

n 

D 
□ 
D 

U 
□ 
D 
□ 






a 

a 
a 
a 
a 
□ 
n 
□ 
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♦ 



We are prepared to ship at once 

to any part of the State all kinds 

of Oil-Well drilling and Fishing 

Tools. 

SPEARS, 

SOCKETS, 

UNDER-REAMERS, 

PERFORATORS, 

RATCHET JAOKS, 

RINGS and WEDGES. 

ANYTHING YOU WANT. 



Wire Ropes 
Of all Kinds 
For Oil Well 
Purposes 



©^ 



appliances 
Rope 



PENNSYLVANIA DRILLING COMPANY 

BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 



Send your orders to 

American Steel&Wire Co. 

LOS ANGELES— No. 206 North 

Los Angeles St. 
SAN FRANCISCO— No. 8 & 10 

Pine St. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



ASTHMA CURE FREE 

Asthmalene Brings Instant Belief and Permanent 
Cure in All Cases 

SENT ABSOLUTELY FREE ON RECEIPT OF POSTAL 

WRITE YOUR NAME AND ADDRESS PLAINLY 



CHAINED 

FOR TEN 
YEARS 




There is nothing like Asthmalene. It 
brings instant relief even in the worst cases. 
It cures when all else fails. 

The REV. C. F. WEX.I.S of Villa Ridge, 111., says: 
'Your trial bottle of Asthmalene received in good 
condition. I cannot tell you how thankful I feel for 
the good derived from it I was a slave chained with 
putrid sore throat and asthma for ten years. I 
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astonishment the trial acted like a charm. Send me 
a full-size bottle." 

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Rabbi of Cong Bnai Israel. 
New York, Jan. 3, 1901. 
Drs. Taft Bros'. Medicine Co. 

Gentlemen: Yout Asthmalene is an excellent 
remedy for Asthma and Hay Fever, and its composi- 
tion alleviates all troubles which combine with 
Asthma. Its success is astonishing and wonderful. 
After having it carefully analyzed we can state that 
Asthmalene contains no opium, morphine, chloro- 
form or ether. Very truly yours, 

REV. DR. MORRIS WECHSI^ER. 

Avon Springs, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1901. 
Dr. Taft Bros. Medicine Co. 

■Gentlemen: I write this testimonial from a sense 
of duty, having tested the wonderful effect of your 
Asthmalene for the cure of Asthma. My wife has 
been afflicted with spasmodic asthma for the past 
twelve years. Having exhausted my own skill, as 
well as many others, I chanced to see your sign upon 
your windows on 130th street, New York, and I at 
once obtained a bottle of Asthmalene. My wife commenced taking it about the 1st of November. 
I very soon noticed a radical improvement. After using one bottle her Asthma has disappeared and 
she is entirely free from all symptoms. I feel that I can consistently recommend the medicine to all 
who are afflicted wfth this distressing disease, Yours respectfully, 

O. D. PHEI.PS, M. D. * 

Dr. Taft Bros.' Medicine Co. Feb. 5, 1901. 

Gentlemen: I was troubled with Asthma for 22 years. I have rried numerous remedies, but they 
have all failed. I ran across your advertisement and started with a trial bottle. I found relief at 
once. I have since purchased your full-sized bottle, and I am ever grateful. I have a family of four 
children and for six years was unable to work. I am now in the best of health and am doine 
business every day. This testimony you can maUe such use of as ycu see fit. 

Home address, 235 Rivington street. S. RAPHAEL, 67 East 129th street, City. 

TRIAL BOTTLE SENT ABSOLUTELY FREE ON RECEIPT OF POSTAL 

Do not delay. Write at once, addressing DR. TAFT BROS'. MEDICINE O ,79 Bast 130th 
Street, New York City. 



RINGS 



RELIEF. 



BUY OR SELL 
CALIFORNIA 

OIL STOCKS 



. . . THROUGH . . 



JOSEPH B.TOPLITZ 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange. 
Member California Petroleum Miners' Association. 

330 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Orders for Buying and Selling California Oil Stocks 
Promptly Attended to. 

Reliable information on Oil Stocks Furnished Gratis. 

Unlisted Stoeks a specialty. 

Correspondence Solicited. 

Reference — California Safe Deposit & Trust Co., 

San Francisco, Cal. 

For Sale Cheap 
5,000, or Less, Shares Standard Consolidated. 

Any Reasonable Offer Will Be Accepted 



A Co-operative Well. 

The Mount Oso Oil company's 
works are located nine miles from 
Grayson, Stanislaus county, in the 
Coast range mountains, and the 
company is composed of Stanislaus 
people, who work upon the co- 
operative plan. No member is 
allowed to subscribe for more than 
five shares, and all stockholders 
must pay their assessments, which 
amount to $10 per share per month. 
A fund of $16,000 was accumulated 
before any work was commenced. 
The land was then purchased, and 
one of the best Tigs obtainable on 
the coast was purchased and in- 
stalled. The plant is capable of 
drilling to a depth of 5000 feet, and 
2000 feet will be sunk before the 
company decides whether to sink 
further or not. At a depth of 160 
feet flint rock boulders were en- 
countered which turned the drill. 
It was then decided to sink the 
shaft four feet wide until the 
boulder formation was passed. 
This work was concluded early 
last week, and now drilling has 
been resumed and seventy-five feet 
additional have been gained. The 
drills are now in dark shale, and 
water to the amount of fifty bar- 
rels per day is being contended 
with. Oil indications are common 
in that section, and a number of 
the springs have oil floating upon 
the surface of the water. 

While sinking the shaft a few 
days since several tons of adobe 
soil from the surface caved in upon 
a workman, Frank Winters, and 
he was imprisoned for over an 
hour before being rescued. In the 
meantime the water had risen five 
feet and he would have been 
suffocated and drowned had he 
been in the shaft half an hour 
longer. 



control of the fifteen acres. The 
payments were to be made in in- 
stallments. Before we closed the 
deed for the land we had an offer 
for $100,000 for two and a half 
acres. The deed to the fifteen 
acres was in escrow. We scraped 
together the $40,000 to make the 
first payment, and the next morn- 
ing received the certified check 
for the $100,000. With that we 
paid for the land, the claims 
against it and had some ' velvet.' 
In a few days we had disposed of 
another acre for $700,000, and it 
was not long before we had all 
our debts wiped out and mone> in 
the treasury. Upon the seven 
acres disposed of by the partners 
thirty gushers now throw oil. We 
still hold about eight and a half 
acres of the fifteen, up; n which 
we have two gushers. That is 
thetrue story of the Hogg-Swayne 
syndicate and its operations." 



Oil In Peru. 



They Work as Friends. 

Ex-Governor James S. Hogg, of 
Texas, has given the following ex- 
planation recently of what has 
been generally referred to as the 
Hogg-Swayne Syndicate, operat- 
ing at Beaumont: 

" I associated myself with Judge 
R. E. Brooks, of Austin, Colonel 
A. S. Fisher, of Georgetown, J. W. 
Swayne, of Fort Worth and W. 
T. Campbell, a banker, of JLampass. 
We work in partnership as well 
as individuals. The so-called 
' Hogg-Swayne syndicate' is not 
chartered, nor incorporated and 
we operate without the semblance 
of a written contract. We are 
friends and nothing better is 
needed. We bought fifteen acres 
of Spindle Top hill from a man by 
the name of Page, of Georgetown. 
Page was about to establish a 
town there. We gave him just 
$100,000 for his fifteen acres. 
Then there were two other claim- 
ants. Each received $1,000 an 
acre if he would surrender title, 
which they did. Then the lease 
on that fifteen acres held by the 
Eucas people was purchased for 
$180,000. That gave us absolute I 



Owing to indifferent efforts and 
complications on the part of the 
companies engaged in Peruvian 
oil developments, the industry has 
been for a number of years in a lag- 
ging i condition. English capital 
has been principally represented. 
The oil found is of the asphaltum 
base variety, of low gravity and 
used principally as fuel. A small 
amount of inferior illuminant is 
obtained by refining. There is, 
however, a good demand for the 
product for fuel purposes, and 
sooner or later the industry will 
no doubt assume important propor- 
tions. The oil is found at a depth 
of 300 to 400 feet, and is obtained 
by pumping, there being a total 
absence of gas necessary to cause 
any flow. Some wells have, never- 
theless, proved very productive, 
yielding as high as 400 barrels per 
day. The natives are described as 
a harmless and credulous lot, and 
the future of the industry will be 
dependent entirely upon foreign 
capital. — Petroleum Gazette. 



An Inspection Tour. 

Edward E- Doheney left Eos 
Angeles last week en route for 
the City of Mexico. At El Paso 
he was joined by Charles A. Can- 
field, W. H. Brown, Addison Lysle 
(of Pittsburg, Pa.), I. E. Kearns 
(brother of the senator of the same 
name) and other wealthy men who 
are interested in the Mexico Oil 
and Development company. This 
Eos Angeles corporation has a 
subscribed capital of $5,000,000, 
and the directors are making the 
Mexican trip to view their 
property. 

From El Paso the journey will 
be continued in a. Santa Fe private 
car, W. G. Nevin and other offi- 
cials of that railroad being inter- 
ested in the company. Two re- 
finers and a brick mason were sent 
on from this city, and six stills are 
on their way, it being the inten- 
tion of the company to refine its 
own product. 







Cm 

I 

S3 



| JAMES R. T. MERSHON 1 



m 

* 

* 
m 

$ 

ft 



Stock Broker 



537=538=539 PARROTT BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



m 



IV^^WW ^ ^WAVWMV 



References: San Francisco Banks. 



m 
m 

m 
m 
m 
m 
«\ 

\*f Authentic information furnished regarding corporations operating in the State of California ;Ii 



W I have trustworthy data always available. 
W Correspondence welcomed. 

* ft 

s « 

11/ » 



53 



'I 

§7 



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1 
1 

1 

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1 



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14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



OIL DIRECTORY 



reading Companies Now Operat- 
ing in California* 



flALISTOGA Oil, AND DEVELOPMENT CO. 

500,000 shares par value $1. 
Operating on 2320 acres located fn Napa, Yolo, 
Fresno, San Benito, Monterey and Kern counties. 
Officers: L D Hitchcock, president; R B Todd, 
vice-president and manager; B F Edwards, 
secretary; J M Caselman, treasurer; Dr. H G 
Thomas and Dr. E J Boyes. San Francisco 
National Bank, depository. Office, 23 and 24 
Merchants Exchange, San Francisco, Cal. 



/CYGNET PETROLEUM CO. 

Capital $150,000 

50,000 shares at $3. 

Location — Fresno county. 

Directors— ChaS. L Fair, president, Blitz W Pax- 
ton, vice-president, Chas. A. Lee, treasurer, John 
C. McElroy, secretary. 

Office— 561 Parrott Building. 

Tel.— South 184. 

pUYAMA VALLEY OIL COMPANY. 

Capital $1,000,000 

1,000,000 shares at $1.00. 

Location, 80 acres in 4, 9-25 in Santa Barbara 
County and 80 acres in 15, 10-24 in Kern County. 
Incorporated under the laws of South Dakota. 

Directors— W. H. Turner. President; Robt. 
Johnson, Secretary and Treasurer; Andrew 
Christensen, Frederick Misch, L. M. Hickox; 
Depository, Western National Bank. 

Pacific States Mining & Investment Company, 
fiscal agents. 

Office— 326 Post Street, San F-iancisco. 



D 



ABNEY OIL COMPANY. 



Incorporated. 
McKittrick district. 16 completed wells; no 
acres proven ground. 
Office, 330 Pine St., Room 5, San Francisco, Cal. 



fl REAT NORTHERN OIL CO. OF OAKLAND 

Capital $250,000 

250,000 shares at $1 

125,000 shares of treasury stock. 

Location of property, Glenn County, Calif,, 2,20a 

acres, near Elk Creek, in Stoney Creek Mineral 

district. 

Officers, B F Arnold, President, Geo A Gray 
Secretary. 
Office, 476 Teuth street, Oakland, 



M 



ONTEREY OIL DEVELOPMENT CO. 



Capital $1,000,000 

1,000,000 shares at $1 each. 

Location of lands: Coalinga oil fields, Fresno 
county, 160 acres; Panoche oil fields, San Benito 
county, 160 acres; Monterey county oil belt, 4280 
acres. 

Officers: Dr J L Roberts, president; JBS Malt- 
ly, vice-president; J F Moore, secretary; D J 
Boughton. treasurer; Bank of Monterej, deposi- 
tory. Office at Monterey City, Cal. 



OCCID ENTAL OIL CO. 
OF WEST VIRGINIA. 

Capital stock 600,000 shares par value, $1.00. 

Officers: Wm. Crites, president: F. M Graham, 
vice-president; J. B. Batz, treasurer; C. E- Hail- 
tone, secretary; T. L, Moran, manager; Kein 
alley Bank, Cal. Depository. 
M. R. Goldberg, 483 Ninth street Oakland. Cal 



OBISPO OIL COMPANY. Capital, $1,000,000. 
Number of shares, 1,000,000. Treasury 
stock, 550,000 shares. All stock fully paid and 
non-assessable. Incorporated under the laws of 
California. Properties in Kern, Fresno, San 
Benito and San Luis Obispo counties, Cal. In- 
corporators: G R Parkinson, President Bank of 
Palo Alto; Captain Frank Barrett. Palo Alto, Cal.; 
K W Brown, Fresno, Cal.; Chas E Bond, Minne- 
apolis, Minn, ; C F Alderson Chicago, 111. Offi- 
cers: John F Giles, president; Frank Barrett, 
vice president; Chas E Bond, treasurer; C F 
Aldeison, secretary, K W Brown, assistant secre- 
tary. Office, Suite 74. Citizens Bank building, 
119-121 La Salle street, Chicago, 111. 



OCCIDENTAL OIL COMPANY 
OF WEST VIRGINIA. 

Capital stock, 600,000 shares par value, $1.00 

Officers— Wm. Crites, president; F M. Graham, 
vice-president; J. B. Batz, treasurei, C. E. Hail- 
stone, secretarv; T. L- Moran, manager; Kern 
Valley Bank, Cal.. depository, 

Mostellar & Allen, San Francisco Agents, 346 
Parrott Bldg. Telephone. Jessie 1683. 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY. Cap'tal stock, 
J2, 850,000; Par value, $1.00. Has 2.000 acres 
in Kern, Los Angeles and Summerland fields, 
with 27 producing wells. Officers and directors: 
P V Schermerhorn, president; C H Ritchie, vice- 
president; R D Robinson, secretary and treas- 
urer; D M Schermerhorn and W S Morton. Prin 
cipal office. P otomac building, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Tel. John 2281. 



SALINAS OIL AND DEVELOPMENT COM- 
PANY. Capital, $1,000,000. 1,000,000 shares 
at $1.00. Land in Monterey county. Officers and 
directors: President, W N McCarthy, San Fran- 
cisco; vice-president, J J Gunn. Independence; 
treasurer, Wm N McCarthy; secretary. J B Olsen, 
San Francisco; superintendent, Jno CQuinn; C A 
Burchom, J E Baker, N A Dorn, W J Ellis and S 
S Simon, attorney, Hon Eugene F Bert, San Fran 
cisco Office, room 573-574 Parrott building, San 
Francisco. 



S 



URETY OIL COMPANY 



Capital $600,000 

600,000 shares par value $1.00 each. 

Location, 240 acres in section 20 and 29 T 3 N R 
16 W, S B M, Los Angeles County, Calif., Newhall 
district 

Officers and, Directors, M Esternaux. President, 
Geo. Greely King, Vice-President, T. H. Pearne, 
Secretary. D. A. Thieme, M. C. White. 

Farmers and Merchants Banks, depository. 

Office, 102 Henne Block, Los Angeles. Calif. 



S 



TANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 



Capital $300,000 

Treasury stock $150,000 

Location: 92 acres leased proven oil land in 
McKittrick; 80 acres owned in Coalinga near 
Home Oil company, Fresno; 160 acres owned ad- 
joining oil well in Napa valley. 

Officers: R A Falkenberg, president; R L Bis- 
by, vice-president; M J Henry, secretary; J G 
Steele, treasurer; F Cooke-Caldwell, attorney for 
c ompany. 

Offices: 475-76 Parrott Building, 85s Market 
treet, San Francisco, Cal. 



SUPERIOR OIL COMPANY. 

Capital stock, 500,000 shares, par value $1 each 

5960 acres of 1 in d in the Sunset and McKittrick 
district. 

Two Standard rigs operating at present time. 

Officers and Directors— R S Aston, president; 
W Dixon, vice-president; J W Crosland, secretary 
and treasurer, Wm. M Landess, W W Kelly and 
W G Wallace. Attorney, C C Cowgill. Office, No. 
17 Galtes block. Bakersfield. Cal 



U. 



S. OIL AND MINING CO. 



Capital $300,000 

Par value, $1 per share. 

Location: 320 acres in Kern River District, 160 
acres in section 27, 11-24 Sunset district, near Blod- 
gett & Jewett wells, no acres on fraction 26, 12-24, 
near Monarch, adjoining Jewett, Blodgett & Beal 
gusher. L- M. Underwood, president, F Ketelhut 
seci 'tary. 

Office— 211 igth street, Bakersfield.lCal, 



b <^J^.<*^*^<*^«^*^*^. , ^A<^^ $ 



Oil Prospectuses 



j 



1 



WALDORF OIL AND ASPHALT COMPANY. 
Incorporated Feb 25, igoi. Capital, $500,000. 
500,000 shares at $1.00 per share. Place of busi- 
ness, Hanford, Cal. Headquarters at McCord & 
Son. Location of lands, 1,2, o, Guadalupe, Santa 
Barbara county, Cal. Officers and directors: Geo 1 
B McCord, president, Hanford; Dr N P Duncan, ; 
vice-president, Hanford; J O Hickman, treas- 
urer, Hanford; Wm M Madden, attorney for com- 
pany, San Francisco; W H Worswick, field super- 
intendent. Hanford; F Brader, Hanford, N Weis- 
baum, Hanford, L S Chittenden, Hanford, W H 
Worswick, Jr, Hanford, Jas Manasse, secretary. 



Booklets, Stock Certificates, Letterheads, Envelopes, Dodgers, jvj 

Letter Circulars, etc., ^ 

Printed at short notice and at reasonable prices. jj 

Pacific Oil Reporter Job Office | 

Rooms 31, 32 and 33 | 

31S Pine Street, San Francisco | 

5 . ' ■ *j 



I 



ARIZONA INCORPORATIONS 



We make a specialty of chartering Ari- 
zona Corporations. Arizona has the 
most liberal laws in the United States- 
no taxes to pay, stock made non-assess- 
able, no personal liability for corporate 
debts. 

We take stock for our service, if you de- 
sire. We save you one-half the fees 
charged by others, and help you pro- 
mote your enterprise. We give you a 
certificate *hat you are duly incorpor- 
ated. All business attended to by an 
expert corporation lawyer. Correspond- 
ence solicited. 



THE WESTERN INVESTMENT CO 

Rooms 1 and 3, Porter Block 



PHOENIX 



- ARIZONA 



For Lease 

Twenty acres of absolutely proven oil 
land in McKittrick district to lease on 
royalty basis for development work. 
Chance for good, responsible driller. 
Securities required. 

For further particulars, address, 

W. G. KERCKflOFF 

Wilcox Block, Los Angeles. 



SUNSET 
LIMITED 



One of the most magnificent trains 
ever built. For 1901-1902 Tri-wbeki,y 
via Coast I/ine and Sunset Route for 

NEW ORLEANS and 

INEW YORK 

Leave SAN FRANCISCO 4:50 p. m. 
Mond ays, Wednesdays, Fridays. 

Leave LOS ANGELES 8:30 p. m. 
Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays. 

Arrive NEW ORLEANS 7:20 p. m. 
Thursdays, Saturdays, Mondays. 

Among the world's noted Highways of 
Travel not one equals the rou te of this 
train. Get the little book, " Waysid 
Notes," from any agent of the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Initial trip of Suuset Limited 
Friday, Dec. 6, from San Francisco. 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wrench {&£d?£g| g a KS2S 




Drilllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND "MONEY SAVED. 
It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits. 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. 



-MANUFACTURED BY- 



J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Oil Well Casing Oil Stills 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets. P. O. Box 231 

Telephone, Main 196. Baker Block. ' Station C 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal, 




Webster Iron Works 



DEPARTMENTS: 



MACHINE SHOPS 
BLACKSMITH SHOP 



FOUNDRY i 
PATTERN SHOP I 



m 

MINING, MILLING and MACHINE CASTINGS 



Rig Irons, Sand Reels, Sand Pumps, Drilling and Fishing f|| 
Tools, Hea-"y Forgings. ||§ 



Telephone 341 



21st and I Streets. 

BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 



PO.Box 463 



H 

■ 







For prices, etc., inquire 



W. FORfilE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacture! of 

Oil & das Well Big Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San 
Francisco, Cal,, Bakersfield, Cal. 



PACFIC OIL RRPORTKR 



•5 



Stock Guaranteed 

BY 

Gold Bond 

Bearing 3 per cent interest per 
annum, payable semiannually . 

Deposited as Security 

for full amount of purchase 
pric». 



Limited amount of 

NOl CK 

offered at Ji.oo per share. 

tlollister 

Crude Oil Co., Ltd., 

308 Market Street 
San Francisco 

Responsible Brokers Wanted. 



AMERICAN TOOL WORKS L s cooper, c. e.. i e. 



WONDERFUL SUCCESS 



SmithPremier £ 
Typewriters J 

Are Used Everywhere 

READ THIS LIST: 
Heald's Business College use 30 
Southern Pacinc Co. system . .47 

Western Onion Tel Co 36 

S. F. Public Schools now use. . .43 

S. F. Call " ..." 

Hale Bros ... " ■ ■ ■ ■ 14 

Viavi Co " . . . 13 

Cogswell College ' II 

Miller, Scott & Sloss . " ... 10 



Get information from us about 
the new SPEED Device. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

no Montgomery St., S. F. 



}0> prictor. 

M.V KRS OP 

Standard and Special Drilling Tools 



219 Crocker Bulld»<i£ 
SAX FRANCISCO 



All Sizes of Casing Spears for Rent. 

109=111 Mission Street, 

Bet. Spear and Main 

Telephone, Main 5578. 



Patent 
Redwood 



OIL TANKS 



r— -2 

£2 s 






3 

CD 



u- 



0T> 




42jfeet diameter. 18 feet high. Capacity, 177,500 gallons. 



Atlas Pipe Wrench 



Received highest award at Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, N. Y., 1901. 



IT HAS 




NO THREADS 
TO STRIP 



Made in four sizes — 10, iS, 24 and 36 inches. 

Atlas Tube Cleaner 

Received highest award at Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, N. Y., 1901, 



For WateNube 
Doilers 




I It Has No 

" My E 4 ua| 



Write for circulars. Ask your supply man. 
Manufactured by 

ATLAS PIPE WRENCH CO. Fl00d i u i ld ^ 8 



New York Office, 121 Liberty Street 



San Francisco. 
Works, New Haven, Conn. 



SPECIALTIES 

Petroleum Oil. Asphaltnm and 
kindred hydrocarbons 

A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

4 I f>, 41S J20, 422, 424, 426 

Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
ami Supplies of every description 
incidental to tie trade. 



We curry the Largest Slock. Our prices are 
BqnttaMe. 

Tel. Main, 1133. 



When you want to swear go to 

LEE D. CRAIG 

Notary Public and 
Commissioner of Deeds 



316 Montgomery St, 

bet. California 

and Pine, San Francisco. 



The Road to Wealth 

Headquarters School and Governmen 
Lands. . 

Lands all counties in California. No conditions 
on School Lands as to residence or cultivation 
Only $1.25 an acre. Locations in all Mineral Belt. 
— Kern River, McKittrick, Devil's Den, Mojave, 
Sunset, Uoalinga and other famous districts. The 
Cheapest, Safest and Surest Investment in Amer- 
ca. Send Stamp for Land Book. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 

Los Angeles, California. 

m,m Shares of Oil Stock 



DIVIDENDS. 

Dividend No. i was declared by the Ventura 
Consolidated Crude Oil Company Nov. 15th. 
Regular dividends will be paid quarterly here- 
after. Company has 4 producing wells No. 5 
dvilliug; 2720 acres of oil land; also rich gold mine 
in Arizona. To continue rapid development 
work a block of treasury stock is being sold at 
20 cents per share, par value, $1.00. — Full paid— 
Non-assessable. Reliable agent wanted. Ad- 
dress all orders for stock or further particulars to 

W. G. YOUNG & CO., 

Fiscal Agents. 
628-30 Laughlin Bldg., Los Angeles, Csl. 



The Star Drilling Machine 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machin 
oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 
ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. 



nnnnnDnanannnonnnunnnnnDnn 

D ^ 

a Before buying Oil Stock or g 
□ leasing or buying Oil Lands n 
g call on A. BARIEAU, Room g 
g 23 Columbian Building, 9i6g 
n Market Street, San Franciscon 

n Q 

annnnnnDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn 




Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 



The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a lim't of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 
recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are simple, 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Territory 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling aud Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON OHIO. 



I AUSTIN'S PORTABLE DRILLING RIGS 

• Made in sizes to suit territory. Simple, powerful, efficLnt. 

Crude Oil Fuel Burning: Plants for Boilers, Furnaces and Ovens. Boilers, 

Engines, Oil Storage and Wagon Tanks, Refining Equipment, 

Oil, Gas and Artesian Well Supplies of every description, 

Drilling and Fishing Tools 

Standard Wrough Iron Pipe, Cast Iron and Mal- 
leable Iron Fittings. 



Oil Well Casing, Tubing, Drive and Line 
Catalogues, Estimates and Sptcificatio 
furnished on application. 




Austin's Latest Improved Combination Drilling Machine. This machine will drill in ordinary formations at five times the speed of a Standard rig 



GEORGE H. TAY COMPANY 

49 to 53 First Street, San Francisco ! 

i m L. i 

Not Quantity of Land but Quality 

SILVER STAR OIL COMPANY 



Capital Stock 300,000 Shares 



Par'Value $1.00 per Share 



THE LAND OF THIS COMPANY comprises the SE quarterof the NW quarter of Section 28, Township 30 S., Range 22 E. This prqperty is directlyin line of pro- 
duction and within one-quarter of a mile of the famous Dabney wells, and land that cannot be purchased for less than $20,000 per acre, and only 1 mile from the S. P. 
R. R. station at McKittnck. Immense deposits of asphaltum are found on this land, as well as numerous seepages of oil and live oil sind on the surface. There can 
scarcely be a doubt as to the enormous value of this land, but the drill alone will tell 
WORK HAS COMMENCED Well No. 1 is now almost completed and is in oil. 
FOR A SHORT TIME ONLY a limited quantity of stock in this company is offered at 25 CENTS PER SHARE. Write for Prospectus to the 

Silver Star Oil Co., 607=608 Safe Deposit Building, San Francisco 

PLEASE WENTION THB PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 




Parke & Lacy Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 

21 and 23 FREMONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



OIL WELL DRILLING MACHINERY 

TOOLS AND SUPPLIES 

ENGINES, BOILERS, PUMPS, ETC. 

BOSTON CASING 

FISHING TOOLS FOR RENT 

Prompt Delivery. Correspondence Solicited. 
Agents for STAR Portable Drilling Machines 



Endorsed by the California Petroleum Winers' Association. 




KERR'S REPORTS 

(Inc.) 

MONTHLY OIL INVESTMENT 

TABLES 

Give prices, capitalization, assets, character ot 
charter, integrity of management and methods, 
well progress, production and location of oil 
corporations, etc.; official maps. 

We have oil field investigators, ab= 
stract searchers and credit examin- 
ers, the only systematized oil rating agency in 
the world. Authentic Special Reports on 
any oil compaiy, $2.00 upward. 

We have a list of 3000 oil companies; 500 
fraudulent; ?oo honest but hopelessly involved 
or incompetent. Do you own stock in 
any of them? 

Subscribe for KERR'S REPORTS 

MONTHLY and keep posted . . . 

One Dollar per year 

Address KERR'S REPORTS, Mills Building, 

San Francisco, California 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY 



Potomac Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



-REMEMBER- 



The Potomac has a producing plant in the Kern River field. 
The Potomac has a producing plant in the Los Angeles field. 
The Potomac has a producing plant in the Summerland field. 
The Potomac has twenty-seven wells producing oil. 
The Potomac owns its properties and has no debts. 
The Potomac has an annual capacity of 360,000 barrels. 
The Potomac has an annual contract for 180,000 barrels. 
The Potomac has skilled operators drilling night and day. 
The Potomac has the very best of management. 
The Potomac has the finest equipment. 
The Potomac will soon double its production. 

The Potomac has the endorsement of bankers, manufacturers, mer- 
chants and investors generally. 
The Potomac is selling a small block of stock at 50 cents. 

MORE INFORMATION FOR THE ASKING. 

ADDRESS 

POTOMAC OIL COMPANY 

Potomac Building, Los Angeles, Cal 



ei'-fe*'fe*>'fe*'fe*i'4t*'fe*>''fer»!'^ K'fe * -0-*, •U^±k*^K^HU+#-i^UrKi£?+i-kk*?kkP;-k! 



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$100 BUYS 

200 SHARES 
OIL STOCKS 

T n Ai Oil Company; 200 barrel well. Stock sold in lots 
of $100 and. up. Guaranteed against loss by 

Security Gold Bond 

Indorsed by a Trust Company of $1,000,000 paid up capi- 
al. Cash returned at maturity of bond. Safe, legitimate. 
Investigate. Stock shares in all dividends and profits 
Handsome illustrated booklets of oil fields, with official 
map, for 10 cents in stamps. 

ILLINOIS OIL BOND COMPANY 

Room 506, 167 Dearborn Street, Chicogo. 

Home Office, Room 7, first floor, Mills Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



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THE BEST CASING PULLER 

The Norton Ratchet Jack 



With Ring and Slips for Pulling 
Casing. 



ALWAYS SAFE, READY AND EFFECTIVE 



This j ack is self lubricating, pro- 
vided with ball bearings, giving 
maximum of efficiency with mini- 
mum of friction. No blocking re- 
quired, as the hold of the ting and 
slips is absolute. Convenient to 
operate, light and durable. For 
prices and particulars address 

M. G. WEST, 216 California Street, San Francisco. 




Bovaird & Seyfang Mf g Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OP ■ 



Stationary and Portable Boilers, Steam Engines, 

Iron Tanks, Rig Iron Outfits, Drilling and Fish ng Tools, 

And everything needed to drill and operate 



Oil, Gas and Artesian Wells 

Manufacturers' Agents for Tubing, Casing, Pipe Fittings, Valves, Etc. 

Natural Gas Plants a Specialty. 

Cable address, "Boang." ABC and Private Codes. 

BRADFORD, PA., U. S- A. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 









lijOI. 



Pkick. Ti 



IN VENTURA COUNTY. 

This Favored Field Being Rapidly I)e\ eloped. 

The Paxton Gold Bond Oil Company Oneol Manj Com- 
panies That Will Soon Be Paying Dh Idende to 
Stockholders. 



The Paxton Gold Bond Oil Com- 
pany, whose office is located in 
the Mills Building of San Fran- 
cisco, is a new company recently 
incorporated, that has made re- 
markable progress for so young a 
company. 

They are now actively (hilling 
their first wells in Ventura county, 
the oldest producing oil count v in 



This company having such a valu- 
able lease, some oil men re- 
marked that the securing of the 
same was due to "Kerr's bull luck." 
Those who knew the facts said it 
was ,hie to Kerr's business ability. 
The company started in with 
such rapidity that they laid two 
miles of water pipe line, hauled in 
and erected their derrick and in- 



at 15 cents per share had the 
amount oversubscribed by more 
than 19,000 thai 

The company has a branch office 
located at Paxton. Ills, where 
every county official holds stock in 
the company. 

They are well recommended for 
honor and integrity and i 
ample funds in bank for their first 
three wells which have been COD 
traded to Nettleton & Keilermanof 
Los Angeles. They have tuadear- 
rangeiuents to drill ten wells in 
one year, believing it is bet;, 
get a numbet of wells as soon as 
possible and thus reduce the cost 
and the general expense of long 
continued development Ten ' 

wells 111 the territory owned by 
the Paxton Gold Bond Oil Cora 
pany mean a fortune to its stock 



oil In, is for twelve J 

a railroad builder, having built 
il hundred miles of railroad 
in Baatern and Southern states. 
also completed a number of very 
•tracts for the United 
States government on the lc 
along the Mississippi river and 
thus ted with men 

of high business ability ami busi- 
ness atlairs generally. He has 
very high connections financially 
throughout the lvast and South 
which is a guarantee that the 
affairs of any company handled 
liv him and his associates, who 
are first-class business men, war- 
rants the statements that their 
company will be more than suc- 
cessful. 

Ocean transportation seems to 
be the s lution of the vexed trans- 




the State. Ventura county pro- 
duces the highest grade oil that is 
produced in commercial quantities 
in the State. The management of 
this company were very careful in 
the selection of their land, care- 
fully inspecting the various oil 
fields of this State before deciding 
upon their choice of location. 

A pipe line runs within a few 
hundred feet of their property 
that carries oil to tide-water 
steamers and the railroads by 
gravity. 

Their lease was secured early 
last spring with the very low 
royalty of one-eighth, while almost 
all the oil territory leased in that 
vicinity is on a one-fourth ro alty 



SB MRST well of tub paxton. gold 
stalled their machinery and drilled 
about 200 feet of hole in less time 
than any other company that has 
ever operated in Ventura county. 
They are now down about 600 
feet, have encountered uo difficul- 
ties of any kind whatever. They 
have 1 ijs casing almost to the 
bottom of the hole and the last re- 
ports were that they had numerous 
small indications of oil. . 

SALE OF STOCK. 

One remarkable thing about this 
company, remarkable from the 
fact that the present depression in 
the oil business and slowness in the 
sale of oil stock generally, is that 
this company, which placed 100,- 
000 shares on the market to be sold 



BOND OH. COMPANY IN VENTURA COUNTV 



holders, in dividends. 

A SPLENDID OPPORTUNITY. 

They are now selling a small 
block of stock of 1 0,000 shares at 
40 cents per share and guarantee 
ten wells in one year to the pur- 
chaser of its stock by putting up 
a good and sufficient bond, placed 
in bank in trust, and if at the end 
of one year the company has not 
ten wells, the stockholder has the 
option of surrendering his stock 
and taking the bond. They go on 
a very careful, conservative busi- 
ness basis. 

The management of this com- 
pany is in the hands of Mr. J. E. 
Kerr, who looks after the busi- 
ness in all of its details, as he does 
in other companies in which he 
is interested. ~^" 

Mr. Kerr before taking up the 



portation problem which has 
placed a temporary check on the 
California oil business, and the 
troubles with high freights and 
scarcity of cars have awakened a 
renewed interest in the oil indus- 
try of Ventura county which has 
the advantage of interior counties 
in that she can send her oil to San 
Francisco either by rail or boat. 

Now that refineries for illu- 
minating oil will be established in 
L,os Angeles, Ventura county can 
ship her oil either north or south, 
wherever the market warrants. 

The oil strata in Ventura county 
lie at such a comparative shallow 
depth that wells can be drilled to 
oil at much less expense than in 
other oil districts where the oil 
strata lie at much deeper depths 
and where the formation is much 
more difficult to pierce. 



THE OIL OUTLOOK. 



Reasons for Believing In Better Times Near 

at Hand. 



Facts and Figures Showing Growth of California's 

Oil Industry, and Its Establishment on a Sure 

Business Foundation. 



The last issue of the New York 
Engineering and Mining Journal 
contained an article on the future 
of the California oil industry 
written by W. J. Young, from 
which the following are extracts: 

Never since the petroleum busi 
ness of California reached the 
point of commercial importance 
have the conditions of the industry 
been so favorable as at the present 
time. There is not so much ex- 
citement as followed the discovery 
of oil in several new territories, 
nor does the general public watch 
the development of the various 
fields with the feverish interest of 
a year ago, but the actual con- 
ditions that govern a great enter- 
prise are steadily shaping them- 
selves into businesslike form, 
where facts take the place of 
rumor and actual calculations 
assume the place of speculative 
predictions, where oil is measured 
in barrels rather than in the 
sanguine imagination of would be 
producers; the consumer seeking 
the producers and the latter com- 
bining along the lines of the best 
economic administration of their 
work. Such in general terms are 
the conditions which obtain to-day 
as against the wild speculative 
rush of some two years ago. 

In the matter of actual produc- 
tion of oil the highest point was 
reached in April of this year, fol- 
lowed by a decline which reached 
its culmination in August. Dur- 
ing this period a very unsettled 
condition of the industry prevailed. 
Since August there has been a 
steady increase in the develop- 
ment work of the various fields of 
the State and consequently iu the 
output of oil. This growth has 
been slow and gradual. While the 
revival was not sudden, it is all 
the more encouraging on that 
account. 

The month of September showed 
a slow increase in the amount of 
development work done and all 
the while the different elements of 
the situation were being automati- 
cally adjusted so that the growth 
which has been registered since 
that time may be considered as 
permanent, bespeaking for the in 
dustry a contin ued steady improve 
ment from this time on. October 
has showed a still better record of 
work, although not approaching 
the feverish and sensational rush 
of earlier days. The number of 
wells completed in October shows 
n increase of 41 over the Septem- 



ber work, the increase of failures 
being but 3. Ihe small ratio of 
failures may be attributed to the 
fact that the greater portion of 
work done was in the demonstrated 
fields, the territory of uncertian 
productiveness being for the time 
left in the background until such 
time as the petroleum market shall 
demand greater drilling efforts to 
supply its needs. This activity 
has been quite general throughout 
the State, and while as stated 
largely confined to the demonstated 
centers several wells have been 
brought in in the outlying districts. 
The most notable increase in drill- 
ing operations took place in the 
McKittrick and Sunset fields, while 
the southern fields lying in arid 
about Los Angeles have shown 
more than their customary sctivity 

Back of this resumption of. 
material activity lie several well 
grounded business reasons one of 
which is the building of large re- 
fineries at several points in the 
State, prominent among which are 
the projected refinery of the 
Union Oil Company in the Kern 
River Field, and the large refinery 
of the Standard Oil Company now 
in process of construction at Point 
Richmond. The building of a rail- 
road in the Sunset District from 
Bakersfield has added not a little 
to the improvement of conditions 
of that prolific oil center. The 
combination of all of these forces 
will have for its ultimate purpose 
the development of the Kern 
County fields and a profitable dis- 
position of their product. When 
this has been achieved it will bene- 
fit not alone the local interests 
which it serves, but .the entire oil 
industry of the State, and will 
serve to stimulate activity in many 
of the outlying oil-fields. 

At Los Angeles, which is the 
commercial center for a number 
of well developed oil districts, the 
situation has been in an unsettled 
condition, owing to the long delay 
which was caused by the inability 
of the producers to combine upon 
a unanimous plan for marketing 
their product. Within the past 
two weeks this has been remedied 
to some extent by the suspension 
of negotiations between the Los 
Angeles Producers' Association 
and the Oil Storage and Transpor- 
tation Company with the result 
that the producers have given up 
the association and have signed 
individually with the Storage and 
Transportation Company. By this 



means the oil of the local field 
will be marketed through one 
channel which will contribute 
largely to a betterment of prices. 

Now that the year is drawing 
to a close, statisticians are begin- 
ning to figure their calculations as 
to the probable output of the State 
during the 12 months of 1901. 
Prominent among the calculations 
thus made are those of the Cali- 
fornia Petroleum Miners' Associa- 
tion which after having been sub- 
mitted to a conservative revision 
has arrived at the following con- 
clusion: The Kern River fields 
are represented by 447 producing 
wells, averaging 60 barrels per day 
each, which gives a total produc- 
tion of 26,820 barrels per day, or 
804,600 barrels per month. The 
output of the Sunset fields is 
figured at 70,000. Coalinga's out- 
put is figured at 300,000, and the 
Los Angeles fields are credited 
with 75,000 barrels per month. 
Former State Geologist W. L. 
Watts estimates the total yield of 
the State for the year at 7,000,000 
barrels, and several other estimates 
have been made ranging between 
7,000,000 and 7,500,000 barrels. 
According to the Petroleum Min- 
ers' Association these figures are 
too low, and the association gives 
as the probable output of the State 
8,000,000, or double the amount of 
last year's production. In the 
writer's opinion, even this estimate 
will fall short of California's out- 
put for the year 1901. That this 
opinion is not unfounded may be 
gathered frcm the following table 
showing the amount of develop- 
ment work done during the past 
six months. 

A belter idea of the amount of 
work in progress in the oil-fields 
and its distribution throughout the 
State may be had from the care- 
fully prepared table given by the 
Los Angeles Herald, reproduced 
herewith. 



a s* bn o, *j > 

= = 5 vug 

Wells completed 124 54' 71 48 75 72 

New productions 3402 120S 1385 1365 3230 2295 

Failures 23 9 24 7 10 13 

Rigs 66 45 38 48 93 116 

Wells drilling 433 414 402 419 464 507 

Total new work 499 459 440 467 557 623 

WORK IN PROGRESS. 

Oct. 31, 1901. Nov. 30, 1901. 
Fields. ' Rgs. Drg. Tot. Rgs. Drg. Tot. 

Shasta Co 0'4 4 o 4 4 

HurarV.dt Co 1 3 4 1 3 4 

Tehama Co. o 3 3 o 4 4 

Glenn Co 022 o 44 

Colusa Co 279 2 8 10 

Butte Co o 11 o 11 

Napa Co r 3 4 1 56 

SolanoCo 033 o 44 

Marin Co -. ... o 1 1 o 11 

Contra Costa Co 1 4 5 o 6 6 

Santa Clara Co 022 1 34 

Stanis-laus Co o 2 2 o 2 2 

San Mateo Co 033 o 33 

Santa Cruz Co 336 1 36 

San Benito Co 2 12 n 2 13 15 

Madera ...: o 00 o 1 1 

Fresno Co 4 18 22 5 24 29 

Tulare Co 224 1 34 

Merced Co o 1 1 1 12 

Kern River 27 *96 123 41 +99 140 

McKSunset 17I111 128 19 £126 145 

Monterey Co o 10 10 o 10 10 

S. L- Obi.-po Co.... 044 1 56 

Santa Baibara Co.. 2 it 13 4 11 15 

Summerland o 1 1 11 

Buckhorn o 2 2 o 2 2 

Fillmore 178 2 57 

Santa Paula 9 19 28 7 21 28 

Piru o io 10 1 78 

Newhall 5 17 22 2 16 18 

Los Angeles 6 30 36 10 24 34 

1,0s Angeles Co o 2 2 3 3 6 

Whittier 4 24 28 5 20 25 

Fullerton. 5 30 35 2 33 35 

Puente o 3 3 1 5 6 

RiversideCo 112 1 12 

San Bernardino o 4 ,1 o 5 5 

San Diego Co 088 2 01 12 

Totals 93 464 557 116 507 623 

*Of the 99 wells drilling work is temporarily 



suspended on 19, leaving actual drilling in pro- 
gress on 80 wells. 

tOf the 126 wells drilling wcik is temporarily 
suspended on 56. leaving actual dril'iog in pro* 
gress on 7 wells. 

Increase in new rigs ., 23 

Increase in wells drilling 43 

Total increase 66 

COMPLETES WORK. 

Oct. 31, 1901. Nov 30, 1901. 

Wells Wells 



Fields a o ~ E o = 

3 £ £ s £ S. 

Colusa Co — — — 2 o 2 

Contra Costa Co. — — — 1 01 

Humboldt Co. . .. 1 40 o — — — 

Tehama Co 1 50 o — — — 

Santa C'ara Co . . 1 40 o - — — 

Tulare Co 1 25 b — — — 

Fresno Co ...... 3 120 o 6 160 2 

Kings Co — — — 1 01 

K em River., 25 960 1 28 1080 1 

McK-Sunset 17 680 7 12 280 5 

Summerland o 000 01 

Santa Barbara. . — — — 2 10 

Santa Paula 4 270 o 2 105 o 

Piru 1 30 o 1 40 — 

Newhall 2 160 o 2 70 — 

Los Angeles Co. o 000 00 

Los Angeles 13 575 c 11 380 o 

Whittier 2 fco o o o o 

Puente o o o 2 60 o 

Fulleiton 3 210 1 3 120 o 

RiversideCo 1 30 o 1 — 1 

San Diego Co.. .. o 001 — 1 

Totals 75 3250 10 72 2295 13 

Decrease in completed wells 3 

Decrease in new daily production . . . 955 
Increase in failures. 3 

When it is considered that this 
represents merely the work of a 
single month it is plainly shown 
what the aggregate work of a year 
would produce. 

With such an increasing pro- 
duction, one of the economic de- 
mands of the situation is a like 
increase of consumption, and an 
ideal adjustment would require 
that the one keep pace with the 
other. That this has not been the 
case heretofore has been one of 
the principal drawbacks from 
which the industry has suffered. 
It is but natural that such would 
be the situation owing to the new- 
ness of the oil industry and the 
educational work necessary to 
interest consumers in the new fuel 
and enlighten them to its advant- 
ages. That the demand for oil 
is rapidly increasing cannot be 
denied. In San Francisco two 
years ago less than iooo barrels of 
oil were used during the entire 
12 months, while to-day there are 
being consumed over r,ooo,ooo 
barrels. If the market should ex- 
pand during the next two years in 
like proportion (which of course 
is impossible) it would far outstrip 
the supply. The most accurate 
figures obtainable estimate that 
the railroads will use during the 
present year 4,000,000 barrels, and 
that the four big refineries operat- 
ing in the State at the present 
time will absorb an additional 
1,500,000 barrels. The total re- 
quirements of the State are placed 
at over 7,000,000 barrels. With 
the unbiased assurance which these 
figures give, there is not only room 
for encouragement among those in- 
terested in the oil industry, but 
the immense possibilities within 
their grasp are easily apparent. 
It would be profitless to attempt 
any forecast of the future, as the 
conditions which already govern 
are sufficiently strong to preclude 
anything but the best possible 
future for the oil interests in 
California. 

Repeat Orders Tell the Tale. 

The Atlas Pipe Wrench com- 
pany report that a well known 
jobbing housein the Middle States 
has placed four orders for quanti- 
ties of Atlas pipe wrenches in the 
last forty days, — a new stock or- 
der every ten days.— Not so bad. 



AFTER BORNEO OIL. 

The Standard is Snid to II mc 
Bought Out a Big Compan\. 
A recent dispatch states that the 
Standard Oil company is neg 
ing for the purchase of the 
Transport and Trading Company, 
whose capital is 2,000,000 pounds 
sterling, with the view of getting 
control of the Borneo and far 
eastern oil iuterests of that con- 
cern. Sir Marcus Samuel, chair- 
man of the Shell Company, stated 
that it was impossible to tell at 
present if the negotiations n 
be successful. He added that the 
Standard Company for several 
years wanted to buy the Shell 
interests, but it had not hitherto 
offered terms which were con- 
sidered. It is rumored that the 
Standard Oil Company offered 
8,000,000 pounds sterling for the 
Shell Company. The accompany- 
ing cut represents one of the Shell 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



■ hen 
the pioneer ef! 
owing oil be found here and 
in the very near future the 
duction of this fluid will be the 
most interesting and absorbing 
industry in I'tab. 

Petroleum la New Krun«»kk. 

The I'etrolia Topic has an inter- 
view with a well informed gentle- 
man from Moncton. N. H., in 
which the facts as to petroleum 
discovery and development in 
New Brunswick are given, and 
from which we take the follow- 
ing: 

1 half a century past oil has 
been known to exist in New 
Brunswick, notwithstanding that 
an eminent Dominion geologist 
declared not many years ago. that 
not one gallon was to be found in 
the province. The position today 
is that four wells have been sunk 



months that the matter of cxplora- 
.is been taken up in a prac- 
tical manner. 

A I'u vincial company has been 
formed, having a provincial charter, 
giving it certain privileges in re- 
turn for an annual outlay in ex- 
ploration, and it is under this 
charter that the present explora- 
tions have been made. The Hon 
orable II. R. Kmmerson, If. P., ex- 
Premier of New Brunswick, is 
interesting himself largely in the 
matter of promoting development, 
and he says that in a very short 
time a refinery will be established, 
and oil pumped to a central place, 
probably at or near the City of 
MonctOD. The oil territory is said 
to extend through the counties of 
Westmoreland and Albert, and 
also in many of the north shore 
counties, so called, of the Province. 
In the county of Albert there are 
large deposits of oil shales, which 



'urn 
to coal from lack of abilitj 

portation for the former fuel. 
An oil paper th iken the 

railroads to task and makes the 
statement that the Standard Oil 
company alone seems ublc to 
shipments through. This company 

its own cars and | 

bly a private understanding with 
the roads, atall events the Pacific 
On. Rb PORTS B says that if the 
railroad does not want to injure 
the field it shouid get those cars 
back from Texas. Those who read 
this at the Texas end of the line 
will probably smile ami wonder, 
that as Peter has been robbed to 
pay Paul, why the latter is not 
getting more of the looting, or 
rather more cars. 

The conditions that obtain in 
San Francisco will be duplicated 
here unless relief comes. The 
Union Iron Works used a car and 



I 




THE SUFXr. COMPANY'S TANK STIiAMF.R 



. i ■ . 

lit E", ONE OF THE STEAMERS INCLUDED i.\ Tm. 



JRTEIi 1'URCIIASli Ob THE STANDARD OIL C-JMI'A.NY. 



Company's tank steamers, Cowrie, 
after discharging cargo. 

If the report of the purchase is 
true it may have a great effect so 
far as the shipment of oil to the 
Philippines and elsewhere is 
concerned. 



Utah Oil Notes 

If flowing oil is encountered in 
the wells of the San Rafael, Cali- 
fornia-Utah and Milton Oil com- 
panies, all located some distance 
apart, the fact will be established 
that Emery county possesses fully 
half a million acres of oil-produc- 
ing land. The Emery County 
Progress says oil is found here in 
hundreds of places, but flowing 
oil in paying quantities must be 
obtained before ours is proven to 
be an oil region. Unless the 
hardest sort of luck obtains, within 
the next ninety days we will know 
whether the fates are kind or only 
fooling with us. If productive oil 
wells are opened up by these com- 
panies—as we have every reason 
to hope will be — in a year hence 
there will be a hundred or more 
such wells all around us, for it will 
be an easy matter to interest 



within the past few months and 
are yielding a steady flow of oil, 
and others are being sunk in an- 
other district. 

The oil wells already existing 
are in the county of Westmore 
land, near Memramcook, about 
thirty miles from Moncton. The 
oil is found at a depth of 300 to 
400 feet, and the wells are within 
pumping distance of each other. 
The quality of the oil is declared 
to be equal to that of the Black 
Sands of Pennsylvania. Professor 
Schaler of Hartford, has declared 
in a written report that the city 
of Moncton is the centre of a large 
unexplored district, and that the 
richest yield of oil will be nearer 
that city and at a much greater 
depth than any of the wells 
hitherto sunk. About twenty- 
five years ago oil wells were sunk 
and yielded in paying quantities; 
natural gas was also found, and 
our local industry in Memramcook 
used this natural gas for manu- 
facturing purposes. For reasons 
altogether apart from the question 
of supply further explorations 
were abandoned, and it has only 
been during the past eighteen 



are also being developed by an- 
other company. According to the 
promoters, there will be an almost 
immediate large increase of outlay 
in promoting this development of 
the oil properties, and it cannot 
take place without a v;ry con- 
siderable effect in the Province 
of New Brunswick generally. The 
royalty from the oil which will go 
to the Province is based upon the 
output at the well's mouth. 



LISTEN TO THIS. 



Texas Joins with California About 
Shortage of Tank Cars. 

The Enterprise to-day re-pub- 
lishes elsewhere the plaint of the 
California petroleum men concern- 
ing the shortage of oil cars. It 
seems that the same conditions 
exist there as here and the same 
railroad is involved in both in- 
stances. The Pacific coast conten- 
tion is that it has been robbed of 
cars to fit out the Texas field and 
as a reverse claim is being made 
here it seems that at neither end 
of this road will applicants get 
much relief. The Union Iron 
Works at San Francisco had been 



one-half a day and will not return 
to the use of oil unless it can make 
a contract with the Standard, 
which means shipments that can 
be depended on. It looks consider- 
ably at that end of the line as if 
the roads were playing into the 
hands oftheoctopus.at thisend as if 
they were playing into those of 
the coal men. That a transcon- 
tinental road needing such a large 
tank car service should be short at 
each end of the line at the same 
time is significant — that it is so is 
a fact. — Beaumont Enterprise. 



Pacific Coast Underwriting Company. 

Incorporate companies; furnish 
everything complete. 

Sell interest-bearing Gold Bonds. 

Underwrite stocks. 

Buy and sell Oil Lands. 

Handle all kinds of mining 
properties. 

Information furnished investors 
regarding Pacific Coast Corpora- 
tions. Address, 

Main Office, 507-8-9 Parrott Bldg., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Hndofsed By the California Petroleum 
Miners* Association. 



W B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 

Of FiCfi and Editorial Rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



Telephone, Bush, 176 
TERMS 

OWE Year $250 

Six Months 1 50 

Three Months 1 00 

Si nolb Copies 10c 

STRICT!/? IN ADVANCE 



Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Re- 
porter, 318 Fine street, San Francisco, rooms 
3 1-321*33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name ana address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 



Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal 
as second-class matter. 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6, 1901 

Last year the Pacific Oil, Re- 
porter pub- 
Already a lished a New 

Great Success Year's edition 
which, by illus- 
trations and statistics, showed what 
had been accomplished in the 
various oil districts of California. 
This edition met with the un- 
qualified approval of those in- 
terested in the oil development of 
the Pacific Coast, and was soon 
exhausted. 

This year's New Year number 
of the Pacific Oil Reporter 
will be superior in every respect 
to that of last year. 

Our photographer is now in the 
field taking views of all the great 
producing wells, and photograph- 
ing scenes which represent the 
main topographic characteristics of 
the different oil districts. 

This edition will include in its 
descriptions the oil fields of every 
county in the state, from San 
Diego to Humboldt. 

It will contain articles from the 
best-known oil men of the Pacific 
Coast — from the geologists who 
have located the fields as well as 
from those who have invested the 
capital which drilled the wells into 
the oil sand. 

It will also contain articles from 
those who have made a success in 
handling the oil and who have 
sold it at satisfactory prices. 

The edition will also contain ex- 
haustive articles showing the re- 
sults that have been accomplished 
in burning the new fluid, and 
how much saving has been effected 
by oil over coal. 

The edition is now well under 
way and orders for advertising 
and extra copies should be sent in 
at once. 



TANK CAR SHORTAGE. 

Railroad Can Of fer No Excuse Fop 
Present State Of Affairs. 

The Los Angeles Herald in com- 
menting on the inability of the 
railroads to furnish transportation 
for the oil output of the State says 
that some papers have undertaken 
to explain this long-continued 
shortage of tank cars by averring 
that both of the railroad companies 
have from time to time ordered 
additional cars, but have neither 
been able to get all they desired 
or even a sufficient number to even 
approximately keep pace with the 
increased production. It is true 
that a little better than a year ago 
the railroad company could not 
have anticipated the tremendous 
development in the Kern River 
field, or, indeed, in other of the oil 
fields, but the time has long gone 
by when there existed any such 
excuse. The Southern Pacific has 
facilities for turning out a limited 
number of cars at Sacramento, and 
car manufacturers in the east are 
reported as being [able to take 
orders for 100 cars at one time and 
guarantee a 60 to 90 day delivery. 
The difficulty that the oil pro- 
ducers in this State have suffered 
under is also being acutely felt in 
the Texas field, butthe Beaumont 
operators have adopted radical 
methods and have not only laid 
pipe lines, chartered tank steamers 
and are engaged in building a fleet 
of barges, but the la ge companies 
are having their own cars built. 
For instance, the Victor Oil com- 
pany, not the largest of the Spin- 
dletop companies, but nevertheless 
a well organized corporation, re- 
cently placed an order for 100 cars. 
"We had no difficulty in getting 
them," said Manager Newton J. 
Skinner, "and wc found two or 
three car manufacturers ready and 
anxious to take our order and 
guarantee a quick delivery to any- 
one that wanted them. One com- 
pany had 80 or 90 cars on hand 
ready for delivery. Indeed, the 
car manufacturers have been rush- 
ing tank cars, and will be able to 
deliver several hundred should the 
railroads want them in a hurry." 

While thus telling of what his 
own company is doing in the 
premises, Mr. Skinner made some 
suggestive remarks that may not 
altogether be without point in this 
state. 

" I believe," said he, "that the 
railroads want the oil companies 
to make their own investments in 
tank cars. But the oil companies 
that do buy their own equipment 
will not let the railroads have all 
the benefits, as the law compels 
the roads to furnish equipment for 
freight offered. Our cars we in- 
tend to use for our special busi. 
ness and only for our own inter- 
ests. We have not "purchased 
these cars to lend them to the 
railroads, and the oil producing 
interests of Spindletop are prepar- 
ing to ask the railroad commission 



to jack-up the railroads, for not 
supplying cars enough for the 
amount of freight offered. But 
the commission wants to give the 
roads a reasonable time to get 
ready. It is now a question of 
what constitutes a 'reasonable 
time.' The oil companies claim 
to be able to place an order for 
100 cars or more with a guarantee 
of sixty to ninety days' delivery, 
and they say there is no reason 
why the railroads should not do 
the same thing or even better." 

And all of this might just as 
readily apply to conditions in this 
state as in Texas. The railroads 
are and have been for a consider- 
able time perfectly well acquainted 
with the condition in the oil fields 
— the depth of sand and its pro- 
ductivity. A market has been 
built up in spite of rather than 
because of the railroads, and now 
at this late date the roads are 
causing heavy pecuniary loss to 
the producers by failing to fur- 
nish equipment, and, as has here- 
tofore been shown, compelling 
large consumers to revert to the 
use of coal owing to a failure to 
receive the continuous and regu- 
lar supply of fuel oil that they 
had counted upon when first they 
changed their furnaces from coal 
to oil burners. 



THE YANKEE GIRL. 

Good reports continue from the 
Yankee Girl Oil Company. The 
Los Angeles wells continue to 
show up a better product than was 
expected of them, and the existing 
contracts provide for a satisfactory 
price for the oil at the wells. 

The company will soon com- 
mence development work in its 
property in the Kern River oil 
district, and this fact alone has oc- 
casioned a good demand for the 
company's stock, especially in the 
eastern states. The company has 
sold a number of blocks of stock 
recently, and the development of 
the Kern River district will com- 
mence at once. 

The Yankee Girl Oil Company 
is one of the most successful of the 
companies now operating in the 
State, and the hard work it has 
done merits the success the com- 
pany has achieved. The men at 
the head of affairs are sound busi- 
ness men, and are wasting neither 
time nor money. 



Los Angeles Stocks. 

A trifle more activity was shown 
in the stock trading on the Los 
Angeles Exchange during the last 
week of November. This was 
distributed pretty generally among 
the different listed securities. As 
a whole the trading was some 
what in excess of that of previous 
weeks although prices remained 
about stationary. Fullerton oil 
was one of the most active stocks 
and registered an advance of J^ a 
cent. Reed Crude appeared often 
in the transactions but gained 
nothing over the closing price of 



the previous week. The majority 
of sales were made at 33 Yi cents 
at which point it closed strong 
Saturday. Westlake sold in 
limited amounts at s^cents which 
is a slight gain over the last sales 
made. Senator is still weak, as 
are also Central and Alpha, Other 
listed stocks have shown little or 
no change. 

Among the unlisted securities 
only a small amount of business 
was transacted. 

Mining stocks continue in fair 
demand with better prices ruling. 
No trading of importance occurred 
either in bank stock or miscellan- 
eous securities. 



TRADE PRICES. 



Figures For the Wholesale and 
Retail Oil Trade. 

An Investigation of the local 
differences in the prices of four 
leading articles, embracing illu- 
minating oil, sugar, salt and bak- 
ing powder, produced by certain 
industrial combinations, has just 
been completed by the Industrial 
Commission and the results are 
published in a special report of 
140 pages. The repoit will con- 
stitute a part of the forthcoming 
volume on Trusts and Industrial 
Combinations, involving the work 
of the Commission for the patt 
three years. 

From this report the following 
comparison of the average whole- 
sale price, including freight, the 
average retail price, the profit per 
gallon and the rate per cent of 
profit is given: 

Average Average Profit Per 

Wholesale Retail per Cent 

Price. Price. gallon of 

State. Cts. Cts. Cts. Profit 

Alabama 1308 16. S6 3.78 :q 

Arkansas r3.so 17.69 4.49 33 

California 14.60 15.89 1.29 8 

Colorado 16.90 21.22 4.32 25 

Connecticut 975 12.21 2.46 25 

Delaware.. 9.16 12.00 2.84 31 

Florida 13.36 15.72 236 17 

Georgia 13.52 17.95 4-43 32 

Idaho ....21.S4' 31.56 9.72 44 

Illinois 9.2a 11-93 273 30 

Indiana 8.33 1118 2 85 34 

Iowa - 10.34 13 19 2.85 27 

Kansas 12.57 15.00 243 19 

Kentucky 8.74 11.40 2.66 30 

Louisiana 10.97 15'n 414 37 

Maine 10.18 12.90 2.72 s6 

Maryland 839 1096 2.57 30 

Massachusetts 9.90 11.78 1.88 19 

Michigan 8.92 10.76 1.84 20 

Minnesota 10.15 13.07 2.92 28 

Mississippi 12.69 17.11 4-42 34 

Missouri.... 11.16 14,57 3-41 30 

Montana 21.70 26.73 5-03 23, 

Nebraska 12.02 15.65 3.63 30, 

Nevada 25.78 32-50 6.72 22; 

New Hampshire 8.82 12.33 3-51 4°- 

New Jersey S.45 10.96 2.51 30- 

New York 871 10.76 . 2.05 23 

North Carolina 10.94 M-39 3-45 31 

North Dakota 13.31 17.23 3.92 31 

Ohio 8.35 10.10 r.75 20 

Oregon 15.40 19.54 AM 26 

Pennsylvania 8.27 10.70 2.43 29 

«hodeIsland 9.44 12.13 2.69 28 

South Carolina 1244 15.81 3.37 27 

South Dakota 13.57 18.71 5.14 38 

Tennessee 12.29 16.53 3-24 24 

Texas 13.30 17.14 3.84 29 

Utah 20.87 25.45 4-58 29 

Vermont 984 1307 3.23 32 

Virginia 9.09 1175 2.66 21 

Washington 16.54 21.06 4.52 21 

West Virginia 8.50 11.17 2.67 31 

Wisconsin 9.03 13.71 4.68 51 

Wyoming 18.77 24-58 5.81 30 

It will be observed that the 
smallest percentage of the retail 
dealer's profit is credited to Cali- 
fornia, but there is a net difference 
of 1.29 cents per gallon, or 54^ 
cents per barrel, between what he 
pays for the oil and what he re- 
ceives for it. The greatest profit 
is in Wisconsin, 51 per cent, but 
Idaho dealers are able to realize 
9.72 cents on the gallon, while 
those of Wisconsin make 4.68 
cents. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



A PROMISING COMPANY , 

Work on Well Bcini: Puhod "Sli>ht 
and l>n> . 

The well ot the Bankers and 
ors Oil company, on section 
23, towns'. inset 

the ac- 
now 
down ovei with nine and 

five-eightha casing. Drilling is 
being pushed night and day to 
expedite the work and to com- 
plete the well. The company has 
one of the most complete drilling 
plants in the field. They are now- 
drilling in the blue clay, which is 
a very promising formation, anil 
everything looks very satisfactory. 



Verde conies from Senator Clark's 
wells at Galli and the 

crde company now pays 
$90,000 a month for freight 
charges alone on coal and coke. 
The Old Dominion consumption 
is not nearlv so great, but require 
many thousand tons each year. 
eriments are in progress in 
many other copper plants, includ- 
ing the Shannon property, and 
that of the Detroit Copper com- 
pany in the Clifton district, and it 
is likely that oil will become gen- 
erally used in the operation of 
hundreds of plants, where the 
high freight rates put coal prices 
so bigb that operation is now un- 
profitable. The oil to he used 
will come from Southern Califo r 
nia and Texas, although recen- 
petrolenm discoveries in Ari/.ont 




RAT, VIBW 01 llANKl.RS .v BROKERS on. COMPANY'S I'I.anT. 



not only for getting the well 
down speedily and satisfactorily 
in oil but for the ultimate striking 
of a large gusher in a few days. 

An investment in this company 
should prove satisfactory as it is 
without an element of chance, as 
as there is no doubt about oil of a 
fine quality being struck as the 
property is surrounded by flow- 
ing wells, and the officers of the 
company are trustworthy and ca- 
pable business men. 

Will Use Oil. 

Coal as fuel will be discarded 
and oil substituted at Senator W. 
A. Clark's great United Verde 
mine at Jerome and at the Old 
Dominion mine at Globe, Ariz., 
two of the largest copper pro- 
ducers in the world. For several 
weeks thorough tests have been 
in progress, and oil has proved 
satisfactory at both plants. The 
fuel now used at the United 



lead to the belief that this territory 
may provide its own fuel. 



Pipe Line Burst. 

The pipe line which carries the 
crude oil from the Pennsylvania 
fields to the refineries at Bayonne, 
burst last week on the farm of W. 
F. Hutchinson, two miles south of 
Bound Brook, N.J. The oil flowed 
over the ground for some time 
before the break was found and 
the flow checked. It took half a 
day to repair the break. As soon 
as this was done it was determined 
that the best thing to do was to 
fire the oil, which had spread over 
the ground. Owing to the heavy 
rain it was feared the oil would 
flow into the streams and wells 
and do much damage. Accord- 
ingly, when the break was closed, 
the oil was set on fire. The flames 
shot high into the air and emitted 
a dense black smoke, which could 
be seen for miles. 




OHMEN 
ENGINE 
WORKS 

Steam Engines 
For All Purposes 

321 MISSION ST. 

San Francisco 

Cal. 



000000 000000 000000 00-0000 000000 000000 000000 

The Well-Known Brand of 3 




BOSTON (RASING 




B 



Line Pipe 



b "> Drive Pipe 





B 



Tubing 



As manufactured by the 



NATIONAL TUBE COMPANY 



I For sale by Jobbers of Oil Well Supplies throughout California and I 
A and the Pacific Coast. 6 

O 0-0-000000000 O-OOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 



REFINING OIL 



THE PRINCE OF MONEYMAKERS 



FUEL OIL 



BANKERS 5- BROKERS OIL COMPANY. 



treasury stock now offered 

at the; low trick of 



15 cents per share 



TAR VALUE Jl EACH, FULLY PAID 
AND NON-ASSESSABLE 



1 1 „ ti,ic n„e ha* ever been offered to the public. AN ABSOLUTELY SAFE AND SURE INVESTMENT, combined with practically cei- 

No opportunity equal to ^^^"^f^^^l Jnd proven. The company's flowing wells when brought in ina few days guarantee your ravestnient 

and t™ l sti!V;oon; ^W«Tp^>! theTmpany owns rooo acres iS Sa'n Benito District, famous for high grade refining oil, and lease on 80 acres 

in th MM.^nilfad t, nll is steadilv advancing in price right along and has always a value of several times of what it costs to pro- 
a ,„ ^ AH f f U?e comoany's foldings are fn proven oil belts and are so located that oil can be piped out. The company is n the hands of 
duce it. AH ol the company old ings are ^ P u ; sible that these shares wiU be worth Jro.oo each in one year. 

^Th 1 ^ 1 stock la ^beS purchased by the most conservative" investors, a large block having just been taken by some of the 
most T p?orninenrca\?itaHsts g of P PhHad a e?phia Ld Boston. Buy now and share in the coming : dividends Great fortunes have been and are 
now being made in OIL,. WHY NOT YOU ? Send remittances by usual methods, payable to the order of 

J W HEISNER & CO., Financial Agents, 612 Parrott Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 

References by permission: 'Merchants National Bank, Portland, Or.; Western National Banlt, San Frandsco, Cal. 



OIL PERMITS GRANTED. 

List of persons in San Francisco granted permission 
by the Board of Supervisors to use fuel oil from May 
22nd, 1899 to Nov. 18, 1901: 
A 

American Fuel and Power Company, 130 Main street. 
American Tool Works, 109 Mission street. 
Alcatraz Asphalt Paving Company, 411 Berry street. 
American Steel and Wiie Company, Bay and Mason streets. 
Abrahams, Heunisch Company, corner 15th and Harrison sts. 
American Fuel and Power Company, 130 Main street. 
American Crude Oil Burner, 52 Second street. 



Bowers Rubber Company, 31 Commercial street. 

Bay City Brick Company, Twenty-fourth street and Corbett Road. 

c 

California Glue Works, Sixth avenue and R street, south. 

Central Light and Power Co., Stevenson between 5th and 6th. 

California Street Cable Company, California and Hyde streets. 

Cascade Laundry Company, 175 Tenth street. 

Crocker Estate Company Building, Post and Market streets. 

California and Nevada Ice Company, 356 Tehama street. 

California Fruit Canners' Association, Vanderwater st , nr, Taylor. 

California Fru't Canners' Association, Seventh and Berry streets. 

Consumers' Ice Company, 420 Eighth street. 

California Wine Association, Brannan near Third streets. 

California Saw Wcrks, 212 Mission street. 

California Canneries Company', 423 Brannan street 

George W. Caswell and Company, 415 Sacramento street. 

California School of Mechanical Arts, Potrero Block 96. 

City Street Improvement Company, Mills building. 

California Hotel, Bush street, near Kearny. 

California Woman's Hospital, Sacramento and Lyon streets. 

California French Laundry, 100 Sanchez street. 

D 

Abner Doble Company, corner Fremont and Howard streets. 

Del Monte Milling Company, Stanford street, near Brannan. 

Z. U. Dodge, 2412 Geary street. 

M. H. de Young, Chronicle building. 

Demiug Parlor Milling Company, 109 Commercial street. 

E 

Eureka Laundry Company, 318 Tenth street. 
Enterprise Brewing Company, 2015 Folsom Street. 
Electric Laundry Company, 835 Folsom street. 

F 

Fair Estate, 230 Montgomery street. 

Fairchild and Gilmore, Harrison street, bet. Eighth and Ninth. 
Fulton Engineering and Shipbuilding Works, Harbor View. 
Ferryboats Oakland, San Pablo, Thoroughfare, Transit, Tamalpais. 

G 

D. Ghirardelli Company, Beach and Polk streets. 
Golden Gate Distilling Company, Fillmore and Chestnut streets. 
Golden Gate Compressed Yeast Co., Minnesota, near 24th streets.' 
Golden Gate Woollen Manufacturing Co., 19th and Bryant streets. 
Guggenheim and Company, Filbert and Front streets. 

H 

Hearst Oil Co., Potrero Block No. 271, and Bryant and Main Sts. 

Joshua Hendy Machine Works, Kearny and Bay streets. 

J. Downey Harvey, 410 Mission street. 

Haywards Laundry Company, Haywards, California. 

Independent Electric Light and Power Co., Nievonr. Georgia Sts. 
Independent Electric Light and Power Co., 23rd and Louisiana. 

K 

M. J. Keller & Company, 1028 Market street. 
King Keystone Oil Company, 415 Berry street. 
J. C. Kirkpatrick, (Palace Hotel) Market street. 



Lane Hospital, Webster street, between Clay and Sacramento. 
La Grande Laundry Company, 228 Twelfth street. 
Lachman & Jacobi, Second and Bryant streets. 
Lehallet, Hellwig Tanning Company, Sixth and R. R. avenue. 
G. R. Lucy Company, 123 California street. 

M 

Merchants Ice & Cold Storage Co., Montgomery and Lombard Sts. 
Miller & Lux, First avenue and Kentucky streets. 
Market Street Railway Company, at all engine houses. 



MarU-1 Power Company, 149 Fremont street. 

Merchants Ice and Cold Storage Company, 309 Davis street. 

McPhee Company, Nineteenth and Harrison streets. 

P. McLellan, 652 Fifth street. 

W.J. Martin, 217 Stevenson street. 

Mission Soap and Candle Works, 16 First street. 

Daniel Meyer, 216 Pine street. 

Market Street Railway, storage tank at Page and Brodericks streets 

N 

New England Soap Co., near Santa Clara and Rhode Island streets. 
P. Noble, 17th and Texas streets. 
National Brewery. 762 Fulton street. 
Neustadter Brothers, Sansome and Pine streets. 

o 

Oil Storage and Transportation Co., bet. Sixth and Channel streets. 

Oriel Glass Works, Sansome and Filbert streets. 

Olympic Club, Post street, between Mason and Taylor streets. 

Olympic Salt Water Company, Larkin and Bush streets. 

Oil Fuel Saving Company, 325 Montgomery street. 



Pacific Sheet Metal Works, Seventh and Townsend streets. 

Pacific Oil Supply Company, near Sixth and Channel streets. 

Pacific Power Company, 26 Jessie street. 

Geo. W. Pennington & Sons, Montgomery and Chestnut streets. 

Pacific Oil and Lead Works, King street, bet. Second and Third. 

Henry Pottel, 1303 Courtland avenue. 

Geo. W. Pennington & Sons, 313 Fjlsom street. 

Pacific Refining and Roofing Co., 16th and Mississippi streets. 

Pacific Packing House, Fourth and Shipley streets. 

Presidio and Ferries Railway Company, nil Union street. 

Producers Oil Storage Company, Berry and Seventh streets. 

Pioneer Varnish Company. 

Pacific Coast Biscuit Company, 601 Folsom street. 

Pacific Vinegar and Pickle Works, 415 Fulton street. 

Phelan Building, Market street. 

R 

Risdon Iron Works, Howard and Beale streets. 
Ruffino & Bianchi, 862 Bryant street. 

s 

San Francisco Brick Company, on Flint Tract. 

San Francisco Breweries, Limited, 240 Second street. 

Joseph Scheerer, Brannan, between 10th and Dore streets. 

S. F. and San Joaquin R. R., near Main and Spear streets. 

Standard Oil Company, Seventh street, bet. Irwin and Hubbel st-i 

San Francisco and Pacific Glass Works, Fifteenth and Harrison. 

S. F. Gas and Electro Company, Jessie St., bet. Third and Fourth. 

Spring Valley Water Works, at pumping stations. 

Stauffer Chemical Co., Utah and Alameda, and Bay and Dupont 

Simons Font Brick Company, 18th street and Corbett road. 

San Francisco Candle Company, Rhode Island and Alameda sts. 

Sutter Street R. R. Company, Sutter and Polk streets. 

C. R. Splivalo & Company, 958 Bryant street. 

Southern Pacific Company, Sixteenth street shops. 

San Francisco Savings Union, 532 California street. 

St. Luke's Hospital, Twenty -seventh and Valencia streets. 

F. E. Seidel, n 79 San Bruno Road. 

St. Nicholas Laundry Company, 3076 17th street. 

Steam Schooners Albion, Lindauer, and Olympic 

St. Nicholas Hotel, Market and Hayes streets. 

Standard Shirt Factory, Gough and Grove streets. 

Tugs Hermosa, Prentiss, Richmond, and Vallejo, 



S. F. Timber Preserving Company, 223 Folsom street. 
Emma Spreckels Building, 927 Market street. 
F. Thomas Parisian Dyeing Company, 27 Tenth street. 
Tubbs Cordage Company, at works in Potrero. 

u 

United Oil Producers, Berry street between Sixth and Seventh 
Union Iron Works, works at Potrero. 



Viavi Company, 2304 Van Ness avenue. 
Vermont Marble Company, 244 Brannan street. 
Vallejo Steamer General Frisbie. 

w 

Wilgus Mfg. Company, 52 Natoma street. 

Wunder Brewing Company, near Lombard and Greenwich street 



BBS 



I 



50c 



Asphaltum Refinery 



50c 



A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure 

Gilt-Edged Stock 



Inside of two months this valuable 

We leased land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within " 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, mar famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have just secured 

6000 ACRES 6000 ACRES 

of land that produces untold quantities of asphalt 
near Sargents Station. 



stock will COS! you One Hollar. 

We have concluded conl mils lor the sale of our 
alt at a figure which will enable us to pay divi- 
dends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract carload lots tot cruil 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses ate erected and foundation for Re- 
fining Works is NOW under construction. 

No empty promises, but absolute farts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tills you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned inside 
days. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $20 per ton 
is better than the Trinidad at $35. 



STANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY 

475-476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 



/^/vv^/^/vv^Al^A^^<^A*/**vvvv^/^<^^s*<^*»v^^v^A/\^*«vv^^A*/^A^*A^AA^/«^ 



Choice Oil Land for Sale 

We have been authorized to sell three pieces of land in Section 13, Township 29, Range 28, in that portion of the 

Kern River Oil district known as 

SOUTH OF KERN RIVER 

>.yw,i«, < «..>^.j/yv 

It is all patented land and the title is guaranteed. 

The Chicago Extension is now drilling on the land adjoining, with every prospect of striking oil. 

The Wizard Oil Company is drilling southwest of us. 

The Panorama had 150 feet of oil sand on Section 14, adjoining us, but lost the well. 

The land is only a mile south of Discovery well, where oil was first struck in the Kern River District. 

There is no doubt but that with a proper rig for drilling in the soft formations oil will be struck here at about 1500 feet. 

We will sell this land in a body, or will split it up into three pieces. 

We are able to offer it for a short time only at 



$60 PER ACRE 



This is over 50 per cent lower than any land is offered in this portion of the district. 



EASY TERMS 



EASY TERMS 



For maps and further information apply to 



THE PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



v y VWV yyyyyyyVVVyi// ^ V//^V^///^W»WNV l A^^yVW> 1 



**siV^«**'vvwvv*wvvwvwv**av*vwvv*^vvvwv'wws*/vv 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments In OH In Various Parts 
of the State. 



COLUSA. 

The casing has been pulled from the 
Herron No. 2 well and a new hole has 
been commenced. Accidents have 
spoiled both holes. 

Very little can "be learned concerning 
well No. 3 on the Smith & Gorrill lease 
on Sand Creek aside from the fact that 
the work is being continued. One of 
the drillers is sick and only a single tour 
is worked now. It is supposed the re 
cent caving has been overcome. 

The Colusa Herald of the 26th said 
concerning the Williams well: The Home 
well on the Brim place has reached a 
depth of 1500 feet. Operations have 
been suspended and the machinery is 
undergoing necessary repairs. The re- 
pairs are expected to be completed by 
today or tomorrow and the drilling will 
then be recommenced. More casing is 
to be put in the well soon, and work will 
be pushed with the utmost vigor. 

Negotiations are pending that may 
soon result in an oil well being drilled 
on the land of the Capay Oil company, 
located in the western part of the coun- 
ty. Sacramento capitalists are back of 
it. They have had the land experted 
and are so well pleased with the forma- 
tion and prospects that they are willing 
to risk their money in the venture. The 
final arrangements will soon be perfected 
and it may not be many weeks before 
the drill will be dropping. — Mail of 
Woodland. 

CONTRA COSTA. 
The Clover Leaf Oil Co., raised steam 
on Wednesday last and will sink their 
well 300 feet deeper. It is now down 
1400 feet. They have every assurance 
that they will strike a good producer of 
superior quality at from 1550 to 1700 feet. 

GLENN. 

The Willows Review says the machin- 
ery for the California-Washington Oil 
company, which will operate on the Nye 
ranch, was expected from the East in 
tea days. This will help the develop- 
ment of oil in Glenn county. 

FRESNO. 

The Fresno-San Francisco Oil com- 
pany's No. 1 is down close to 500 feet. 

The California Oil Fields (Lnitd.) now 
has Sve producing wells, three strings 
of tools running. Another well will be 
started soon. 

If the Mt. Hamilton succeeds in get- 
ting a good well at Alcalde, several other 
companies having property in that lo- 
cality will start up. 

Drillers have gone out to the Invest- 
ment to help finish rigging up. It looks 
as if this company would have a string 
of tools running soon. 

The Maine State Oil company is mov- 
ing the rig recently purchased of the 
Star Oil company and will soon be ready 
to commence drilling on No. 4. 

The 2000-barrel tank of the El Capitan 
Oil company, which is at present situ- 
ated below the wells on the south side, 
will be moved to the top of the hill east 
of the wells. 

E. Silverstone, of San Francisco, was 
in Coalinga last week making arrange- 
ments for the erection of a derrick on 
property near the Caribou wells for a 
company in which he is interested. 
This is assessment work. 

Every effort yet made to fish out the 



stem lost in the Echo well in Warthan 
Canyon has failed, and hopes of getting 
it out are given up. An effort will now 
be made to case up the stem by shoving 
it to one side of the well. 

The five inch pipe was pulled from 
Commercial No. 1, and an effort was 
made to put in seven-inch drive-pipe 
without success. The seven-inch pipe 
was taken out and the five-inch again 
put in its place. The well is again drill- 
ing. 

The Philadelphia-San Francisco has 
brought in its No. 1, which is a good 
well. Work has been suspended for a 
short time. No. 2 will probably be 
started by January 1st. No. I is less 
than 700 feet deep and the oil has raised 
over 300 feet. 

Caribou No. 1 has been drilled deeper 
and the production of that well has been 
considerably increased. We could not 
find out how much exactly, but sup- 
pose, from what we did learn, that a 
fifty barrel increase is reasonable to be- 
lieve. Work by this company has been 
suspended for a few days. 

J. H. Larson, who is managing the 
Union Oil company's business in this 
field, is having work on the new pipe 
line pushed through with all possible 
speed. E. L. Curtis, of Sistersville, 
West Virginia, is superintendent of the 
connection force and has made a record 
for pipe laying, as on Saturday of last 
week he layed 210 joints, which is by 
far the best that has ever been doue in 
this field. As soon as this line is com- 
pleted, we understand that Mr. Larson 
will start another line, leading from Sec- 
tion 28 Oil company to the trunk line. 

The Chicago Limited Oil company is 
the name of a company recently formed, 
with headquarters in Chicago, and 
which will operate in this field on 6, 19- 
16, about three or four miles northeast 
of the Caribou. P. E. Daniels, of Chi- 
cago, represents this company, and 
spent Monday and Tuesday of last week 
in Coalinga. He states that the Chi- 
cago Limited will be ready to start drill- 
ing in thirty days and will push things 
vigorously ahead. Mr. Daniels has 
made the oil business a study for some 
time and has spent several years in Cali- 
fornia, Pennsylvania, and other oil 
fields, and offers some very good argu- 
ments concerning the present situation 
of the oil industry in California, and 
why it- will be better soon.— Coalinga 
Derrick. 

KBEN. 

Chicago Guarantee, section 18, 11-24, 1S 
about ready to spud in for its first well. 

Mascot is perforating its second well. 
The drill has been set at work on No. 3. 

Barrett No. 3, section 2, 11-24, has 
been completed into a good producer, 

Monte Cristo expects to spud in on 
hole No. 20 at an early date. No. 19 is 
still flowing a steady stream of oil, 

Illinois Crude No. 2 is down 600 feet 
and has 100 feet of oil sand. Not a drop 
of water has yet been encountered. 

• ■The Defiance Minerals company, 
operating near Poso creek has a fishing 
job on its hand. Two lengths of ilfS 
casing parted near the bottom of the hole 
and it is having difficulty in raising the 
loose parts. 

The Sunset Coast has entered another 
prolific strata of oil sand at the 1235 foot 
level on its holdings, rection 25, 32-23, 



which is said to surpass anything hereto- 
fore found in the Midway district. 

F. A. Waltman has completed the fish- 
ing job on Sunset Diamond, No. 2, and 
is now under reaming the hole. A depth 
of 450 feet had been reached when the 
casing parted and in an effort to pull it 
a spear and a string of tools were lost and 
became covered with clay. Mr. Walt- 
man took the contract to remove the cas- 
ing and tools and to drill deeper. 

LOS ANGELES. 

The Whittier Oil and Develi pment 
company is now nearly 1300 feet with its 
well on section 24. 

The Central Oil company has made 
about 100 feet- in sand on No. 29 and 
theieisan excellent outlook for a good 
well. 

The Whittier-Fillmore company has 
made over 1150 feet on the well being put 
down on the Tubbs-Evans tract. The 
drilling has been unusually hard during 
the past two weeks and progress has been 
slow. 

Contractor Richard McConnell has re- 
sumed operations on the well being put 
down on the Sansenina ranch for the 
Onion Oil company for a few days to 
make repairs on the boiler. He has 
made but little progress during the week 
on the Iwo wells, Nos. 31 and 33, which 
he is drilling for the Central Oil com- 
pany. 

The New England Oil company has 
its well No. 2 down 2000 feet and is 
pumpi ng. Over 300 feet of oil sand were 
encountered and on perforating the well 
flowed. A good producer is assured, 
though it is early to estimate the amount. 
This well is at the extreme eastern end 
of the local field and proves a large area. 

The Whittier Crude Oil company has 
put well No. 1 which has been deepened. 
on the pump and is securing a fine pro- 
duction. The hole is over 1600 feet deep 
and with so large a reservoir it will be 
some da}-s before the steady capacity of 
the well can be determined. On No. 5 
good progress is being made at present, 
although drilling has been suspended for 
several days on account of trouble with 
casing. 

The North Whittier Oil company will 
put well No. 2 on the pump at once in 
order to determine something regarding 
the capacity before carrying the hole 
down further. The well is over 1300 feet 
deep, the last 300 feet in good sand. As 
well No. 1, with only 150 feet of sand, 
started pumping at 15 barrels a day of 22 
gravity oil there is every reason to be- 
lieve that No. 2 will be correspondingly 
better. These two wells have proved up 
a section of territory outside of the 
original Whittier field but they have also 
demonstrated that it is an expensive 
locality to operate. By making unusual 
precautions such as an extra strong der- 
rick and using heavy drive-pipe the com- 
panies has been able to make 1300 feet of 
hole in five months, which is much 
better time than it has taken to drill 
many holes in the proven field. 

SAN BENITO. 

The Twin Cities Oil company with 
place of business at Nevada City, will 
operate soon in the Vallecitos. 

The drillers for the oil wells on the 
Towle farm at Emmett and the Merrill 
ranch at Hernandez arrived at Tres 
Pinos Monday and spudding has begun. 

The derrick for the San Benito Crude 
Oil company has been finished on the 
Towle place near Emmet and the car- 
penters have gone to the Merrill ranch 
near Erie to erect two more. 

The Fresno-Alpha near the Calisloga 
property are down about 1000 feet and 
oil comes up with every bucket. Either 
of the above wells are liable to come in 
at any time. The Ashurst company have 



a fishing job on hand, but they hope the 
delay will be only temporary. 

The Calistoga Oil and Development 
Company are making good headway, 
working one shift in charge of C. V. 
Gormley and Thomas Garside. They 
have the casing down about 1050 feet, 
have passed through red shale and are 
now in an oil-stained sand. As work 
progresses prospects are more encourag- 
ing; good reports from this quarter can 
be looked for at any time. This is the 
deepest well in the Vallecitos District al- 
though they were the last to begin opera- 
tions. 

SAN DIEGO. 

The Cactus Oil Co., is working full 
crew on Carrizo Creek. Captain Barrett 
the Superintendent and President has 
interested Chicago capital, and work will 
be pushed vigorously. All the other 
companies ft re drilling with double crews. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO. 

A portable oil boring outfit was hauled 
out from this point to the Cholame ranch 
last Wednesday. The rig will be put to 
work in a short time boring for oil. Mr. 
Bray will superintend the drilling 
operations. -Mr. Eppinger of this city 
and Mr. Jack of San Luis Obispo are in- 
terested in the promotion of this oil 
development. The surface indications 
are good in the locality where the well is 
to be sunk and it is to be hoped that a 
paying well will be found. — Paso Robles 
Record. 

TEHAMA. 

Mr. VVheelock, one of the stockholders 
in the Corning Oil and Gas company 
came up Thursday afternoon and re- 
turned tu Corning today. He said the 
company's oil well was down 2000 feet 
and at that depth a soft shale and sand 
formation had been struck, and it has 
caved in so rapidly that work on the well 
had to be suspended. The prospect for 
oil he considers better now than at any 
time heretofore. The well will now be 
cased with ten-inch pipe and boring will 
then be resumed. About $19,000 has al- 
ready been spent on the well and more 
money will have to be raised before work 
can go ahead, but Mr. Wheelock thinks 
that if sufficient stock cannot be sold, 
the required amount of money will be 
raised among the principal stockholders. 
—Red Bluff Cause. 

VENTCRA. 

The Alger Cillmore company is still 
fishing for tools. The well is about 500 
feet deep. 

Bardsdale Canyon has moved rig No. 
1 to be used tor well No. 2 near the 
Climax property. 

Bardsdale Crude Oil company have 
struck it again. No. 7 is showing up to 
be a fine producer — big No. 8 is finished. 

The Capitol Crude has let two wells by 
contract and J. E. Sanford has contracts 
for three wells in different parts of the 
field. 

To the west of the Paxton Oil com- 
pany the Olga Ventura company is at 
work, also the Sulphur Petroleum com- 
pany. 

The indications are good for a revival 
of work in the oil fields immediately 
north of town. A syndicate of gentle- 
men who recently disposed of valuable 
oil lands near Bakersfield are negotiating 
for the Mrs. Cooper land in section 35 
with a view to developing it. 

Langdon, Newmark & Rowan are 
drilling north side of Sulphur mcuntain 
near the famous Senator Bard property, 
while the Constitutional company are 
drilling on the South side of Sulphur 
mountain. To the east L. O. Wood is 
drilling on the land acquired from the 
Aquilla company. Ellick Terrel is put- 
ting down a well near the south side of 
the mountain. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NOT ENOUGH CARS. 

Texas OH Producer* Complain as 
Much aa Calltornlantt. 

There is as much of a shortage 
of tank cars in Texas as in Cali 
fornia, and Texas oil producers 
are up in arms about it just as 
much as are Californians. 

This is evident from the follow- 
ing in a recent issue of the Beau- 
mont Enterprise-. 

" A famine of oil cars is upon 
the liquid fuel industry of 
Beaumont is being held up. either 
intentionally or otherwise, the 
question of obtaining tank cars 
has become a game of chance. 
There are various opinions, and 
you may take your choice of them, 
but no difference which is the cor- 
rect one there yet remains the 
stubborn fact that the industry is 
being held up, placed under an 
embargo, made to stand and de- 
liver. The roads claim that they 
have cars ordered, delivery of 
which has been delayed by in- 
dustrial conditions, inability be- 
cause of the late steel strike etc., 
to procure material. The oil sellers 
make a counter claim that at one 
time there was five or six hundred 
tank cars in this service and at 
present not half that number are 
available, that the absentees have 
been withdrawn — that some time 
back it was easier to get cars than 
it is at present, that there is evi- 
dently a lot of tank cars side- 
tracked somewhere or put into 
service elsewhere, that there is 
either negligence existent or a de- 
sire to muzzle the field, either 
slowness in returning empties or 
an intentional effort being made 
to choke the industry to death. 
These are opinions prevalent in 
oil circles and it must be in justice 
said that there is some ground for 
such views. These great railroads 
are like an enemy in battle — when 
cartridges are running low the 
ammunition is sent to the front in 
face of all obstacles, sent quickly, 
sent on the jump, against all ob- 
struction; it may be difficult to 
deliver it to the firing line, but it 
gets there — gets there on time. 
That a railroad company with mil- 
lions of dollars at its command and 
unlimited credit needs six months 
to secure a delivery of a hundred 
tank cars is not credible. That 
these companies should have in 
the past discouraged private 
ownership of tank cars, as is al- 
leged, has a semblance to the 
traditional case of the bug and 
the chip. No explanation is 
needed — tank cars are. Railroads 
never talk for publication hence 
their side of the case will never 
reach the public ear, but if this 
embargo is not raised, this car 
famine not relieved, they will lose 
their case by default and be voted 
guilty by common consent. It 
may be remembered that during 
the recent sitting of the Texas 
railroad commission the roads 
fought reduction in oil rates and 
it is not to be supposed that they 
took their medicine without 
grimacing, as they practically had 
their noses held during the swal- 
lowing of it and that they should 
feel a little sore over it yet is not 
to be wondered at. Further there 
is the hand of the coal man with 
four fingers of it amputated by 
the decision of the commission, 
possibly his penetrating thumb 
has something to do with this — 
maybe he turned it down, as the 
howling Romans did when a fallen 
gladiator had to die. Railroads are 



labyrinthiform. intricate, the ten- 
dons of them ramifying and it is 
not improbable that the coal mines 
are worked by capital furnished 
by the railroads. All these are 
simply opinions that admit of no 
verification, for railroad officials 
are silent as sphinxes — they never 
talk for publication. In case the 
car shortage is not one of inability 
to furnish new cars promptly but 
one of intention to disable the 
field a remedy exists in the rail- 
road commission who will see that 
cars either come on time — or the 
railroads to it. If this shortage is 
a foreordained affair there is a 
way of adjiutinn it by redress, 
damages. If it is DOt intentional 
relief can not be very far off. That 
the roads have discouraged the 
use of private cars, however, pre- 
sumes the existence of a bug 
habiting the nether side of the 
legendary chip. 



Standard Rock Refinery. 

Merrily the work goes on. The 
boarding house is furnished and 
the other houses are ready for 
occupancy. On account of the 
rain the work has been delayed 
for nearly two weeks on the 
foundations for the refining works, 
although the brick and the kettles 
have been on the ground for some 
time. At last on Tuesday the 
sand was hauled to mix the mortar 
and it is but a matter of a few 
days when the works will be in 
readiness for refining the asphal- 
tum from the 6,000 acres on the 
Sargent's ranch. Contracts for. 
crude and refined asphaltum have 
already been made and it is but a 
matter of a very short time when 
dividends on this reliable stock 
will be paid. The shares sell now 
at 50 cents, but it would be ad- 
visable not to wait as the stock of 
the Standard Rock Oil company 
is liable to go to a dollar per 
share inside of thirty to sixty 
days. Even then this valuable 
stock would be very cheap. 



Producer*- oil I \chnn£e 

Thr fell ai 
the Pralucef* 1 the 

id for the wtrck ending 
ber 4: 

a PI 1 I 




1000 at 



1500 at 





CARIBOO. 

75 



40 00 






CALIFORNIA STANDARD. 



-•1 . 



I 1. DORADO. 

IM" III 25 

FOI'K OIL, 

900 at 45 

(WANT. 

looo at 30 

HANFORD. 

2 at 100 00 

4 at 90 00 



AMERICAN, 

STEEL AND WIRE CM'PY 
Pacific Works 

The only Wire Rope Factory on 
the Pacific Coast. 



-\s 00 



405 00 



;.*i 00 



Wire 



We make 
Ropes, Cable and 



Hawsers 



at 97 00 . 
1 at 98 00 . 
io(S90)at 99 00. 
10 at ior 00. 

1 iit 101 25. 



HOMii oil.. 



200 at 3 30. 

ioo(S9o)at 3 30. 

125 at 3 35. 





00 


396 


DO 


97 


in 


98 


111. 


990 


in 


lull) 


00 


ml 


•s 


660 


00 


S3<J 


00 


418 


75 



300 at 



JUNCTION. 

23 

KERN. 



ion at 5 12)4 . 



LION. 



69 00 
512 50 

168 00 

5 25 

120 00 



210) at 08 

75 at 07 

i5oo(B90)at 08 

MONARCH OF ARIZONA. 

200 at 19 38 00 

5oo(S9o)at 18.... : 9000 

700 at 20 140 00 

MONTE CRISTO. 

2oo(B9o)at 1 ^2'/^ 345 00 

300 at 1 65 495 00 

OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 

1250 at 22 275 00 

PETROLEUM CENTER. 



For all purposes and with 
every possible combination 
of Wires, steel and iron, 
galvanized or plain. 



S*^ 



100 at 
iooootBgo) 
100 at 



04. 
05. 
05. 



Kern Shipments. 

Following is the shipment for 
November by days: 



Days. 
I 



Cars. 
.. 96 
. 84 

■ 78 

• 47 

■ 53 
.H7 

63 

■ 58 

. ICO 

■ 67 
.104 

• 79 

• 79 

• 64 
. 80 

Total number 

month, 2,364. 



Days. 
16.... 

17 

18 

19.... 
20 



22. 



23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

of cars for 



Cars. 
-.-• 75 
. . 101 
...80 
...66 
...92 
... 83 
...62 
...80 
■••75 
...100 
•■75 
••75 
...68 
...79 
...84 
the 



REED CRUDE. 

looo(Cash)at 35 

20oo( S90) at 34 

400 at 34 

50o(B 9 o) at 34 



4 00 
500 00 

5 00 



350 00 
680 00 
136 00 
170 00 



SAN JOAQUIN O. & D. 



30 at 
30 at 



7 00. 
7 5°- 



200 at 
ioo'(S9o)at 

350 at 1 20 



STERLING. 
15 



SUPERIOR. 

1000 at 07 

TWENTY-EIGHT 
200 at I 65 



210 00 

225 00 



230 00 
no 00 
420 00 



70 00 



330 00 



♦ 
a 

a 

u 
[1 
p 
□ 
□ 
a 
□ 
a 
□ 
a 

D 
□ 
□ 
D 
□ 

n 
□ 
□ 

D 

a 
a 
□ 

And all fixtures and appliances 
for the use of Wire Rope 

Send your orders to 

American Steel&Wire Co. 

206 North 



Wire Ropes 
Of all Kinds 
For Oil Well 
Purposes 



LOS ANGELES— No. 

Los Angeles St. 
SAN FRANCISCO— No 

Pine St. 



8 & 10 



M, GROSSMAYER. 

CONTRACTOR FOR 

Drilling Oil Wells 




Bakersfield, Cal. 

Room 17, 
1921 Chester Ave 



Shares 32,18 



Amount $12,043 75 M. Grossmayer's Drilling Ou'fit. 



Oil Dividends Paid. 

Following is a list of a few of 
the companies, with the amounts, 
which paid dividends during the 
month of November: 

Central Point Con $3800 

Hanford 2000 

Home 7500 

Oil City Petroleum 2500 

San Joaquin 5 000 

Senator 1810 

West Shore 5°°° 



Fishing Tools 



□ 

n 
n 
n 
□ 

□ 
n 

n 
n 
n 
n 
a 
□ 
□ 
a 
n 
n 
♦ 



We are prepared to ship at once 

to any part of the State all kinds 

of Oil-Well drilling and Fishing 

Tools. 

SPEARS, 

SOCKETS, 

UNDER-REAMERS, 

PERFORATORS, 

RATCHET JACKS, 

RINGS and WEDGES. 

ANYTHING YOU WANT. 



PENNSYLVANIA DRILLING COMPANY 

BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 



12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



RAILROAD COMMISSIONERS. 



Again Order Reduction of Oil 
Rates From Bakersfield. 

The Railroad Commissioners de- 
cided for the second time this week 
that the rates on transportation on 
crude petroleum from the oil dis- 
tricts of the lower San Joaquin val- 
ley to San Francisco are excessive 
and should be reduced. The de- 
cision in the rehearing of the oil 
case was handed down by the 
Commission on Monday and at the 
same time the board adopted an 
order requiring the defendant cor- 
porations, the Southern Pacific 
and Santa Fe, to materially reduce 
their charges, both for the haul 
from Bakersfield to this city and 
for switching on the spuf track 
running out of Bakersfield. The 
reduction on the haul between 
Bakersfield and San Francisco is 
practically the same as that ordered 
on the first hearing of the case, al- 
though made in different form. In 
deciding the case on its first hear- 
ing the Commission did not at- 
tempt to disturb the switching 
charges from Oil City and switch 
17. These charges are cut in two 
by order of the Commission. 

The opinion in the case, written 
by Commissioner Edson and signed 
also by Commissioner Laumeister, 
presents a convincing argument 
that the existing rate yields the 
carriers a wide margin of profit on 
the transportation of crude oil. It 
says: 

Mr. Kruttschnitt testified that it cost 
J2.31 per train mile to haul a train of 
twenty-six cars o the San Joaquin 
division, which he ^.aid was an average 
train on the system, and of these twent}'- 
six cars eight were empties. This 
division includes the Tehachapi moun- 
tains, which is very expensive to operate 
and it is certainly more thau fair if we 
allow them this average from Bakersfield 
to San Francisco, the cheapest part of 
the division to operate. At $2:31 per 
train mile, the distance from Bakersfield 
to San Francisco being 314 miles, the en- 
tire cost of moving a train of twenty-six 
cars between the two places would be 
I725.34- Assuming that the twenty-six 
cars are all loaded one way and returned 
empty $725.34 for moving twenty-six 
cars from Bakersfield to San Francisco 
would be $27.89 per car. Add to this 60 
per cent for the return of the car, which 
would be f 16.73, an d the cost of hauling 
a car loaded one way and returning it 
empty is $44.62, exclusive of switching 
charges. The present rate is $2.58 per 
ton for a car-load of twenty-five tons. 
This amounts to $64.30. Deduct from 
this the $44.62 and it leaves them a net 
profit of $19 88 per car. A profit' of $iq.88 
on an investment of $44.62, the actual 
cost of moving this car both wajs, is a 
profit of 44^ per cent and more than 



half the value of the product delivered 
at the point of destination. 

The order of the commission is 
that on all shipments where the 
distance from point of shipment 
to destination is 100 miles or less 
a maximum rate of 7^ cents per 
100 pounds shall be charged: 
where the distance is over 100 
miles and less than 200 miles a 
maximum rate of g}4 cents per 100 
pounds shall be charged; where 
the distance is over 200 and less 
than 375 miles a maximum rate of 
n 1-3 cents shall be charged, and 
for distances exceeding 375 miles 
an additional charge of 8 mills per 
ton for each additional mile may 
be charged. For the haul over 
the Tehachapi mountains the car- 
riers are allowed to make an ad- 
ditional charge of 9% mills per 
ton per mile. Switching charges, 
which at present amount to about 
$7 and $5 a car from switch 17 and 
Oil City respectively to Bakers- 
field, ire reduced to $3.50 and 
$2.50. This order has the effect 
of reducing the carload rate $10 35 
from Oil City to San Francisco 
and J&1I.35 from switch 17 to San 
Francisco. 

Commissioner Blackstock joined 
in voting for the reduction from 
Bakersfield, but opposed the re- 
duction in switching charges, 
which he thought should not be 
cut down more than one-third. 



A NEW DISTRICT. 

Companies Now Drilling With 
Successful Prospects. 

There are three companies oper- 
ating in the Tejunga country, and 
the land all around has been taken 
up by individuals and companies 
for purposes of oil exploration. 
The Tejunga Oil company has a 
well down 350 feet, the Denver 
Oil company has drilled to a depth 
of 900 feet and the Russian Oil 
company, operating on 22, 3-14, 
has attained a depth of 1000 feet 
with the well it has been drilling. 

According to the Los Angeles 
Herald, the oil that has been ob- 
tained in small quantities is a rich, 
light-green oil, similar in character 
to that being produced in Pico 
canyon, and at 1200 feet the Rus- 
sian company believes it will 
strike the oil in quantity. To date 
the company has expended about 
$16,000, but is sanguine that every 
dollar will be returned with very 
many more dollars in addition. It 
is contended that these three com- 
panies are operating on the main 
lode, which runs from Newhall up 



into the mountains, and as the ex- 
pert who located the wells being 
drilled ? as the same who laid out 
those at Pico canyon, C. L. Calla- 
han, it may be that this will prove 
correct. Be that as it may, all the 
holders of land in the vicinity are 
now awaiting to see whether the 
Russian company will make a big 
strike, and if so there will be lively 
times in the Tejunga. 

The Bard Oil Company, with 
which Senator Bard is identified, 
holds 1200 acres, and the Pacific 
Coast Oil company also has a large 
holding, and in addition to these 
are a number of other companies 
of lesser importance. It is said, 
however, that these companies are 
located merely on stringers from 
the main lode, and that the three 
first comers got the pick of the 
land. Whether the claims that 
have been set up are true or not 
will soon now be determined, and 
until then there are a number of 
landholders who will be on the 
anxious seat. 



Colusa County Wells. 

According to the Arbuckle In- 
dependent the following com- 
panies are now drilling in Colusa 
county: 

Colusa County Oil company — 1. 

Chehalis Oil company — 1. 

Williams Oil company — 1. 

Bear Valley Oil company — 1. 

Herron Oil company — 1. 

Smith & Gorrill— 1. 

Minor Oil company — 1. 

Hammond & Butters company — 
at Gibson spring — 1. 

Total 8. 

Several rigs are on the ground 
and as soon as they become active 
they will be added to the list. 

Several additional companies 
have secured oil land and are 
regularly incorporated, but are 
not selling stock, seemiDg to pre- 
fer to be conservative. 



IT WILL PAY YOU 

to write to P.'O. Box 117, Visalia, 
Cal., before you buy OIL STOCK, 
lease or buy OIL LANDS or Oil 
Casing. 



BUY OR SELL 
CALIFORNIA 

OIL STOCKS 



. . . THROUGH . 



JOSEPH B.TOPLITZ 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange. 
Member California Petroleum Miners' Association. 

330 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Orders for Buying and Selling California Oil Stocks 
Promptly Attended to. 

Reliable information on Oil Stocks Furnished Gratis. 

Unlisted Stocks a specialty. 

Correspondence Solicited. 

Reference — California Safe Deposit & Trust Co., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



For Sale Cheap 
5,(100 (or less) Shares Standard Con. 0. & L.Co. 

Any Reasonable Offer Will Be Accepted 



Fishing Tools 



Fishing Tools 



A full line of fishing tools constantly on hand for rent. Casing speais, casing cutters, swedges, combination slip sockets, slip 
sockets, horn sockets, bu'l dog sockets, under-reamers, rope spears, rope grab, rope sockets, spuds, boot-jacks, fishing jars, subs, 
spiders or ring and wedge, tool wrenches, tool hooks, jar-knockers, elevators, and anything else pertaining to the oil business. 

Bishop Fishing Tool Company 

91 Fremont Street, San Francisco. 

Branches at McKitjrick and Sunset. 



•_•: 



Authentic information furnished regarding corporations operating in the State of California 



S3 

cm 

I 

1 

5 8 * & 

« * to & 

IS $ ^ 

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to f\ wl 

to w *i 

| J AMES R. T. MBR8H0N | 

to /f\ Bg 

I Stock Broker I | 

to >n 52 

to w <* 

it 537=538=539 PARROTT BUILDING $ £ 

to i» gj 

* SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. W & 

to m §j 

S§ to i* ^ 

$ * ■ * 9 

Vl/ « & 

to (ft ^ 

•»• References: San Francisco Banks. ili £q 

to * 3g 

"'* A iittionfiV in fru-tiiof ir*w fnrnictioi-1 rt*cmrr\\ncr rrirnnrQtinnc nnoriifinrT in fTia Gtotn r*C Pnlirnmin •_:• 



^ to /W *v 

Jjy Tjf I have trustworthy data always available. i f\jC 

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gp '*/ Correspondence welcomed. jL CV-5 

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% £ 

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£3 CM 

I I 



H 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



OIL DIRECTORY 

Leading Companies Now Operat- 
ing En California* 



f^AIJSTOGA Oil, AND DEVELOPMENT CO. 

500,000 shares par value $1. 
Operating on 2320 acres located in Napa, Yolo, 
Fresno, San Benito, Monterey and Kern counties. 
Officers: X, D Hitchcock, president; R B Todd, 
vice-president and raauager; B F Edwards, 
secretary; J M Caselman, treasurer; Dr. H G 
Thomas and Dr. E J Boyes. San Francisco 
National Bank, depository. Office, 23 and 24 
Merchants Exchange, San Francisco, Cal. 



flYGNET PETROLEUM CO. 

Capital $150,000 

50,000 shares at $3. 

Location— Fresno county. 

Directors— Chas. L Eair, president, Blitz W Pax- 
ton, vice-president, Chas. A. Lee, treasurer, Johu 
C. McElroy, secretary. 

Office— 561 Parrott Building. 

Tel.— South 184. ^^^ 

pUYAMA. VALLEY OIL COMPANY. 

Capital 1,000,000 

1,000,000 shares at $1.00. 

Location, 80 acres in 4, 9-25 in Santa Barbara 
County and 80 acres in 15, 10-24 m Kern County. 
Incorporated under the laws of South Dakota. 

Directors— W. H. Turner. President; Robt. 
Johnson, Secretary and Treasurer; Andrew 
2hristensen, Frederick Misch, L. M. Hickox; 
Depository, Western National Bank. 

Pacific States Mining & Investment Company, 
fiscal agents. 

Office— 326 Post Street, Sau Francisco. 



D 



.ABNEV OIL COMPANY. 



Incorporated. 
McKittrick district. 16 completed wells; no 
acres proven ground. . 

Office, 330 Pine St., Room 5, San Francisco, Cal. 



p REAT NORTHERN OIL CO. OF OAKLAND 

Capital $250,000 

250,000 shares at $1 

125,000 shares of treasury stock, 

Location of property, Glenn County, Calif,, 2,200 

acres, near Elk Creek, in Stoney Creek Mineral 

district. „ . _ 

Officers, B F Arnold, President, Geo A Gray 
Secretary. 
Office, 476 Teuth street, Oakland, 

OBISPO OIL COMPANY. Capital, $1,000,000. 
Number of shares, r, 000,000. Treasury 
stock, 550,000 shares. All stock fully paid and 
non-asses?able. Incorporated under the laws of 
California. Properties in Kern, Fresno, San 
Benito and San Luis Obispo counties, Cal. In- 
corporators: G R Parkinson, President Bank of 
Palo Alto; Captain Frank Barrett. Palo Alto, Cal.; 
K "W Brown, Fresno. Cal.; Chas E Bond, Minne- 
apolis Minn,; C F Alderson Chicago, 111. Offi- 
cers' John F Giles, president; Frank Barrett, 
vice president; Chas E Bond, treasurer; C F 
Aldeison, secretary, K W Brown, assistant secre- 
tary. Office, Suite 74. Citizens Bank building, 
119-121 La Salle street, Chicago, III, 



OCCIDENTAL OIL COMPANY 
OK WEST VIRGINIA 

Capital stock, 600,000 shares par value, $1.00 

Officers-Win. Crites, president; F M. Graham, 
vice-president; J. B. Batz, treasurer, C. E. Hail- 
stone, secretarv; T. L- Moran, manager; Kern 
Valley Bank, Cal.. depository. 

Mostellar & Allen, San Francisco Agents, 346 
Parrott Bldg. Telephone. Jessie 1683. 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY. Capital stock, 
$2, 850,000; Par value, $1.00. Has 2,000 acres 
in Kern, Los Angeles and Summerland fields, 
with 27 producing wells. Officers aud directors: 
P V Schermerhorn, president; C H Ritchie, vice- 
president; R D Robinson, secretary aud treas- 
urer; D M Schermerhorn and W S Morton. Prin 
cipal office, Potomac building. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Tel. John 2281. 



SALINAS OIL AND DEVELOPMKNT COM- 
PANY. Capital, $1,000,000. 1,000.000 shares 
at $1.00. Land in Momeiey county. Officers and 
directors: President, W N McCarthy. San Fran- 
cisco; vice-president, J J Gunn. Independence; 
treasurer, Wm N McCarthy; secretary. I B Olsen, 
San Francisco; superintendent. Jno C Quinu; C A 
Burchom, J E Baker. N A Dorn, W J Ellis and S 
S Simon, attorney. Hon Eugene F Bert, San Fran 
cis-o Office, room 573-574 Parrott building, San 
Francisco. 



SURETY OIL COMPANY 

Capital $600,000 

600,000 shares par value $1.00 each. 

Location, 240 acres in section 20 and 29 T 3 N R 
16 W, S B M, Los Angeles Couuty, Calif., Nevvhall 
district . 

Officers and, Directors, M Esteruaux, President, 
Geo. Greely King, Vice-President, T. H. Pearne, 
Secretary. D. A. Thieme, M. C. White. 

Farmers and Merchants Banks, depository. 

Office, 102 Henne Block, Los Angeles. Calif. 



S 



TANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 



Capital , $300,000 

Treasury stock $150,000 

Location: 92 acres leased proven oil land in 
McKittrick; 80 acres owned in Coalinga near 
Home Oil company. Fresno; 160 acres owned ad- 
joining oil well in Napa valley. 

Officers: R A Falkeuber^, president; R L Bis- 
by, vice-president; M J Henry, secretary; J G 
Steele, treasurer; F Cooke-Caldwell, attorney for 
company. 

Offices: 475-76 Parrott Building, 85s Market 
street. San Francisco, Cal. 



W* 



ALDORF OIL AND ASPHALT COMPANY. 
Incorporated Feb 25, 1901. Capital, $500,000. 
500,000 shares at $1.00 per share. Place of busi- 
ness, Hanford, Cal. Headquajters at McCord & 
Son. Location of lands, 1.2, o, Guadalupe, Santa 
Barbara county, Cal. Officers and directors: Geo 
B McCord. president, Hanford: Dr N P Duncan, 
vice-president, Hanford; J O Hickman, treas- 
urer, Hanford; Wm M Madden, attorney for com- 
pany. San Francisco; W H Worswick. field super- 
intendent. Hanford; F Brader. Hanford, N Weis- 
baum, Hanford. LS Chittenden, Hanford, W H 
Worswick. Jr, Hanford. Jas Manasse, secretary. 



ARIZONA INCORPORATIONS 



We make a specialty of chartering Ari- 
zona Corporations. Arizona has the 
most liberal laws in the United States- 
no taxes to pay, stock made non-assess- 
able, no personal liability for corporate 
debts. 

We take stock for cur service, if you de- 
sire. We save you one-half the fees 
charged by others, and help you pro- 
mote your enterprise. We give you a 
certificate *hat you are duly incorpor- 
ated. AU business attended to by an 
expert corporation lawyer. Correspond- 
ence solicited. 



THE WESTERN INVESTMENT CO 

Rooms 1 and 3, Porter Block 
PHOENIX - - ARIZONA 



For Lease 



Twenty acres of absolutely proven oil 
land in .McKittrick district to lease on 
royalty basis for development work. 
Chance for good, responsible driller. 
Securities required. 

For further particulars, address, 

W. G. KERCKHOFF 

Wilcox Block, Los Angeles. 



I 



Oil Prospectuses 

Booklets, Stock Certificates, Letterheads, Envelopes, Dodgers, £ 

Letter Circulars, etc., £ 

J Printed at short notice and at reasonable prices. !J 

I Pacific Oil Reporter Job Office $ 

I Rooms 31, 32 and 33 | 

I 318 Pine Street, San Francisco f 

I c 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wrench F 



bits in drilling stem boxes 




Djilllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND "MONEY SAVED. 
It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits. 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares' 
to suit different size bits. 



-MANDFACTDEED BY- 



J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



COPEK.IOR OIL, COMPANY. 

Capital stock, 500,000 shares, par value $1 each 

5960 acres ofl »Ld in the Sunset and McKittrick 
district. 

Two Standard rigs operating at present time. 

Officers and Directors— R S Aston, president; 
W Dixon, vice-president; J W Crosland, secretary 
and treasurer. Win. M Lauuess, W W Kelly aud 
W G Wallace. Attorney, C C Cowgill. Office, No. 
i7Galtes block. Bakersfield. Cal 



SUNSET 
LIMITED 



One of the most magnificent trains 
ever built. For 1901-1902 TRi-WEEKI/y 
via Coast Line and Sunset Route for 

NEW ORLEANS and 

NEW YORK 

Leave SAN FRANCISCO 4:50 p. rn. 
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays. 

Leave LOS ANGELES 8:30 p. 111. 
Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays. 

Arrive NEW ORLEANS 7:20 p. m. 
Thursdays, Saturdays, Mondays. 

Among the world's noted Highways of 
Travel not one equals the route of this 
train. Get the little book, " Wayside 
Notes," from any agent of the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Initial trip of Sunset Limited 
Friday, Dec. 6, from San Francisco. 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Oil Well Casing Oil Stills 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets. P. O. liox 231 

Telephone, Main 196. Baker Block. station C 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Lcs Angeles, Cal. 



U. 



S. OIL AND MINING CO. 



Capital $300,000 

Par value. $i per share. 

Location: 320 acres in Kern River District, 160 
ru'irs 111 section 27, 11-24 Sunset district, near Blod- 
gttt & Jewett wells, 110 acres on fraction 26, 12-24, 
near Monarch, adjoining Jewett, Blodgett & Real 
gusher. L- M. Underwood, president, K Ketelhut 
sec l tary. 

Office— 211 19th street, Bakersfield.lCal, 



Oil Stocks 

Sold in New York and all Eastern 
Markets. Oil, copper and gold com- 
panies financed. 

Hillyer, Clarke & Co.. 

Bankers and Brokers, 
52 Broadway, New York. 




Business College and 
School of Engineering 



24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

THE CIVIL ENGINEERING COURSE includes Geometry, Trigonometry, Draughting 
Strength of Matenals, and Surveying. 

THE MINING ENGINEERING COURSE includes Assaying, Blow Pipe Analysis. Mill Con- 
struction, Milling. Mining. Geology, Mineralogy, Economic Geology, Surveying and Mathematics. 

ELECTRICAL AND ENGINEERING COURSE Electrical Engineering, Theoretical and 
ractical, Work Shop and Laboratory Practice. Construction, Mechanical Drawing, Mathematics etc 

THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT of this College affords unexcelled opportunities for 
the acquisition of a business education. Day and Evening Classes. 

BgrWrite ion new 80-page Catalogue and College Journal. 




For prices, etc, inquire 



W. FORME 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil & Gas Well Rig Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San 
Francisco, Cal,, Bakersfield, Cal. 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pomps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Qrane co. 

H. T. LALLY, Manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. ) 

24 FREMONT ST. J 

San Francisco, Cal 



WONDERFUL SUCCESS " 




Smith=Premier £ 
Typewriters 5 

Are Used Everywhere 

READ 'fiJIS LIST: 
Heald's Business College use 30 
Southern Pacihc Co. system . .47 

Western Onion Tel. Co 36 

S. F. Public Schools now use. . .43 

S. F.Call * ...21 

Hale Bros " .... 14 

Viavi Co " '3 

Cogswell College ' 11 

Miller, Scott & Sloss . " .... 10 

Get information from us about 
the new SPEED Device. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

1 10 Montgomery St., S. F. 



AMERICAN TOOL WORKS a. s cooper, c. l, i e. 

JOSEPH EASTWOOD, Proprietor. 219 Crocker Bulldlug 

MANIFACTIRRRS OF 8AM FRANCISCO 

Standard and Special Drilling Tools 



All Sizes of Casing Spears for Rent. 

109=111 Mission Street, 

Bet. Spear and Main 

Telephone, Main 5578. 



Patent 
Redwood 



OIL TANKS 




42 feet diameter. 18 feet high. Capacity, 177,500 gallons. 



Atlas Pipe Wrench^C 

Received highest award at Pan-American Kxposilion, Buffal ■, N. Y., 1901. 



IT HAS 
NO EQUAL 




NO THREADS 
TO STRIP 



Made in four sizes — 10, iS, 24 and 36 inches. 

Atlas Tube Cleaner 

Received highest award at Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, N. Y., igoi, 



For Water-tube 
Boilers 




It Has No 
Equal 



DnnnnDDaDrjDnaoannunrjrJDnnaD 

D Q 

g Before buying Oil Stock or g 

n leasing or buying Oil Lands n 

g call on A. BARIEAU, Room § 

g 23 Columbian Building, 916° 

n Market Street, San Francisco a 
a n 

rnqnnDnaannnpDPnnnnnannnnnn 



Write for circulars. Ask your supsjdy man. 



Manufactured by 

ATLAS PIPEWRENC 00. Fteod L"™fe 

New York Office, 121 Liberty Sf 



San Francisco. 
Works, New Haven, Conn. 



SPECIALTIES 

Petroleum Oil, Aspbaltum and 
kindred hydrocarbons 



A. ZELLERBACfl & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 

Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
1 incidental to the trade. 



We carry the largest alock. Our price, .re 
Bquitable. 

Tel. Main. 1133. 



When you want to swear go to 

LEE D. CRAIG 

Notary Public and 
Commissioner of Deeds 



316 Montgomery St. 

bet. California 

and Pine, San Francisco. 



The Road to Wealth 

Headquarters School and Governmen 
Lands. 

Lands all counties in California. No conditions 
on School Lands as to residence or cultivation 
Only $1.25 an acre. Locates in all Mineral Belt. 
—Kern River, McKittrick, Devil's Den, Mojave. 
Sunset, Uoalinga and other famous districts. The 
Cheapest Safest and Surest Investment in Amer- 
ca. Send Stamp for Land Book. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, California. 

400,006 Shares of Oil Stock 



DIVIDENDS. 

Dividend No. i was declared by the Ventura 
Consolidated Crude Oil Company Nov. 15th. 
Regular dividends will be paid quarterly here- 
after. Company has 4 producing wells No. 5 
drilling; 2720 acres of oil land; also rich gold mine 
in Arizona. To continue- rapid development 
work a block of treasury stock is being sold at 
20 cents per share, par value, Ji.oo. — Full paid— 
Non-assessable. Reliable agent wanted. Ad- 
dress all orders for stock or further particulars to 

W. G. YOUNG & CO., 

Fiscal Agents. 
628-30 Laughlin Bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 



The Star Drilling Machine 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of inachin 
oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 
ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. 




Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 



The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a lim't of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 
recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are simple, 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in evety State and Territory 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO. 




Austin's Standard Portable Driller 

Made in sizes to suit territory 

Standard Drilling and Fishing Tools 



SIMPLE POWERFUL EFFECTIVE 

CASING : r TUBING 
DRIVE AND LINE PIPE 



GEORGE H, TAY COMPANY, 49 to 53 First Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Not Quantity of Land but Quality 

SILVER STAR OIL COMPANY 



Capital Stock 300,000 Shares 



Par Value $1.00 per Share 



THE LAND OP THIS COMPANY comprises the SE quarter of the NW quarter of Section 28, Township 30 S., Range 22 E. This property is directly in line of pro- 
duction and within one-quarter of a mile of the famous Dabney wells, and land that cannot be purchased for less.than $20,000 per acre, and only 1 mile from the S. P. 
R. R. station at McKittrick. Immense deposits of asphaltum are found on this land, as well as numerous seepages of oil and live oil s^uld on the surface. There can 
scarcely be a doubt as to the enormous value of this land, but the drill alone will tell 
WORK HAS COMMENCED Well No. 1 is now almost completed and is in oil. 
FOR A SHORT TIME ONLY a limited quantity of stock in this company is offered at 25 CENTS PER SHARE. Write for Prospectus to the 

Silver Star Oil Co., 607=608 Safe Deposit Building, San Francisco 

PLEASB MENTION THB PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 




Harron, Riqkard & McCone 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAK. BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 

21 and 23 FREMONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



OIL WELL DRILLING MACHINERY 

TOOLS AND SUPPLIES 

ENGINES, BOILERS, PUMPS, ETC. 

BOSTON CASING 

FISHING TOOLS FOR RENT 

Prompt' Delivery. Correspondence Solicited. 

Agents for STAR Portable Drilling Macliin s 

■ 



Endorsed by the California Petroleum miners' Association- 




December ist. 1901, San Francisco had ONE TELEPHONE to every 12 people. 
January ist. 1901* St, Petersburg, (Russia), had one telephone to every 283 people. 



BS3 



1 



Vienna, (Austria), 
London, (England), 
Philadelphia, (Pa.), 
Paris, (France), 
Chicago, (111.), 
New York City, 
Stockholm, (Sweden), 



had one telephone to every 120 people, 
had one telephone to every in people, 
had one telephone to every 96 people, 
had one telephone to every 82 people, 
had one telephone to every 64 people, 
had one telephone to every 49 people, 
had one telephone to every 13 people. 



DURING 1902 WE HOPE TO PLACE A TELEPHONE IN 
EVERY HOUSEHOLD IN SAN FRANCISCO 



m 



Pacific States Telephone and Telegraph Company 

216 BUSH STREET, San Francisco 






1 



1 



.11 

m 
m 

m 
m 
m 
m 

MfflMi 

$& 

M 

m 

is 

n 



s 
as 

l 
U 

m 



■ 

m 

Mas 






$100 BUYS 

200 SHARES 
OIL STOCKS 

In Ai Oil Company; 200 barrel well. Stock sold in lots 
of $100 and up. Guaranteed against loss by 

Security Gold Bond 

Indorsed by a Trust Company of $1,000,000 paid up capi- 
tal. Cash returned at maturity of bond. Safe, legitimate. 
Investigate. Stock shares in all dividends and profits 
Handsome illustrated booklets of oil fields, with official 
map, for 10 cents in stamps. 

ILLINOIS OIL BOND COMPANY 

Room 506, 167 Dearborn Street, Chicogo. 

Home Office, Room 7, first floor, Mills Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



1 



THE BEST CASING PULLER 



The Norton Ratchet Jack 

With Ring and Slips for Pulling 
Casing. 



ALWAYS SAFE, READY AND EFFECTIVE 



i 






This jack is self lubricating, pro- 
vided with ball bearings, giving 
maximum of efficiency with mini- 
mum of friction. No blocking re- 
quired, as the hold of the ling and 
slips is absolute. Convenient to 
operate, light and durable. For 
prices and particulars address 

M. G. WEST, 216 California Street, San Francisco. 




Bovaird & Seyfang Mfg Co. 



■ MANUFACTURERS OF • 



Stationary and Portable Boilers, Steam Engines, 

Iron Tanks, Rig Iron Outfits, Drilling and Fish ng Tools, 

And everything needed to drill and operate 



Oil, Gas and Artesian Wells 

Manufacturers' Agents for Tubing, Casing, Pipe Fittings, Valves, Etc. 

Natural Gas Plants a Specialty. 

Cable address, "Boang." ABC and Private Codes. 

BRADFORD, PA., U. S- A- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 3. No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAI*. FRIDAY tIBBR 131001. 



Prk 






A NEW OIL DISTRICT. 

In 



The derrick rises from the miilst 
.» forest of rc 
giant branches shade the stream 
/Mateo that is always purling merrily. 
The best way to reach the \ 
is to leave the train at R 
A Beautiful Region In the Redwoods Where the Drill is and then take a team over the 



Active Development Work 

County. 



Son 



Now Dropping With Every Prospect 
oT Striking Oil. 



I'nless all s'gns fail, and all oil 
indications prove deceptive San 

11 county will soon be num- 
bered among the large oil-produc- 
ing counties of California. 

The existence of oil in this por- 
tion of the state does not have to 
be proved. The oil seepages are 
abundant, and in very many 
places, especially along the creeks, 
oil can be seen issuing from the 
banks and floating on the surface 
of the water. 

This oil is of a high gravity, and 
Is In demand for illuminating and 
lubricating purposes. 

Several shallow wells have been 
sunk, and in every instance these 
shallow wells have yielded oil of a 
quality that is in demand not only 
for fuel but for light and lubri- 
cating purposes, and which gives 
it a value far in excess of that 
produced in sections which yield 
an oil fit only for fuel. 

The San Mateo oil fields are 
located on the great peninsula 
which is bounded on the east by 
the Bay of San Francisco and on 
the west by the Pacific Ocean. 

On this peninsula, on the eastern 
side, are located some of the best 
known and most favored residence 
sections of the state, and here are 
found such popular and high-class 
residence communities as Bur- 
lingame, San Mateo, Redwood, 
and the like. In this same belt 
are located the famous Stanford 
University and numerous schools 
for boys such as Belmont. Hoit's 



and others. Along the center of 
the peninsula extends a high 
range of hills, or rather mountains, 
en the western slope of which rise 
the great forests of redwoods, in 
which are sheltered the green and 
velvety pastures which have made 
this district so popular with tourists 
and pienicers, and with those who 
delight in driving along roads 



hills into the oil district. The 
ride is only about twenty miles, 
and seems much shorter on account 

of the many beautiful vistas Ih. I 
are constantly opening 
commodations can be obtained at 
La Honda, 01 at the Bell ranch 
on which the derrick is erected 

The plant built by the San Mateo 
County 'Oil Company is most sub 
stantial and complete. Nothing is 
lacking in the way of niacin 
or tools. On Saturday of last week 




DERRICK OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY OIL COMPANY AMID THE REDWOODS 

sheltered from teat and rain by 
giant redwoods; where trout fre- 



quent the laughing pools, where 
quail whirr through the brush and 
deer speed through the glades. 

It is in this beautiful redwood 
district that abundant oil indica- 
tions are found, and where the 
San Mateo County Oil Company is 
already drilling its first well. 




THE DIRLLING CREW 



drilling had been going on for a 
little over a week, and in that time 
a depth of over 200 feet had been 
made. At the 40-foot level the 
drill encountered a considerable 
seepage of oil which proved con- 
clusively that the main body of 
oil could not be far away. 

But beyond the development in 
the neighborhood and the fact 
that other companies are about to 
begin drilling there, and better 
than the opinions of experts, is 
the evidence of oil which is found 
right on the company's land. 



ud of the 
is a well, drill 

At that time 1 little 

oil in the well and it was not 

d that enough oil could be 
ned from that well to pi 
production. But since that time 
the quantity of oil in the well has 
increased until at present a con- 
stant stream of oil and water flows 
from the well. It is probable that 
in time the company will utilize 
this oil, unless it be found that 
the stream of water which flows 
along the northeastern boundary 
of the company's lands, is of 
sufficient volume to furnish the 
I required for drilling. In 
either event the company will be 
at little or no expense for power 
nr water, a fact which is of much 
importance when it is remembered 
that in some of the interior fields 
fuel and water have cost as much 
as $30 per day. 

Aside from the high grade oil 
and cheap power, advantages in 
themselves attractive enough for 
my oil man, the San MateoCounty 
Oil Company possesses another 
and perhaps more important ad- 
vantage. It is this: within four 
miles of the company's lands is 
the Pacific Ocean. It is nature's 
highway, free to all. No man 
makes rates for its use and no man 
controls it. A pipe line to the 
Pacific will bring this company's 
■ ill to a tank steamer which will 
transport it to San Francisco, 
thirty-five miles away, for less 
than 8 cents per barrel. Bakers- 
field pays 46 cents per barrel to 
transport its oil to San Francisco, 
and frequently Bakersfield finds 
itself with a scarcity of cars. But 
uo man can cry scarcity of cars 
here. The company has no need 
of cars and one tank steamer will 
transport as much oil as can be 
hauled by a train of cars. 

The personnel of the board of 
directors, is eminently satisfactory, 
including as it does some of the 
most prominent and influential 
business and professional men of 
(Conclusion on 7th page.) 




UNLOADING CASING 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



OPERATIONS IN KERN COUNTY. 



Development Work Going On and Everyone 

Hopeful. 



Thirty Immense Oil Tanks Now Completed by the 

Standard— The Los Angeles Herald Scored 

For Its Erroneous Statements. 



The general impression among 
oil men at Bakersfield now is that 
the combine is " busted." They 
do not expect to hear much more 
about it. With the exception of 
the Brooks companies none of the 
companies currently reported to 
be "in" the combine have ad- 
vertised a meeting of the stock- 
holders to consider the question 
of selling to the combine, as is re 
quired by law. As it is now too 
late to do so in order to launch 
the " octopus" by the first of the 
year, the opinion is quite generally 
expressed that it is all off with 
the scheme. Of course, there is 
still a chance, but at no time have 
old experienced oil men thought 
that the proposition was legitimate 
enough to command very serious 
attention on the partol companies 
having valuable properties. The 
air castle was built on moving 
iand and from the incipiency of 
the thing the formation has been 
slipping and sinking away. Pub- 
lic sentiment is all awry if the 
jig is not up and the bun off with 
the whole project. Even those 
who were deepest into the scheme 
make no bones now of expressing 
their doubts. Its an old, old story 
told in a new way in a new field, 
and yet we would refrain from 
saying, " I told you so." 

GAVE BUSINHSS A BLACK EYE. 

The agitation, however, has 
done much to give business in 
Bakersfield a black eye. Many 
companies which would have gone 
on with development work have 
been resting on their oars waiting 
to see what would happen. 
Many who would have commenced 
new work have been constrained 
by the prevailing conditions to 
refrain from entering where the 
oil angels fear to tread. Business 
generally in the town has suffered 
and hundreds who might other- 
wise have spent the winter here 
have returned East. As a result 
the people are sore. 

TALK OF ANOTHER COMBINE. 

There is now talk of another 
combine on an entirely different 
plan. The scheme is tor pro- 
ducers to pool their interests as 
the raisin men do, without parting 
relationship with their property. 
The associated combiners aimed 
to divorce the producer and his 
property, while the last schemers 
would make the union more bind- 
ing. They believe what the law 
has created let no promoting 



seducer put asunder. But it is 
doubtful if this effort will be any 
more successful than the former, 
or for that matter than the attempt 
was in Los Angeles or in any of 
the Eastern fields. The new com- 
biners do not propose to erect 
storage tanks or build a pipe line. 
They expect to act as selling 
agents for all the producers in the 
field. If the production exceeds 
the demand, then each producer 
"'ill be required to lessen his 
pioduction pro rata. Those 
employed to look after the actual 
business would be the only ones 
who would receive a salary. This 
scheme seems plausible enough 
and would no doubt succeed if 
once properly launched providing 
every one had confidence in every- 
one else, and everyone was worthy 
of confidence. Yet there are those 
"ifs and "buts," and they will not 
blot out. 

OIL MEN HOPEFUL. 

One of the best features of the 
situation in the Kern River dis- 
trict is the hopefulness of the oil 
men in general. In this respect 
there is a striking contrast be- 
tween Bakersfield and Los An- 
geles. Here the oil men look the 
situation calmly in the face, and 
philosophically remark that "it 
had to come," and "it will all 
come out right after awhile." 
Very few of the lessees are pump- 
ing all of their wells, but many 
are considering the matter of 
starting up again soon, believing 
that matters will aright themselves 
as soon as the combine muddle is 
definitely settled. 

STANDARD COMPLETES THIRTY 
TANKS. 

The Standard Oil Company 
now has its thirtieth tank nearly 
finished, and all are being filled. 
It is announced that the Standard 
proposes to erect one hundred of 
these immense receptacles and 
whether the report is true or not 
grading for others goes steadily 
on. The fact that twice as many 
are now up as was thought at 
first would be built and the further 
fact that work is progressing more 
rapidly now than heretofore, leads 
the onlooker to believe that there 
is color in the report. With one 
hundred of these tanks the Stand- 
ard will have a storage capacity 
here of three and a half million 
barrels. It is said that an equal 
number will be built at Port Rich- 
mond, which is questionable, but 



leads producers to speculate on 
the probability of piping their oil 
to the coast if the Standard be- 
comes a common carrier. It is all 
new to most of the producers in 
Kern county and being unac- 
quainted with Standard customs 
and practices they are amusing 
themselves conjecturing. But as 
they all firmly believe so verily it 
will be that the. whole difficulty 
will adjust itself in time. It will 
no doubt be eighteen months be- 
fore the pipe line to the coast is 
laid and until then there will be 
little changes. The people have 
come to believe and accept this. 

LAUGH AT LOS ANGELES HERALD. 

But the situation is not without 
its humorous side. This part is 
furnished by the Los Angeles 
Herald in its so-called monthly oil 
report. According to the Herald's 
report issued on Monday of this 
week there are forty-one rigs and 
ninety-nine drilling wells in the 
Kern River field. We had oc- 
casion to remark some time ago 
that statistics to be of any value 
whatever must be at least approxi- 
mately correct, but anyone who 
knows an iota about the Kern 
River field knows at once that the 
Herald's figures do not so much 
as approach approximativness. 
Even a blind man could drive 
through the field and make a 
better report. The Herald has 
fallen into the bad habit of carry- 
ing on from month to month its 
"suspensions," instead of drop- 
ping them after once reporting 
that such has been the result of 
the venture. Why not, on the 
same principle, continue month 
after month to report completed 
wells. It would have the same 
effect of making the report "look 
good." But that is not the object 
of an oil report. If it coes not 
represent actual operations of each 
month it loses its value. Such a 
report as that gotten out by the 
Herald on Monday is a farce. 
Here is the Herald's report: 

KERN RIVER FIELD. 

io, 27-27, Gt. Eastern, No. 1 drg 

29, 27-27, New Hope, No. 1 drg 

12, 28-27, Empire, No. 1 susp 

Kern Center, No. 1 drg 

Valley View, No. 1 . . . susp 

13, 28-27, Florence, No. 1 rig 

23, 28-27, Karl Brown, No. 1 susp 

24, 28-27, Palo Alto O. D., No. 1 drg 

Cantua, No. 2 susp 

25, 28-27, Kopje, No. 1 , drg 

Providential, No. 1 susp 

Vanderlip, No. 2 drg 

Kern Canyon No. 1 . . . susp 

Kern Canyon, No. 2... . susp 

36, 28 27, Hart Crude, No. 3 rig 

12, 27 28, Defiance Mineral, No. r drg 

Clyde, No. 1 susp 

Diamond Jubilee, No. 1 drg 

Expansion, No. 1 drg 

32, 2728, Commonwealth, No. 1. drg 

7, 2S-28, Gray Gander, No. 2. . . susp 

McFadyen, No. 1 susp 

8, 28-28, Petroleum Center, No. 6 rig 

18, 28-28, Emerald Jsle, No. I. . . rig 

Petroleum Dev., No. 32. rig 

Thistle, No. 1 surp 

Minnehaha, No. 3 drg 

19, 2S-28, Cal. Crude No. 1 drg 

Mecca, No. 1 320 

Quai tz, No. 1 . . drg 

Standard, No. 2. Com. drg 

Sonnemahoning, No. 1. drg 

Olema, No. 2 1200 

Banner, No. 1 drg 

20, 28-28, Bunker Hill, No. 2. susp 

24, 28-28, Equality, 

No. 1 sand 

28, 28- 28, British-Cal., No. 5 drg 

British-Cal, No. 6 drg 



Iris, No. 2 rig 

Loma Vista, No. 1 . . . . drg 

Linda Vista, No. 3.... drg 

Vernon, No. 4 drg 

Vernon, No. 5 drg 

Mecca, No. 3 850 

Mecca, No. 4 drg 

Mecca, No. 5 rig 

Vesuvius, No, 2 drg 

Alva, No. 2 drg 

Transcontinental, No. 2 drg 

Illinois Crude, No. 2. . . drg 

Perseus, No. 1 drg 

Perseus, No. 2 rig 

29, 2S-28, Potomac, No. 7 775 

Canfield, No. — rig 

Alma, No. — rig 

30, 28-28, Falcon, No. 2 drg 

Nevada, No 8 drg 

Toltec, No. 3 rig 

Toltec, No. 4 rig 

Toltec, No. 5 rig 

Toltec, No. 8 rig 

Toltec. No. 9 rig 

Hawkeye, No. 2 drg 

Hawkeye, No. 3 drg 

Indiana, No. 1 drg 

Mt. Diablo, No.— rig 

Mt. Diablo, No. — rig 

Chicago Crude, No. 7. . drg 

Chicago Crude, No. 8. drg 

Chicago Crude, No. 9. rig 

Chicago Crude, No. lb. rig 

Irma, No. 1 drg 

Orienr, No. 2 sand 

Orient, No. 3 drg 

Kern Oil & Dev., No. 2. drg 

Columbia, No. 4 drg 

31, 28-28, Green & Whittier, No. 1. drg 

Clarence, No. 2 drg 

Sycamore, No. 3 ...... susp 

M.M. Grossmayer No. 1 rig 

Senator, No. 1 rig 

Queen Esther, No. 1 . . . drg 

Peerless, No. — susp 

Peerless, No. 12 drg 

Peerless, No. 13 drg 

Peerless, No. 14 drg 

Peerless, No. 15 drg 

Peerless, No. 16 rig 

Peerless, No. 17 rig 

Peerless, No. 18 rig 

Peerless, No. 19 rig 

Peerless, No. 20 . rig 

Peerless, No. 21 rig 

33, 28-28, Imperial, No. 13 rig 

Imperial, No. 15 rig 

Thirty-three, No. 18.... drg 

Thirty-three, No. 19.... drg 

Thirty-three, No. 20 rig 

Thirty-three, No. 21.... rig 

Thirty-three, No. 22 rig 

Thirty-three, No. 23.... rig 

3, 29-28, S. P. R. R., No. 36 drg 

S. P. R. R., No. 37 drg 

S. P. R. R, No. 38. ... rig 

S. P. R. R., No. 39.... rig 

S. P. P. R., No. 40 rig 

S. P. R. R., No. 41 rig 

4, 29-28, Red Bank, No. 9 drg 

Cold Stand., No. 3 susp 

Blackjack, No. 6 drg 

Apollo, No. 6 drg 

Alma, No. 5 drg 

Alma, Jr., No. 3 drg 

Nob Hill, N . 7 drg 

Nob Hill, No. 8 drg 

Revenue, No. 7 drg 

Wolverine, No. 4 drg 

Petroleum Dev., No. 7.. drg 

Petroleum Dev. No. 8. . drg 

Jacalitas, No. 2 sand 

Mercedes, No. 5 drd 

5, 29-28, Eclipse, No. 1 drg 

Del Rey, No. 5 sang 

Del Rey, No. 6 rig 

Monte Cristo, No. 20. .. rig 

Monte Cristo, No. 21. . . rig 

7, 29-28, Bennett & Co., No. t. . . drg 

8, 29-28, Cal. Crude, No. I drg 

Eucinal, No. 1 susp 

York Syndicate, No. 1. sand 

Con. Crude, No. 1 susp 

Yankee Girl, No. 1 rig 

11, 29-28, Spring, No. 3 drg 

14, 29-28, Midnight, No. 2 rig 

15, 29-28, Kern King, No. 1 susp 

24, 29-28, San Ardo, No. 1 drg 

Panorama, No. 2 drg 

26, 29-2S, Wizard, No. 1 1200 

24, 32-28, King's County, No. 1. . drg 

3, 30-30, Federal, No. 1 drg 

Rigs 41 

Wells drilling 99 

Total 140 

THE REPORT ANALYZED. 

Now let us analyze it. The 
Great Eastern, New Hope, Empire, 
Valley View, Karl Brown, Flor- 
ence, Palo Alto, Cantua have 
been carried by the Herald for at 
least six months, and operations 
have long since been suspended on 
all of them. Palo Alto never 
started the drill and the Cantua 



hasn't even a derrick. The Kern 
Canyon has not done an 
since last spring, neither has the 
Clyde or the Gray Gander or the 
McFadyen. The Commonwealth 
shut clown .several months ago. 
The Thistle ought to have been 
dropped in the dim past. The 
Banner which is reported as drill- 
ing has not yet drilled a foot, but 
will commence soon. The Banket 
Hill and the Equality have no 
business in the December report. 
The Vernon is not doing anything. 
The Mecca on 28 had its 3 and 4 
finished before the Herald's re- 
port had come cut and had 
up to 19 and was down 320 feet on 
a new location. The Alva well 
reported drilling has been finished 
at least six week- 9 the 

line the Per-eus was reported to 
be drilling No. 1, No. 2 rig. No. 1 
was completed on Oct. 7. 
was Gnishedin November, and No. 
3 is now down over 9-0 feet. 
Transcontinental No. 2 was finished 
twe months ago. Potomac was re- 
ported drilling No. 7. The Potomac 
was drilling Nos. 27 and 28. Can- 
field Oil company has had three 
rigs up for nearly six months. The 
Toltec was reported to have five 
rigs up. Supt. Alexandersays the 
company has just one rig and that 
has been up for nearly a year. 
The Indiana Oil company reported 
to be drilling No. 1, aredrilling No. 
2. The Chicago Crude No. 7 was 
drilled months ago, according to 
the superintendent. No. 8 is an 
abandoned hole, No. 9 was com- 
pleted six weeks ago. No. 10 was 
drilled in October and No. 1 is 
fishing at 900 feet. The Peerless 
is reported to have four strings 
running and six rigs up. This 
company has three wells drilling 
and three rigs building. The 
Imperial and the Thirty-three Oil 
companies are not doing anything. 
When they ceased operations last 
spring they left several rigs stand- 
ing. Ncs 21 and 22 reported as 
"rigs" have been drilled for a long 
time. The Herald reports Southern 
Pacific as dulling Nos. 36 and 37 
and 38, 39, 40 and 41 as rigs. The 
fact is wells Nos. 36, 37, 38, 39 
and 40 have been drilled some 
time and are pumping. No. 4* is 
drilling and rig for 42 is building. 
The S. P. expects to drill 32 more 
wells. 

The Apollo is drilling one well 
and has two rigs up. The Alma 
reported to be drilling two wells 
has not been drilling for some time. 
The Nob Hill is getting ready to 
drill. The Wolverine is not drill- 
ing. The Petroleum Development 
reported to have 7 and 8 drilling. 
No. 7 was finished, No 8 was 
drilling in sand and No. 9 was rig; 
will start drilling in a few days. 
The Eclipse instead of drilling sus 
pended operations months ago and 
the material was sold. Del Rey< 
No. 5 was finished several weeks 
ago. Panorama was abandoned 
long since and Manager Dukeman 
has been selling off the outfit for a 
month past. The Junction Oil 



PACIFIC Oil. RHPORTER. 



up and will begin drilling 
week. 

much for the Hera, 
pott. We don't know how many 
more of the statements in the 
report of Kern River are untrue. 
The fact is that instead of there 
being 81 drilling « 

nded. there are n. t more 
than 40. If other fields are as 

ctlyor incorrectly .. 
this one, what is the real value of 
the Herald's That is a 

problem in proportion lor • 
idle oil men to s< 

It is reported here to-day that 
the Standard Oil company has 
bought the Monte Cristo or is 
about to do so. It will not be 
surprising if the rumor turns out 
to be true. That is the Standard's 
policj — not to prospect, but buy 
the best producing properties at 
reasonable figures. There is no 
doubt that the Standard regards 
this one of the best fields in the 
country to-day — all its movements 
tend to this conclusion, and in clue 
season it may be expected that it 
will buy up some of the largest 
and best properties in the field, if 
it can do so, and it usually can. 

To Regulate Prices. 

Another scheme to handle and 
control the production of the Kern 
River field has been launched, 
says the Echo. The details have 
not yet been perfected, but the 
plan will be made public shortly 
and the contract for signatures 
will probably be ready for distribu- 
tion by the first of next week. 
Unlike the Associated Oil company 
which asks for a transfer of all the 
holdings to this single corporation 
the new enterprise will seek to 
control the production of the field. 
The several companies will con- 
tinue as the owners of their hold- 
ings, but the product will be pooled 
and the profits divided in propor- 
tion to the sales made. 



German Steamers. 

The Hamburg-American Steam- 
ship company has just had two of 
its steamers fitted for the use of 
liquid fuel. One of these has- 
lately arrived at her home port 
from Suez, where she has had the 
apparatus fitted. It is remarkable 
that in most British steamers fitted 
for liquid fuel the oil is sprayed 
on the fire by steam; in these two 
Germari steamers it is sprayed 
simply by the pressure under 
which the oil is forced to the 
burners. 

A Big Record. 

In spite of lack of cars Kern 
county last month shipped out 
2,364 oil tank cars, and would have 
shipped out 500 more if the cars 
could have been obtained. 

"But how," they asked, after it 
was all over, "did you manage to 
lose your money so quickly? " 

"Well, you see, 1 thought the 
market was bearish and so I sold 
it short." 

"Ah! And the price went up." 

" No, the price was all right, 
but the house went up." 



'>« OIL. 

\vm Cct M> Raw 

M.-ncrinl from Kern County. 
All interesting : the 

appearance of a formidable new 
r in the local gas field, in 
the recently incorporated Cali- 
forn ctric company, 

is the fact that the new company 
will manufacture its gas from the 
mineral oil which is found in the 
Kern River district. It seems that 
ducting the enterprise 
;.itciits for certain pro- 
- by which the crude oil. so 
plentiful in this state, may be con- 
verted into illuminating gas of a 
high grade at a comparatively low 
cost of production, enabling them 
as Vice President de Sabla said a 
lew days ago, to furnish gas to 
the consumer at 75 cents a thou- 
sand cubic feet and do well. As 
previously announced, one of the 
great plants of the new company 
will be situated in San Francisco, 
but the other will be at Bakers 
field, right ic the heart of the oil 
district, from which place the 
product will be carried by pipe 
line to San Francisco and inter- 
mediate points. 

The Chronicle says: The en- 
trance upon the local field of the 
new competitor is regarded with 
anything but composure by the 
already established companies, 
who are themselves already in 
competition. While in those dis- 
tricts where the mains of the com- 
peting companies do not come in 
conflict the price of gas is now 
$1.25 and over per thousand cubic 
feet, in other districts, particularly 
down town, where the mains are 
in proximity, the price is 75 cents 
and even 50 cents per thousand. 
The entrance into the competition 
of the new company, supplying 
gas at a uniform rate of 75 cents, 
will, it is inferred, create a read- 
justment of prices involving such 
conseqences that an ultimate ab- 
sorption of most if not all of the 
present companies may be looked 
for. 

Joseph B. Crockett, president of 
the San Francisco Gas company, 
was reluctant yesterday to ex- 
press any opinion as to the effect 
upon his company of the inroads 
of the new California Gas and 
Electric company. 

'" I have known for some time," 
said he, " of what was going on in 
this direction, and the news did 
not come as a surprise. The new 
company is entirely independent 
of us. As to the effect of its sell 
ing gas at 75 cents per thousand 
cubic feet, I will say that we are 
already selling it at 50 cents down 
town and at 75 cents in other 
places. That speaks for itself. I 
do not think that J. Edward Ad- 
dicks is at the back of the new 
company. I do not know this 
positively. That is only my 
personal opinion. Regarding 
competition, the gas companies 
here are already in competition, 
and the new developments merely 
amount to the introduction of a 
new competitor in the field." 



Oil In Antelope Valley. 

B. P. Carter has been buying 
and locating large tracts of land 
in Aatelo| 

county, near Lancaster. In re- 
to this the Antelope Valley 

About two years ago the United 
1 geological survej . 
sent to California, it was said at 
the time, to ascertain whether 
there really was oil 111 California, 
or whether it was some more of 
her boasting of valuable resources, 
perhaps only fancied. 

"Anyway, their map marked 
this locality as oil lands, and thus 
was their report made. Mr. Carter 
accidentally coming info posses- 
sion of the map, concluded he 
would test the geological survey, 
lie brought an expert here (.but 
he didn't introduce him to any of 
us) and asked the expert, who is 
supposed to solve all hidden 
mysteries, to locate oil, if there 
were any. He located oil in ex- 
actly the same territory covered 
by the United States geological 
surveys. Artesian water was 
analyzed and found to contain gas 
in large proportions. Everything 
that could be done to solve the 
problem has been done, and the 
utmost faith in splendid oil ter- 
ritory is held. 

"Mr. Carter has shown his faith 
in the outcome by covering nearly 
50,000 acres of land. He has al- 
ready spent $30,000 in purchases, 
and this is but the beginning of 
the expense. Mr. Carter is using 
his own money, and no one else's, 
in the scheme, and he, as well as 
most others who have investigated 
the matter, are confident that at 
no distant day flowing oil wells 
will be as plentiful as water. 

"Events of still greater interest 
will be given to you later on, and 
Antelope valley may yet become 
renowned- in song and story." 

Oil in Court House. 

Last week Tuesday the new 25- 
horse power boiler was heated up 
at the Bakersfield courthouse for 
the first time with oil. At the 
November meeting of the Board of 
Supervisors it was decided that 
the county buildings should be 
warmed by oil as fuel and accord- 
ingly the contract for installing 
the plant was awarded to the Cali- 
fornia Drill and Iron Works. The 
boiler and oil tanks have since 
that time been placed at the rear 
of the courthouse and last week 
the pipes were warmed up with 
very satisfactory results. 

That Philadelphia man who was 
fined $25 for holding a girl's hand 
may be able to draw some consola- 
tion from the reflection that it 
might have cost him more to have 
held some poker hands that we 
have seen — Atlanta Journal. 



"I see your friend, E. Z. Marque, 
that went out west to invest in a 
mine is back." 

' So I heard. Say, but he's a 
lucky dog." 

Why, he didn't buy the mine, ' 

" I know it. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

indorsed By the California Petroleum 
Miners' Association' 



W B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 
Office and Editorial Rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



Telephone, Bush, 176 
TERMS 

One Year $250 

Six Months * 50 

Three Months 1 00 

Single Copies 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 



Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Re 
porter, 318 Pine stieet, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32*. 33. Comrounicatior'smust be accompanied by 
writer's name ana address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 



Entered in the Postofi^ce at San Francisco, Cal 
as second-class matter. 



FRIDAY, DEChMBER 13. 1901 

The nature of conditions in Cali- 
fornia resembles 
Conditions in those of Ohio, 
California much more than 

of Texas. Cali- 
fornia is through with its " boom " 
and is settling down to good work. 
As its production increases, so does 
its market, and the result is a 
price that is constantly growing 
firmer and steadier — which makes 
this field, too, appeal more to the 
conservative investor than to the 
speculator who desires to become 
rich or poor in a day, with about 
even chances for either result. 



Now that the ■ railroad commis- 
isoners have 



Railroads 
Getting Even 



determined to 
lower the rates 
charged by the 
railroads for transpoitaUon of oil 
the railroads in their turn are 
"getting even" on the oil indus- 
try by refusing to furnish tank 
cars, and are thus injuring those 
who depend upon oil for fuel, as 
those concerns which cannot ob- 
tain oil are obliged to shut down 
waiting a fresh supply of fuel. 

An instance of this was seen 
last week when owing to a short- 
age of oil cars on the narrow 
gauge railway sufficient crude oil 
could not be furnished to keep 
the sugar mill at Santa Maria sup- 
plied with fuel. The mill had to 
shut down for several days and it 
is feared much damage may result 
to beets from decay, about seven 
days' run of beets being on hand. 

The sugar mill at Santa Maria 
is operated by one of the wealth- 
iest concerns in the state, but it, 
like the Union Iron Works, had 
to yield to the caprice of the rail- 
road magnates who are doing all 
they can to injure the oil indus- 
try. 

The letter from Hon. Frank 
H. Short, published in another 
column, is especially interesting 
in this connection. 



According to a contributor of the 
Londo n Petro- 
Tempering leum Review, drill 
Drill Points points can be tem- 
pered and ren- 
dered very hard by the use of the 
following composition: Six ounces 
carbonate of ammonia, six ounces 
nitrate of potash, four ounces soap 
and fifteen gallons of soft water. 
These ingredients should be 
thoroughly mixed by agitation. 
The tool points, while still red hot, 
must be submerged in the liquid 
only so far as the tempering is 
wanted, and supported in this 
position until cooled and hardened 
sufficientty. Ihe inventor of the 
composition is Mr. Joseph F. 
Pfleger, who makes public his 
formula without attempting to 
patent it. 



THE STANDARD GOT THERE. 



The Monte Cristo Turns Over All 
Its Contracts to the Standard. 

The Monte Cristo is perhaps the 
largest oil producer <n the Kern 
field. It has now twenty produc- 
ing wells averaging 100 barrels 
each, at a low estimate. It has 
nearly 160 acres of rich oil land. 
It has made the largest and per- 
haps the best contracts made in 
the State, such as for supplying 
the Market Street Railway, and 
the Union Iron Woks with fuel 
oil. It has other large contracts. 

It has been unable to supply the 
oil it contracted to supply on ac- 
count of the inability or unwilling- 
ness of the railroad companies to 
supply sufficient tank cars. As a 
consequence the biggest con 
sumers of oil in the State were 
obliged to return to the use of coal. 

A few days ago the Monte 
Cristo turned over all its contracts 
to the Standard Oil Company, 
which has all the tank cars it 
ueeds, and will have its pipe line 
completed to the bay by July. 

In round numbers the Monte 
Cristo has agreed to supply the 
Standard with something like 
4,100,000 barrels of oil within the 
next five years. 

If this does not knock the "com- 
bine" on the head, what will? 

As soon as the deal was effected 
the oil tanks of the Union Iron 
Works were filled full by the 
Standard Oil Company. The same 
with those of the Market Street 
Railway Company. 

Other oil companies who are 
unable to supply oil as they con- 
tracted to are also negotiating 
with the Standard. 



THE STANDARD ROCK. 



A Company Which Now Has a 
Very Bright Future. 

As there are so many people, 
especially in the east, constantly 
inquiring about the standing and 
holdings of the Standard Rock Oil 
Company and frequently go to the 
wrong source, an absolute true 
and correct statement is made in 
this issue. Some people have 



written to Col. Crane, President of 
the unofficial Pacific Coast Petro- 
leum Miners' Association, and the 
Standard Rock Oil Co. has repeat- 
edly refused to give any informa- 
tion to Col. Crane or any one like 
him. There is only one official 
association in the State of Cali- 
fornia, and that is the "California 
Petroleum Miners' Association," to 
whom we refer with respect, and 
who can be trusted to give out un- 
biased and reliable information as 
well as the Pacific Oii, Reporter, 
which paper stands ever ready to 
assist the investing public and pre- 
vent the unwary and uninformed 
from falling into the hands of the 
unscrupulous and fakers of the oil 
business. A company which can 
refer to such references publicly 
is perfectly safe and trustworthy 
and that the Standard Rock Oil 
Co., can do. This company owns 
160 acres of oil land in Napa 
county adjoining the Calistoga 
Oil Development Company's well; 
also owns 80 acres within two 
miles of the famous Home Oil 
Company's 1,000 barrel well and 
many others in Coalinga District, 
Fresno county. 

The Standard Rock Oil has 
leased 52 acres of absolutely 
proven lands in McKittrick which 
land is entirely surrounded by 
good producers and within three 
quarters of a mile of the Southern 
Pacific Railroad station. 

The Standard Rock has leased 
recently 6,000 acres of veiy rich 
asphaltum lands from the City 
Street Improvement company for 
seventeen years and eight months 
on a royalty of 65 cents per ton ot 
crude and $1.15 per ton of refined 
asphaltum, which latter is retailed 
at from $19 to £25 per ton and 
actually costs the company de- 
livered in San Francisco $10.75 
per ton. 

A lease on these 6,000 acres is 
considered better than the owner- 
ship, as the lands are appraised at 
$500,000, and the interest on this 
large sum can now be applied as 
dividends to stockholders, out of 
sales from the asphaltum. 

The Standard Rock could not 
very well own these lands con- 
sidering that the whole capital- 
ization of this company is only 
$300,000, and much less could the 
company sell their shares at 50 
cents as common sense must indi- 
cate. 

Without belittling other oil com- 
panies it can be said there is not a 
company in the state which has 
such a bright future in store as 
the Standard Rock, and some day 
when this stock will be quoted at 
$10 per share people will say: 
"Well, well, I could have bought it 
at one time at 50 cents." This is 
not speculation, but a giltedged 
investment. 



Has it Ever Occurred to You 

That the average investor in oil 
stocks does not use his best judg- 
ment in buying? Why should he 
not look carefully into the com- 
pany's propositions? Why not 



find out the integrity and business 
competency of the officers? Why 
not verify the company's state- 
ments about their oil location, 
their progress, whether the com- 
pany's location is on proven land 
or near producing wells, and if the 
production is a paying one? 

Why should not the investor 
know if the by-laws are fair and 
equitable? Why should not the 
investor know whether the char- 
ter is safe and sound, whether it 
has complied with the law re- 
quirements? There may be no 
limit to the corporate debt. You 
may be burglarized out of your in- 
vestment by assessments. 

Has it ever occurred to you to 
at,k if the company has any 
money in bank for development; 
if they pay exorbitant salaries to 
officers; if they have extravagant 
office expenses; or do you know 
anything about the personel of 
the directors who are to spend 
your cash? Should you not in- 
vestigate as carefully in oil shares 
as you would in buying a house? 
There are big profits in oil in- 
vestments providing you use your 
brains. Has it ever occurred to 
you that you should not take all 
the chances in the investment? 
Would it not be a good thing to 
have your cash guaranteed to you 
if any misfortune befell the com- 
pany? 

Would it not be a good thing to 
invest in a company with assets 
strong enough, with prospects 
sure enough, to put up a good and 
sufficient bond that your money 
will be carefully and conserva- 
tively spent for development pur- 
poses? 

Did it ever occur to you that it 
would be a very good thing before 
you turn over your hard-earned 
cash to strangers, to investigate 
the merits of their proposition? 

Has it ever occurred to you that 
it would be a good thing to in- 
quire carefully into the personel 
of a company, their progress since 
incorporation, their promises and 
their prospects? 

A company should give proof of 
the integrity of the management, 
copies of their by-laws, blank 
forms of application, bonds, guar- 
antees, stock certificates, bank 
references, stockholder's testi- 
mony, and prove to you before 
you invest a dollar that they have 
made fine progress, have a first- 
class management and reputable 
business standing, a fine banking 
record, and that competent credit 
examiners and the very shrewd- 
est investors say that its propo- 
sitions to investors for its stock 
are conservative, safe and sure. 

Finally. Has it ever occurred 
to you that you can get these 
proofs, these forms and blanks, 
these facts, this testimony, by 
writing to one of the most suc- 
cessful oil companies in California; 
the Paxton Gold Bond Oil com- 
pany, Room 7, First Floor, Mills 
building, San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



A NEW OIL DISTRICT. 



("Continued from page 3.) 
Kansas City. President J. Henry 
Tschudy is a prominent lumber 
merchant. Messrs. Sooy and 
Dodge are respectively president, 
and vice-president and treasurer 
of the Kansas City Hay l'ress 



He has made a careful study of 
the oil possibi. 

County, and particular^ of that 
portion where the land of the 
San Mateo County Oil Company 
ated. Mr. O'Hrien and Mr 
Davis both deserve much credit 
for the formation of the company 
and for the energetic manner in 




Company. Mr. Meservey, treas- 
urer of the company and Mr. A. F. 
Pierce, a large stockholder, are 
prominent attorneys. 

Mr. Henry H. Davis is a promi- 
nent attorney of San Francisco. 
Mr. O'Brien was for eighteen 
years a resident of Kansas City, 
where he is favorably known. 



which the plans of the incorpora- 
tors have been carried out. Mr. 
Tschudy recently made a personal 
inspection of the company's lands 
in San Mateo County and he is 
now prepared to furnish any in- 
formation relative thereto that 
may be desired. 

The capital stock of the San 



Mateo Count;. 

$1,000,000, divided into 1,000,000 
tsof the par value of $ 1 each. 
'.his capital 9 
shares ha placed in the 

.iry to be used for develop- 
ment purposes and for the 
I iiU'tJt of all ol th« Mers 

The company is practically n> 

ration, nearly all the monc\ 
having been furnished by the 
present Directi 

Subscriptions for stock may be 
sent by mail, either by check, 
money order or registered letter, 
express to San Mateo County 
oil Company, A r. Morse, vice- 
secretary, 31 6 American Hank 
Building. Kansas City, Mo. or to 
the San Mateo County Oil Com- 
pany, Chas. P. O'Hrien, Secretary, 
7 Mills building, Ground Floor, 
San Francisco, Cat. 

The news has just been received 
that a ten-barrel well was struck 
last week by Frick & Parker, at a 
depth of 500 feet. The well is 
located in the belt on which the 
well of the San Mateo County Oil 
Company's well is located. The oil 
is worth $1.40 a barrel. The oil 
will ignite if a lighted match is 
held six inches away. 

The prospects of the San Mateo 
company are undoubtedly very 
bright. The oil indications are 
very favorable. The problem of 
transportation is already solved. 
Wood and water are abundant. 



The men at the head of the enter- 
are influential and respected 
iltal is abund- 
ant, and those iu charge of prac- 
development work under- 
stand their 

The pr. ultimate suc- 

.ue certainly flattering. 



Still Booming. 

cm reports show that the 
sti ck of the Yankee Girl company 
is meeting with excellent favor. 

M>n l'o 1 it. 

The company has two good pro- 
ducing wells at Los Angeles, will 
be drilling on its own land 
in the heart of the Kern River 
district, has as good land as can 
be found in Sunset district, and 
owns over 300 acres of oil land in 
San Benito county. 

The management understands 
the 1 il business from a to z, and 
has bought all the land with its 
own money, owns its own rigs, 
and knows how to drill a well 
with the best of them. 

No wonder the stock is selling 
well. It ought to. 



Another Refinery. 

Dan O'Donnell, a former Penn- 
sylvanian, one who promoted and 
sold a short time ago the Paris Oil 
company, one of the best prop- 
erties in the Western Extension, 
has a company organized for a 
new refiuery in Los Angeles. 
Capacity of 300 barrels or more a 
day. The land has been pur- 
chased. Of late Mr. O'Donnell 
has been buying and drilling 
deeper oil wells in eastern end of 
Los Angeles field. 




mm 

SAN MATEO CO.,CAL 



8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



RUSSIA THREATENS. 



Opening o» a Pipe Line Threat- 
ens Our Oil Trade. 

There promises to be some re- 
adjustment in the markets of the 
world for the sale of American pe- 
troleum. The principal sources 
of supply for the world's petroleum 
market are the United States and 
Russia, and there will not prob- 
ably be any change in that respect 
in the very near future, as the 
other producing countries do not 
produce enough for their own 
needs. The work of laying pipes 
from the petroleum district of 
Baku to the port of Batoum prom- 
ises, however, to bring about a 
contest for supremacy in certain 
of the foreign markets. This is 
clearly indicated in an article that 
appeared in the Frankfurter Zei- 
tung.and that was brought under 
the notice of the state department 
at Washington by Vice-Consul 
General Murphy, who forwarded 
a translation from Frankfurt The 
following is an excerpt from it: 

"In the year 1900 Russia sup- 
plied 35 per cent of all the petro- 
leum offered for sale in the mar- 
kets of the world— namely, 73,- 
000,000 poods (365,000,000 gallons) 
out of a total of 207,000,000 poods 
(1,035,000,000 gallons). In 1900 
Russia produced 672,000,000 poods 
(3,360,000,000 gallons) of naph- 
tha, while, the production of the 
United States was only 42 1,000,000 
poods (2,105,000,000 gallons). The 
weak participation of Russia in 
supplying the world's markets was 
due to the fact that Russian freight 
rates to the seaport are too high 
and the means of transportation 
are insufficient. 

"The reason usually given in 
Russia — namely, that the pro- 
ducers, for business reasons, giye 
more attention to the manufacture 
of naphtha products than to the 
refining of oil — is correct only be- 
cause of the obstacles to transpor- 
tation just mentioned. The trans- 
portation of Russian petroleum is 
now effected by means of the 
Baku-Batoum railway and the rail- 
way from Petrovsk (on the Cas- 
pian sea) to Novorossisk (on the 
Black sea). The latter is of minor 
importance, and carries petroleum 
only when the Baku-Batoum line 
is overburdened with traffic or 
when the prices of petroleum are 
so high that this more expensive 
route can be profitably used." 
The article proceeded to show 



that the Russian government has 
undertaken the completion of the 
pipe-line not merely as a financial 
venture, but for the declared pur- 
pose of helping the Russian petro- 
leum industry to compete in the 
markets of the world, and conse- 
quently will be satisfied with a 
very moderate profit in order to 
accomplish this object. If no 
changes are made in existing 
treaties and in the rates fixed 
thereby it is apparent that the 
Russian product will be able to 
compete with the American pro- 
duct in the world's markets, and 
moreover, Germany (one of the 
largest buyers), by adopting a 
hostile attitude toward American 
petroleum, can still further com- 
plicate the stringent commercial 
situation at present existing. 

While it is true that Baku oil 
has not been able to hold its own 
with the American oil on the score 
of excellence, it can be sold very 
much cheaper. 



SOURCE OF SERIOUS INJURY. 



Assessment Work. 

This month is a month of work 
for the companies who have not 
been doing active work on their 
properties during the past year, 
says the Californian. There are 
but few days remaining during 
which time the assessment work 
on a large amount of property, 
now being held as oil land, located 
last year, will have to be done. 
If this work, to the amount of 
$too, is not done and recorded 
during the present month the 
property will, under the law, be 
open for relocation on January 1. 
There are an unlimited number of 
claims in the local field and a still 
greater number in the other dis- 
tricts of the county, which with- 
out doubt are oil-bearing, and yet 
up to this date not a dollar's worth 
of work has been done thereon. 
Several corporations have, during 
the present week been working 
out their assessment and still oth- 
ers have engaged laborers to make 
required improvements at an early 
date. 

Last year there were but a few 
pieces of mineral land that re- 
verted to the Government on ac- 
count of the work not being done, 
and it is thought that this year's 
list will be still less, as the value 
of the oil locations have been 
clearly demonstrated. 



Attitude of the Railroads a 
Menace to the Oil Industry. 

Hon. Frank H Short has twice 
championed successfully the cause 
of the oil industry in its efforts to 
obtain lower freight rates from the 
railroad companies. He has also 
successfully combated the scrip- 
pers in their atttempts to unlaw- 
fully wrest from the oil men the 
land they were successfully de- 
veloping. Consequently the fol- 
lowing letter is particularly valua- 
ble and interesting: 

Fresno, Cat,., Dec. 9, 1901. 

W. B. Winn, Pacific Oil, Reporter, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

DEAR Sir: — I wish to congratulate you 
upon the valuable work being done by 
the Oil Reporter I have had occasion 
to make mj'self somewhat familiar with 
the oil business and the surrouudir g con- 
ditions in the state and I think you are 
publishing a very valuable and intelli- 
gent as well as independent journal 
which is destined to do the oil business 
a great deal ot good, and of course by so 
doing will benefit itself and its pub- 
lishers. It is not to be denied that the 
present conditions from many points of 
view are very unfavorable. There is no 
other one thing that would so benefit 
the oil industry at present as co-opera- 
tion on the part of transportation com- 
panies. If they would, as they ob- 
viously could do, provide sufficient 
facilities for transportation so that both 
the purchaser and consumer could rely 
upon prompt delivery of cil when needed, 
the oil situation would be vastly im- 
proved. The rates recently established 
are ample remuneration to the railroad 
companies, and at the same time are 
reasonably fair to the producer and con- 
sumer, and it is a source of serious in- 
jury, not only to the producers and con- 
sumers but, I believe, to the transporta- 
tion companies themselves, that they are 
not only threatening not to obey the 
orders regulating rates, but are exhibit- 
ing an amount of negligence in produc- 
ing transportation and cars that it is 
getting to indicate willful neglect, 

I sincerely trust that wiser counsel will 
prevail and the business be conducted 
in a manner to bring profit to all parties 
in interest and not litigation, hard feel- 
ings and mutual loss. 

Wishing you the best of success, I 
remain, Very truly yours, 

Frank H. Short. 



Los Angeles Stocks. 

Business was lively on the floor 
of the Los Angeles Stock Ex- 
change during a portion of last 
week and some of the stocks 
fluctuated in good old fashioned 
style as they did a year ago. 

Westlake was one of the first to 
respond to active buying orders 
and quickly advanced from s% to 



8 cents. On the following day it 
dropped back as low as 6yi cents, 
advancing later to 7% cents which 
was the final quotation on this 
security at the close of business 
last Saturday. Reed Crude also 
went up on buying orders. Open- 
ing early in the week at 33 y 2 some 
thousands shares were knocked 
down at this figure until a con- 
tinued demand forced it up to 35 
cents from which it fell back a 
half a point at the close. The in- 
cidental trading on these securities 
goes to show how readily any 
stock will respond to a buying 
movement. There are many of 
the better class of oil and . mining 
stocks that would advance ma- 
terially in price were an offer 
made to buy in any amount of 
them. At the same lime it must 
be confessed that anything like an 
active selling market would also 
result in sending the price of any 
one stock down several points. 

Mining stocks have been more 
in demand than ever, notably 
Butte Lode, Bisbee West Copper 
and Verde King. The latter has 
advanced a number of points with- 
in the week just past. 

No changes of importance were 
recorded in bank and miscellaneous 
securities. 



World Ready For Oil. 

Departure of oil tanker "Car- 
dium" loaded with 60,000 barrels 
Beaumont Oil for London is the 
first of a fleet of 35 tank steamers 
for the Old World. The Atlas is 
now in port loading oil for New 
York. A new transportation com- 
pany buys five tank steamers and 
has contracted for four million 
barrels of Beaumont oil a year. 
The company's operating and to 
operate their own tank cars are 
the Guffy Petroleum company, 
Higgins Oil and Fuel company, 
Heywood Oil company and Guar- 
antee Oil and Refining company. 



At Rodeo. 

The National Oil Refining com- 
pany's plant located at Rodeo will 
be in running order by February 
1st, providing no serious delays 
are met with. The Boston com- 
panies of Sunset have a large 
amount . of oil in storage, which 
will be refined at this plant as 
soon as it is completed. 



IT WILL PAY YOU 

to write to P. O. Box 117, Visalia 
Cal,, before you buy OIL STOCK, 
lease or buy OIL LANDS or Oi 
Casing. 



Fishing Tools 



Fishing Tools 



A fall line of fishing tools constantly on hand for rent. Casing speais, casing cutters, swedges, combination slip sockets, slip 
sockets, horn sockets, bull dog sockets, under-reamers, rope spears, rope grab, rope sockets, spuds, boot-jacks, fishing jars, subs, 
spiders or ring and wedge, tool wrenches, tool hooks, jar-knockers, elevators, and anything else pertaining to the oil business. 

Bishop Fishing Tool Company 

91 Fremont Street, San Francisco. 

Branches at McKit}rick and Sunset. 



50c Asphaltum Refinery 50c 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure 

Gilt=Edged Stock 



Inside of tw> months this valuable 

We leased land in McKittrick. half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 51 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, mar famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa Counly. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish 
We have just secured 

6000 ACRES 6000 ACRES 

of laud that produces untold quantities of asphalt 
near Sargvnts Station. 



stiK-k will cost you One Dollar. 

We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
asphalt at ,1 figure which will enable us to pay divi" 
.lends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract carload lots for crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses are erected and foundation for Re- 
fining Works is NOW under construction. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned inside of 90 
days. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $20 per ton 
is better than the Trinidad at $35. 



STANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY 

475-476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONB, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 



AAA*A*<^*A***A'V^lAAA*^»^*AA.^^*vv»**»v^*>v*^*»v'*■^^^^**^Al^**/*^A/^*^^*A^ 



Choice Oil Land for Sale 

We have been authorized to sell three pieces of land in Section 13, Township 29, Range 28, in that portion of the 

Kern River Oil district known as 

SOUTH OF KERN RIVER 

It is all patented land and the title is guaranteed. 

The Chicago Extension is now drilling on the land adjoining, with every prospect of striking oil. 

The Wizard Oil Company is drilling southwest of us. 

The Panorama had 150 feet of oil sand on Section 14, adjoining us, but lost the well. 

The land is only a mile south of Discovery well, where oil was first struck in the Kern River District. 

There is no doubt but that with a proper rig for drilling in the soft formations oil will be struck here at about 1500 feet. 

We will sell this land in a body, or will split it up into three pieces. 

We are able to offer it for a short time only at 

$60 PER ACRE 

This is over 50 per cent lower than any land is offered in this portion of the district. 



EASY TERMS 



EASY TERMS 



For maps and further information apply to 

THE PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



THE PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments In Oil In Various Parts 
of the State. 



COLUSA. 

The Williams well is being cased to 
shut off the salt water, which was en- 
countered at 500 feet. 

Not a word has come down from the 
derrick of the Chehalis company, and 
the stockholders and the public will 
have to be contented with the thought 
that ",'No news is good news." 

A single tour is now being worked on 
the Smith & Gorrill well on Sand Creek. 
Mr. Gorrill spends most of his time at 
the scene of operations and by his ac- 
tions shows he has faith in the district. 

CONTRA COSTA. 

The American Oil and Refinery com- 
pany on the Minor ranch are still peg- 
ging away. It is said they will have to 
pull their casing. 

The National Paraffine company have 
been delayed waiting for an under- 
reamer. The well is down 1250 feet with 
the best indications in the way of gas 
and oil seepages for a big body of oil 
underneath. 

The Berkeley Crude Oil company 
drilling two miles west of Lafayette, on 
Tuesday had reached a depth of 1150 
feet, the last 500 feet being in sandstone 
requiring no casing. This company has 
drilled twelve weeks, single tour, with a 
Star rig, and have averaged 16 feet a day, 
some days making over 30 feet. There 
is plenty of gas and some oil. 

The Golden West Oil company, which 
is working on the property of the Grand 
Pacific Oil company, has pulled its <)% 
inch casing, and will under-ream so as to 
go down with the uji casing. The well 
is straight, and the directors of the com- 
pany are confident that with the new 
machinery, handled by competent men, 
they will soon reach the oil strata. 

HDMBOLDT. 
The well which the Hoagland people 
have been sinking on the Etter place in 
Upper Mattole is to be abandoned. Their 
casing got stuck and they could go no 
further. They are now engaged pulling 
up the casing. This will be completed 
in a few days, and then the work here 
will be over for the winter. Although a 
large amount of money has been spent 
on this well, seemingly to little purpose, 
another well will probably be sunk in 
the spring but whether on the present 
site or on the Hindley property is not 
known, 

KERN. 

Hawkeye State No. 2 has been per- 
forated. 

Black Jack has only one string of tools 
working. ' 

Mascot No. 2, in Midway, is good for 
fifty barrels. 

Indiana is starting another well on its 
property in Kern River. 

The Stevens well, on section 19, is now 
pumping a large amount of oil. 

Junction No. 5 lias been rigged up. 
The company expects to begin spud- 
ing in very soon. 

Perseus No. 3 is now down 900 feet. 
The company expects to complete the 
hole the first of next week. 

The Lucky Boy is preparing to re- 
sume work on its well on 31, 32-24. Work 
will be in progress again next week. 

The Pacific Tank company is putting 



up a 2000 barrel water tank on the 
Chanslor and Canfield property in Mid- 
way. 

The Banner, section 19, 28-28, will re- 
sume work on one of the holes begun 
several months ago during the next few 
days. 

The Hart Crude on section 36, 28-27 
has perforated its well No. 2 and as a 
result is securing a much greater pro- 
duction. 

The work of drilling the Mecca well 
on section 19 is progressing favorably. 
The drill is rapidly working its way 
downward. 

The York syndicate's well on section 
8, 29-28, is said to be as promising a hole 
as has ever been drilled in the southern 
part o( the district. 

The Sunset O. K. on 26, 12-24 has 
suspended operations for the present, 
but later on will probably resume drill- 
ing at the old camp. 

The deed of the Star company, con- 
veying the northwest quarter of north- 
west quarter of section II, 29-28, to the 
Spring Oil has been recorded. 

The O. K., a company operating in 
northern Sunset, will dispose of its per- 
sonal effects and for the present will 
abandon operations. The company will 
retain its lease. 

The American Girl well, on section 7, 
11-23, has reached a depth of 950 feet 
and has touched the second oil sand. 
Work is now suspended pending the 
arrival of tools and casing. 

Kern Crown, operating on section 23, 
32-23, has struck, a flow of oil which is 
said to surpass anything heretof Jre en- 
countered in the neighborhood. The 
sand was found near the 1000 foot level. 

So far as development work is con- 
cerned the McKittrick district is quiet. 
Very few rigs are in operation, but the 
shipments of oil are averaging up with 
the record made during the past few 
months. 

The Union is prosecuting its work on 
section 8, 29-28, of preparing the ground 
for its refinery with all possible haste. 
The company is now grading for the 
plant, is building its loading racks on the 
railroad spur, which is being laid to its 
property, and is planning to erect several 
buildings to be used as bunk houses and 
offices. 

The San Joaquin Oil and Development 
Company will add fifty more tank cars 
to its rolling stock. The company now 
has an equipment of fifty cars but that 
is not sufficient to handle the product 
from their score of wells so the number 
will be increased to one hundred Re- 
ports announce the first of the cars will 
arrive here in about six weeks. 

The Areola Extension's well in Sun- 
set is flowing a stream similar to that of 
of the old Areola which attracted atten- 
tion for months after its completion. 
The Cahfornian says that the ravines 
near the extension well are serving as 
receptacles for the oil. The company is 
now anxiously awaiting the completion 
of the Sunset railroad and the announce- 
ment that work on the Sunset pipe line, 
which is now in prospect, has begun. 

Tremont No. 2, on section 2, 11-24, 
has recently been completed with five 
and five-eighths casing and is now 
awaiting the perforator. The oil is flow- 



ing from between the casing. It bids 
fair of being the leading well of the dis- 
trict. No. 1 is also about completed. 
Roy L. Haber, the driller of the well, 
has had good success with his work. 
The nine and five-eighths casing in this 
well was lowered into the sand without 
the aid of drive clamps. The method of 
this company is to shovel no sand and 
settlings. The oil is allowed to run down 
the ravines. After it stands for a few 
days it is then pumped into the 20,000 
barrel reservoir free of sand and wa'er. 

The pioneer correspondent of the Los 
Angeles Herald has the following to say 
of a new spectacular producer in north- 
ern Sunset: California Fortune No. 2 
had a blowout this week that rivaled in 
spectacular features the performance of 
the Queen, which is situated at the 
southern end of the field. Sand was 
encountered in the Fortune No. 2 dur- 
ing the spring, and although the show- 
ing then made was excellent, it was de- 
cided, upon the resumption of the work 
at the end of the summer, to drill deeper 
into the sand, making the well 650 feet 
deep. During the progress of the drill- 
ing the oil has flowed over the casing 
and down the canyon, the bed of which 
serves as a road to the property, and so 
great has been the amount of oil that 
the road was rendered impassable, until 
the oil was burnt off. A few days ago a 
rumbling was heard in the well and 
after a few moments the oil shot up in a 
column that extended high above the 
derrick, and continued to spout for 
about ten minutes, after which it sub- 
sided and the oil again began to rise 
quietly to the top of the casing. This 
company has a number of large 
earthen reservoirs full of oil, much of 
which has come from No. 1, the well 
which has flowed more consistently and 
steadily than probably any other well in 
the district. No. 3 is situated about 275 
feet from No. 2 and its location seems 
to justify Superintendent Atkins' pre- 
diction that this well will prove as good 



as its neighbors. Arrangements are 
practically completed for rig No. 4. 

SANTA BARBARA. 

The Clampit company, on the Hartnell 
rancho, is reported to have struck oil at 
about 100 feet but the rumor has not 
yet been confirmed. 

The Graciosa company, on the Harris 
rancho, has its casing closed and the 
correspondent of the Santa Barbara News 
thinks thatit will be impossible to pull it. 

The Western Union company's No. 1 
well, which commenced flowing a few 
days ago, is still capped. No. 4 struck 
oil at 1 100 feet, and a rig for a fifth well 
is about to go up. 

The Prima Vera company, operating 
in the Underhill rancho, is pulling the 
casing from the abandoned well, and No. 
2 is to be begun at a point at a distance 
of about 500 feet from the abandoned 
hole. 

The Western Union Oil company is 
making such a headway in the develop- 
ment of its wells that Blake station gives 
evidence of becoming an important 
county point. A depot is to be erected, 
and the telegraph and express service 
will be of immense aid to the immediate 
territory. 

SANTA CLARA. 

Work was stopped in the Averta well 
on the eastside of Sargents Station owing 
to the loss of a spear. Tools are expected 
in a few days, when boring will be re- 
sumed with a six-inch drill. 

Owing to the snapping of the drill 
work has been suspended for a few days 
in the Gilroy Oil company's well. One 
drill is now in a gray sand formation and 
the indications are favorable for a strike 
at a depth of 1000 feet. 

Drilling will be resumed this week in 
the well of the Pajaro company at Sar- 
gents, operations having been suspended 
pending the arrival of a six-inch casing 
The hole is now at a depth of 900 feet 



KERR'S REPORTS 

(Inc.) 

MONTHLY OIL INVESTMENT 

TABLES 

Give prices, capitalization, assets, character ot 
charter, integrity of management and methods, 
well progress, production and location of oil 
corporations, etc.; official maps. 

We have oil field investigators, ab= 
stract searchers and credit examin- 
ers, the only systematized oil ratiDg agency in 
the world. Authentic Special Reports on 
any oil company, $2.00 upward. 

We have a list of 3000 oil companies; 500 
fraudulent; Soo honest but hopelessly involved 
or incompetent. Do you own stock in 
any of them? 

Subscribe for KERR'S REPORTS 

MONTHLY and keep posted . . . 

One Dollar per year 

Address KERR'S REPORTS, Mills Building, 

San Francisco, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



and a flow of oil is confidently expected 
within the next joo feet. 

was struck in the Moody gulch 
above Los Catos several years ago, but 
the property has never paid. This is 
the first indication that the faith in the 
Santa Clara valley possessing oil de- 
posits is well founded. 

Good progress is reported by the Los 
Gatos Oil company. The well is located 
about a half mile s nit h of the Bear Creek 
summit scboolhouse, on the Boulder 
road. They are now down about three 
hundred feet with a sixtccn-inrb hole. 
They have found considerable natural 
gas and some oil, with flattering r 
tions in ; I he company is 

equipped »nli standard machinery, 
using tbe heaviest grade of tools and 
working two shifts of men. 
A dispatch from San Jose stalls that- 
Tbe first real strike of oil in 
mercial quantities in Santa Clara county 
was made late last Saturday afternxm on 
what is known as the "Old Main" ranch, 
seven mi.es from this city on the Sun 
Jose and Los Gatos ron I. The boiing 
operations on this property began on 
November 1st, under the direction of 
the Orchard Oil company, of which G. 
L. Blair of Oakland is president. Most 
of the stock is held in San Jose. The 
strike was made at the depth of 800 feet 
in the third oil stratum. Water was 
used to hold the oil down and boring 
contiuued. When this stratum is pene- 
trated the pumping of oil will commence. 
Superintendent T. A. Piper gives it as 
his opinion that from 400 to 500 barrels 
a day can be taken out, judging from 
present pressure, while it is quite pro- 
bable that greater deposits will be 
opened before this stratum is pene- 
trated. The oil is ou an asphaltum base 
resembling that of the Kern district. 
Analysis shows it to contain a high per 
cent of illuminating and lubricating 
properties. Two more wells will be 
sunk as soon as machinery can be in- 
stalled. Tbe company has a twenty- 
year lease on 800 acres of land. 

SAN BENITO. 

From Panoche comes the news that 
the Ashurst Oil company is running day 
and night shifts; the World company is 
down 1000 feet, with good indications. 
The Calistoga company has passed the 
1500 fojt mark, and the drill is now 
working in oil sand. 

The San Benito Crude Oil company 
has finished one derrick at Emmet, two 
more are being built near Erie, and when 
these are finished two more will be built. 

The Silver Creek Land and Develop- 
ment company, in the Vallecitos, will 
soon commence the development of their 
lands for oil in that district. This com- 
pany recently leased two tracts of land 
and the work of developing the same in 
the very near future will commence. 

The Twin Cities Oil company has pur 
chased from T. N. Williams a tract of 
land in section 5, Tp. 17 S., R. 12 E., in 
the Vallecitos. The directors and stock- 
holders of the company are Nevada City 
capitalists and sufficient money has al- 
ready been subscribed to thoroughly 
develop the land. A rig will soon be in 
place and active operations commenced. 

New oil companies are being organ- 
ized to develop the Vallecitos district. 
J. H. Martin, George Berg, C. Freden- 
berg, D. H. Peck, G. H. Bradfield, Wm. 
Palmtag and C. V. Gorniley are direc- 
tors of a company to operate in the 
Vallecitos, arrangements are now being 
made to purchase material. 

Chas. E. Ladd, the millionaire banker 
at Portland, Oregon, in addition to the 
well being drilled on the Towle and 
Merrill ranches and the derrick about to 
be built in the O'Hara place, has ordered 
the lumber for two more derricks — one 
o be built on 31, 17-10 and the other one 



10, both near Hernandez valley, 
mention to have seven 
rigs operating in January. 19. . 
Bee. 

LCIS OBISPO. 
An oil drilling outfit has been taken to 
theCholame ranch, on the other side of 
the Coast Range, and the depths will be 
I for oil. K. ]■:. Jack, the San Luis 
Obispo banker, is interested in the n^w 
enter] 11 

SAN JOAQUIN. 

•rding to a statement in the Stock- 
ton Independent the riti/eus of that 
locality are fast getting the oil fever. 
Panda have been rabscribed by ibi 
City folk and all arrangementi have been 

perfected for sinking a test well. If the 
hope* of tba promoters are realized the 

drill will not be long in reaching the 
depths, hot Whether Or not I pay streak 
will he found is a matter that will take I 
some time ii tell. In the meantime 
considerable Stuck in the enterprise is 
heing sold anil the hopes of the investors 
soar high. 

STANISLAUS. 
At the X-Ray oil well near O kdale 
Stanislaus counly, oil was struck last 
Monday and ■>;!< barrels of petroleum 
have been taken out. This is the first 
strike made in this part of the San 
Joaquin Valley. The feasibility of con- 
structing a pipe line to Stockton to con- 
nect with tide water is already being 
considered. Another company is in the 
field and nearly ready to commence 
boring. 

TEHAMA. 

The Corning New Era says: "We were 
reliably informed yesterday afternoon 
that nearly enough money had been 
pledged to the directors of the Corning 
Oil and Gas company by local capital- 
ists to enable them to purchase the re- 
quired new casing, cable etc., and the 
prospects are that work on their well will 
be resumed in a very short time. The 
new casing will be seven and five-eighths 
inches in diameter. When work was 
shut down recently the drill was in oil 
sand, with good indications of soon 
striking a flow. The well is 1996 feet 
deep." 

Producers' Oil Exchange 

The following were the stock sales in 
che Producers' Oil Exchange in the 
lorraal sessions held for the week ending 
Wednesday, December 11: 

BEAR FLAG. 

2200 at 02 44 00 

BURLINGTON. 

1000 at 03 30 00 

CALIFORNIA STANDARD. 

800 at 19 

500 at 20 

CARIBOO. 

5° at 7° 35 00 

EL DORADO. 

50 at 20 10 00 

FOUR OIL. 

200 at 46 92 00 

1500 at 47 705 00 

35° a* 55 • J57 5° 

HOME OIL. 

400 at 3 35 1340 00 

200 at 3 30 660 00 

ioo(B3o) at 3 40 340 00 

HANFORD. 



6ooo(Sao)at 07 
>SOu(iK>u) at oS. 



MONTI- CK1STO. 



too at 

loo at 

100 at 

200 at 

100 at 1 75... 

300 at 

60. at I 80... 



t.-o 00 



It* 5l> 
I60 OO 



152 OO 
100 00 



10 at 93 00. 

i7(S90)at 92 00. 

10 at 92 00. 

14 at 90 00. 

5 at 89 00. 



930 00 

1564 00 

920 00 

1260 00 

445 00 

INDEPENDENCE. 

6000 at 08 480 00 

JUNCTION. 

1500 at 25 375 00 

KERN. 



30 at 5 00 . . . 
loo at 5 i2'/i . 



LION. 



5575 at 07. 



150 00 
512 50 



390 25 



UONARCB OP ARIZONA. 



1000 at 18 

at 17 

■utal 17 

600 at 10 

13 

5o(.-yo)at 12 

")Bt II 

is 

oil CITY PBTROLBOM 

i8oo(S3o)at 20 

2300 at 20 

100 ( Soo)at 20 

1500 at 21 

OCCIDENTAL 



180 00 
935 00 

90 00 
6 50 
6 00 
5 5o 

36 00 



360 00 
460 00 






UNO. 

"I 20 

SAN S 0. & n. 

21000 
SOPBRIOR. 
tooo at 07 70 00 



20uo at 10 

SATOR. 

375 "' 60 jsj 00 

TWI-.M Y 110IIT 

J 50 "t I jo 375 00 

100 at 1 474 nj jo 



OF W. \ A 



500 at 



300 at 
500 at 
lono at 



20 

PITTSBURG. 

10 

11 



12 

PEERLESS. 

50 at 5 00 

PETROLEUM CENTER. 

1300 at 03 

3600 at 04 

100 at 02 



900 at 



REED CRUDE. 
34 



10 


.HI 


315 


OO 


TOO 


Oil 


30 


00 


55 


.1 


120 


00 


-'.SO 


00 


39 


00 


144 


00 


2 


00 


306 


00 



Shares 58,386 Amount (20,354 -5 

Pacific 
Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Subscription, $2.50 Per Year 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY 



Potomac Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



REWEMBER- 



The Fotomac has a producing plant in the Kern River field. 
The Potomac has a producing plant in the L,os Angeles field. 
The Potomac has a producing plant in the Summerland field. 
The Potomac has twenty-seven wells producing oil. 
The Potomac owns its properties and has no debts. 
The Potomac has an annual capacity of 360,000 barrels. 
The Potomac has an annual contract for 180,000 barrels. 
The Potomac has skilled operators drilling night and day. 
The Potomac has the very best of management. 
The Potomac has the finest equipment. 
The Potomac will soon double its production. 

The Potomac has the endorsement of bankers, manufacturers, mer- 
chants and investors generally. 
The Potomac is selling a small block of stock at 50 cents. 

MORE INFORMATION FOR THE ASKING. 

ADDRESS 

POTOMAC OIL COMPANY 

Potomac Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



DRILLING ENGINES 



THE CLOSE 

This is absolutely the quickest, most durable and handsomest engine 
on the market. Features no other engine has 

Second If and Drilling and 
Pumping Engine.s^^— — ^ 

Re-hauled and in perfect condition at rock bottom prices 

HERE'S YOUR CHANCE 



1 6 H. P. High Grade Gas Engine 
1 8 H. P. High Grade Gas Engine 



1 10 H. P. High Grade Oas Engine 
1 15 H. P. High Grade Gas Engine 



At wholesale or dealers' prices. These engines are new and guaranteed 

Address PENNSYLVANIA DRILLING CO. 

BAKERSF1ELD, CAL. 
r CLOSE & JAMES, Cor. Main and ALhambra streets, Loa An teles. Cal. 



1 



12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



THB EASTERN CONSOLIDATED. 



A Fake Concern That is Being 
Promoted By L. E. Pike & Co. 

L. E. Pike & Company of New 
York Chicago, Boston and other 
places, exploiters of several bogus 
copper and silver mining company 
schemes, are now devoting their 
entire efforts to selling shares in 
the Eastern Consolidated Oil com- 
pany, of California. 

L. E. Pike & Company have 
been engaged in this business for 
several years past, and there is no 
reliable commercial agency in the 
country that is not aware of the 
character and general standing of 
the firm. The New York Com- 
mercial publishes the following 
list of Pike's companies. Here 
are the names: 

Washington Copper & Milling Co 

STOCK WORTHLESS 

Urizona, Eastern & Montana .stock worthless 

tone Pine Mining Co stock worthless 

Diamond Star Oil Co nothing doing 

Eastern Star Oil Co nothing doing 

Central Star Oil Co nothing doing 

Federal Wireless Telephone & 

Telegraph Co nothing doing 

Eastern Consolidated Oil Co nothing doing 

The Los Angeles Times has 
published the following desciip- 
tion of the properties upon which 
the Eastern Consolidated Oil com- 
pany bases a capitalization of 
$5,000,000: 

L. K. Pike & Company, the brokerage 
firm of New York and elsewhere, have 
taken another California oil company to 
raise. The last unfortunate is the East- 
ern Consolidated, recently organized 
with a capital stock of $5,000,000, divided 
into 5,000,000 shares with a par value of 
$i each. 

The company is the owner of a tract 
of land in the local field which it pur- 
chased recently of the Rodeo and Rom- 
mel oil companies, and ten acres in Kern 
River, and both of these are in proved 
districts. It also controls 20,000 acres in 
Gaviota, but as yet no oil has been found 
there. With these modest holdings the 
company has placed its stock on the 
market through Pike & Company at 25 
cents_per share. 

But Pike & Company have done the 
rest. This firm has announced that from 
the company's three and cnly wells in 
the local field, the total production of 
which is 100 barrels a day when running 
at full speed, the company is already 
earning dividends at the rate of 2 per 
cent a month, or 24 per cent annually. 

The United States Investor, a 
financial paper of high standing 
published in Boston, made the 
following reply to a subscriber, 
who wrote to them for information 
in regard to this company: 

This stock is not all right as an invest- 
ment, and should be let severely alone. 
The prospectus and advertisement of I/. 
E. Pike & Company respecting the East- 
ern Consolidated company contain amass 
of glittering generalities which mean 
nothing. On the basis of the company's 
capitalization, $5,000,000, and the price 
asked for the stock, 25 cents, the prop- 
erty would be worth $1,250,000, which is 
practically more than any oil company 
today in California can be bought for. 

The statements of L. E. Pike & Com- 
pany are absolutely wild, and investors 
are likely to suffer in the purchase of 
any stocks they may offer for sale. 

Their latest proposition, the Eastern 
Consolidated, is in the same class with 
the Diamond Star, Eastern Star, and 
Central Star Oil companies promoted by 
them. The Eastern Consolidated has 
twenty acres of excellent territory in 



the Kern River field, worth about one- 
fifteenth of the capital stock, but the 
remainder of the great ho'.dings, we 
understand, do not count for much. 

The company is capitalized for ten 
times what it should be. 

The Pacific Oil Reporter 
warns people not to purchase 
stock from these financial broking 
sharks. 

A Business Change. 

The many friends of the well- 
known firm of the Parke & Lacy 
Company will be glad to know 
that this firm has not been effected 
by the recent death of its Presi- 
dent, Mr. B. T. Lacy, but will con- 
tinue in business in the same 
location under the firm name of 
Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

Of those who will carry on the 
businesshereafter, Mr. J.O. Harron 
and Mr. Thomas Rickard have 
long been associated with the old 
company and for the last few years 
they have been intrusted with its 
active management. They are, 
therefore, thoroughly conversant 
with the work they undertake and 
are well and favorably known. 
Nothing less can be said of Mr. A 
J. McCone, who although not here- 
tofore a resident of San Francisco, 
is known by many interested in 
mining as the successful proprie- 
tor of the Fulton Foundry, Vir- 
ginia City, Nevada, and Vice- 
President of the Fulton Engine 
Works, Los Angeles, Cal. He 
brings with him a host of friends 
to the new concern and a great 
fund of information for the benefit 
of its clients. 

The officers of the new company 
are as follows: J. O. Harron, Presi- 
dent; Thomas Rickard, First Vice- 
President; A. J McCone, Second 
Vice-President; Thos. Steel, Secre- 
tary; Louis C. Graupner and Jas. 
H. Mundy, Directors. The busi- 
ness will be continued at the old 
headquarters, 21-23 Fremont St., 
San Francisco, Cal., and branches 
will be conducted as before at 
room 306 Byrne Building, Los 
Angeles, Cal., and at Bakersfield, 
Cal. 

A New Company. 

The Pacific Underwriting and 
Trust company capitalized for 
$500,000 and having the follow- 
ing officers: J. C. Currier, presi- 
dent; H. W. Wright, secretary, E. 
D. Cooley, general manager, J. E. 
Firmstone, assistant secretary and 
James Armstrong, general agent, 
have arranged to purchase the 
capital stock and business of the 
Pacific Coast Underwriting com- 
pany. 

The new company will issue 
bonds maturing at different terms 
of years and drawing different 
rates of interest. Each and every 
bond issued, must be protected by 
collateral securities placed in the 
hands of the Germania Trust com- 
pany, trustee. Bonds will be fur- 
nished to guarantee the stocks 
and bonds of other corporations, 
having legitimate propositions to 
promote. People wishing to form 



ncorporations, may secure valu- 
able information by communicating 
with this company. 

All legitimate propositions: Min- 
ing, manufacturing, mercantile, 
railroads, patents, etc., can be suc- 
cessfully promoted by the methods 
of this company. Call or address: 

Home office, No. 507-8-9 Parrott 
building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Branch offices in all of the prin- 
cipal cities in the United States, 
Canada and England. 

Address all communications to 
the company. 



Bakersfield Refinery. 

The work of the Pacific Refin- 
ing company's plant near the 
western boundary of Bakersfield 
is progressing favorably, arid if all 
goes well as it should the company 
will be turning out a good quality 
of refined oil before the 1st of 
February. The spur from the 
Santa Fe has been completed to 
the works, the boilers have been 
installed in the building con- 
structed for them and the work- 
men are now vigorously prosecut- 
ing the building of the large 
barrel-house and the erection of 
the iron tanks. 

One 20,000-barrel tank for the 
storage of crude oil, and four 50CO- 
barrel tanks, for the storage of re- 
fined oil, will be constructed for 
immediate use. 

The stills have not yet arrived, 
though it is expected they will be 
placed on the ground before many 



days have passed. The plant, 
when completed, will be one of 
the best equipped concerns in the 
State. 



M. GROSSMAYER. 

CONTRACTOR FOR 

Drilling Oil Wells 




Box 213, 
Bakersfield, Cal. 

Room 17, 
1921 Chester Ave. 



M. lirossiiiaycr's Drilling Ou fit. 



Pacific Coast Underwriting Company. 

Incorporate companies; furnish 
everything complete. 

Sell interest-bearing Gold Bonds. 

Underwrite stocks. 

Buy and sell Oil Lands. 

Handle all kinds of mining 
properties. 

Information furnished investors 
regarding Pacific Coast Corpora- 
tions. Address, 

Main Office, 507-8-9 Parrott Bldg., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



BUY OR SELL 
CALIFORNIA 

OIL STOCKS 



THROUGH 



JOSEPH BJOPLITZ 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange, 
Member California Petroleum Miners' Association. 

330 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Orders for Buying and Selling California Oil Stocks 
Promptly Attended to. 

Reliable information on Oil Stocks Furnished Gratis. 

Unlisted Stocks a specialty. 

Correspondence Solicited. 

Reference — California Safe Deposit & Trust Co., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



For Sale Cheap 

1 5,(100 (or less) Shares Standard Con. 0. & L. Co. | 

Any Reasonable Offer Will Be Accepted 



eSSs&sssssssssssass ?«Sfe 



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References: San Francisco Banks. 



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I IJAMESR.T.MBRSHON1 1 

Stock Broker $ | 

t 537=538=539 PARROTT BUILDING $ g 

$E $ SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. W 

£3 tf/ «\ 



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tVJ ??• Authentic information furnished regarding corporations operatirg in the State of California -J^ 

& 4 is 

^0 •»• I have trustworthy data always available. "' flii 

cS *" ** ro 

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rv5i .?. Correspondence welcomed. "" CV5 

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14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



OIL DIRECTORY 



Leading Companies Now Operat- 
ing In California. 



r^AIvISTOGA Oil, AND DEVELOPMENT CO. 

500,000 shares par value $1. 
Operating on 2520 acres located in Napa, Yolo, 
Fresno, San Benito, Monterey and Kern counties. 
Officers: I, D Hitchcock, president; R B Todd, 
vice-president and manager; B F Edwards, 
secretary; J M Caselman, treasurer; Dr. H G 
Thomas and Dr. E J Boyes. San Francisco 
National Bank, depository. Office, 23 and 24 
Merchants Exchange, San Francisco, Cal. 



rf-^IYGNET PETROLEUM CO. 

Capital $150,000 

50,000 shares at $3. 

Location— Fresno county. 

Directors— Chas. L Fair, president, Blitz W Pax- 
ton, vice-president, Chas. A. Lee, treasurer, John 
C McElroy, secretary. 

Office— 561 Parrott Building. 

Tel.— South 184. 

pDYAMA VALLEY OIL COMPANY. 

Capital 1,000,000 

1,000,000 shares at $1.00. 

Location, 80 acres in. 4, 9-25 in Santa Barbara 
County and 80 acres in is, 10-24 in Kern County. 
Incorporated under the laws of South Dakota. 

Directors— W. H. Turner. President; Robt. 
Johnson, Secretary and Treasurer; Andrew 
Christensen, Frederick Misch, L- M. Hickox; 
Depository, Western National Bank. 

Pacific States Mining & Investment Company, 
fiscal agents. 

Office— 326 Post Street, San Francisco. 



WALDORF OIL AND ASPHALT COMPANY. 
Incorporated Feb 25, iqoi. Capital, $500,000 
500,000 "-hares at $1.00 per share. Place of busi- 
ness. H^nfnrd. Cal. Headquajters at McCord & 
Son. Location of lands, 1.2, o, Guadalupe. Santa 
Barbara county, Cal. Officers and directors: Geo 
B McCord, president, Hanford; Dr N P Duncan, 
vice-president, Hanford; J O Hickman, treas- 
urer, Hanfurd; Wm M Madden, attorney for com- 
pany. San Francisco; W H Worswick. field super- 
intendent. Hanford: F Brader, Hanford, N Wei<5- 
baum, Hanford, LS Chittenden, Hanford, W H 
Worswick, Jr, Hanford. Jas Manasse, secretary. 



ARIZONA INCORPORATIONS 



T\ABNEY OIL COMPANY. 

Incorporated. 
McKittrick district. 16 completed wells; no 
acres proven ground. 
Office, 330 Pine St., Room 5, San Francisco, Cal. 



G 



REAT NORTHERN OIL CO. OF OAKLAND 

Capital $250,000 

250,000 shares at $1 

125,000 shares of treasury stock, 

Location of property,* Glenn County, Calif,, 2,20a 

acres, near Elk Creek, in Stoney Creek Mineral 

district. 

Officers, B F Arnold, President, Geo A Gray 
Secretary. 
Office, 476 Teuth street, Oakland, 

OBISPO OIL COMPANY. Capital, $1,000,000. 
Number of shares, 1,000,000. Treasury 
stock, 550,000 shares. All stock fully paid and 
non-assessable. Incorporated under the laws of 
California. Properties in Kern, Fresno, San 
Benito and San Luis Obispo counties, Cal. In- 
corporators: G R Parkinson, President Bank of 
Palo Alto; Captain Frank Barrett. Palo Alto, Cal.; 
K W Brown, Fresno, Cal.; Chas E Bond, Minne- 
apolis, Minn,; C F Alderson Chicago, III, Offi- 
cers: John F Giles, president; Frank Barrett, 
vice president; Chas E Bond, treasurer; C F 
Aldeison, secretary, K W Browa, assistant secre- 
tary. Office, Suite 74. Citizens Bank building, 
119-121 La Salle street, Chicago, 111. 



OCCIDENTAL OIL COMPANY 
OF WEST VIRGINIA 

Capital stock, 600,000 shares par value, $1.00 

Officers— Wm. Crites, president; F M. Graham, 
vice-president; J. B. Batz, treasurer , C. E- Hail- 
stone, secretary; T. L- Moran,' manager; Kern 
Valley Bank, Cal.. depository. 

Mnstellar & Allen, San Francisco Agents, 34^ 
Parrott Bldg. Telephone, Jessie 1683. 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY. Cap'tal stock, 
j:2, 850,000; Par value, $1.00. Has 2.000 acres 
in Kern, Los Angeles and Suramerland fields, 
with 27 producing wells. Officers and directors: 
P V Schermerhorn, president; C H Ritchie, vice- 
president; R D Robinson, secretary and treas- 
urer; D M Schermerhorn and W S Morton. Priu 
cipal office. P otomac building, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Tel. John 2281. 



SALINAS OIL AND DEVELOPMENT COM- 
PANY. Capital, $1,000,000. 1,000.000 shares 
at $100. Land in Monterey county. Officers and 
directors: President, W N McCarthy. San Fran- 
cisco; vice-president, J J Gunn. Independence; 
treasurer, Wm N McCarthy; secretary. J B Olsen, 
San Francisco; superintendent, Jno CQuinn; C A 
Burchom, J E Baker, N A Dorn, W J Ellis and S 
S Simon, attorney, Hon Eugene F Bert, San Fran 
cisco Office, room 573-574 Parrott building, San 
Francisco. 



S 



URETY OIL COMPANY 



Capital $600,000 

600,000 shares par value $1.00 each. 

Location, 240 acres in section 20 and 29 T 3 N R 
16 W, S B M, Los Angeles County, Calif.,- Newhall 
district 

Officers and, Directors, M Esternaux. President, 
Geo. Greely King, Vice-President, T. H. Pearne, 
Secretary. D. A. Thieme, M. C. White. 

Farmers and Merchants Banks, depository. 

Office, 102 Henne Block, Los Angeles, Calif. 



S 



TANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 



Capital c J-too.ooo 

Treasury stock $150,000 

Location: 92 acres leased proven oil laud in 
McKittrick; 80 acres owned in Coalinga near 
Home Oil company. Fresno; 160 acres owned ad- 
joining oil well in Napa valley. 

Officers: R A Falkenberg, president; R L Fis- 
hy,' vice-president; M J Henry, secretary; J G 
Steele, treasurer; F Cooke-Caldwell, attorney for 
company. 

Offices: 475-76 Parrott Building, 85s Market 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



SUPERIOR OIL COMPANY. 

Capital stock, 500,000 shares, par value $1 each 

5960 acres of 1 u.d in the Sunset and McKittrick 
district. 

Two Standard rigs operating at present time. 

Officers and Directors — R S Aston, president; 
W Dixon, vice-president; J W Crosland, secretary 
and treasurer, Wm. M I^andess, W W Kelly and 
W G Wallace. Attorney, C C Cowgill. Office, No. 
17 Galtes block. Bakersfield. Cal 



U. 



S. OIL AND MINING CO. 



Capital $300,000 

Par value, $1 per share. 

Location: 320 acres in Kern River Distric 160 
acres in section 27, 11-24 Sunset district, near Blod- 
gett & Jewett wells, 110 acres onfractiont 26, 12-24, 
near Monarch, adjoining Jewett, Blodget & Beal 
gusher. L- M. Underwood, president, F Ketelhut 
secretary. 

Office— 211 19th street, Bskersfield.lCal, 



We make a specialty of chartering Ari- 
zona Corporations. Arizona has the 
most liberal laws in the United States- 
no taxes to pay, stock made non-assess- 
able, no personal liability for corporate 
debts. 

We take stock for our service, if you de- 
sire. We save you one-half the fees 
charged by others, and help you pro- 
mote your enterprise. We give you a 
certificate *hat you are duly incorpor- 
ated. All business attended to by an 
expert corporation lawyer. Correspond- 
ence solicited. 



THE WESTERN INVESTMENT CO 

Rooms 1 and 3, Porter Block 
PHOENIX - - ARIZONA 



Oil Prospectuses 

Booklets, Stock Certificates, Letterheads, Envelopes, Dodgers, 
Letter Circulars, etc., 



I 
I 
£ Printed at short notice and at reasonable prices. j£ 

I Pacific Oil Reporter Job Office | 

I Rooms 31, 32 and 33 | 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco | 



I 



4>'4^-'§^^*-'5^''fc!r#» , i^fe*''l^ , fe*»*^ 



l 



For Lease 

Twenty acres of absolutely proven oil 
land in McKittrick district to lease on 
royalty basis for development work. 
Chance for good, responsible driller. 
Securities required. 

For further particulars, address, 

W. G. KERCKHOFF 

Wilcox Block, Los Angeles. 



SUNSET 
LIMITED 



One of the most magnificent trains 
ever built. For 1901-1902 tri-weekly 
via Coast Line and Sunset Route for 

NEW ORLEANS and 

NEW YORK 

Leave SAN FRANCISCO 4:50 p.m. 
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays. 

Leave LOS ANGELES 8:30 p. m. 
Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays. 

Arrive NEW ORLEANS 7:20 p. m. 
Thursdays, Saturdays, Mondays. 

Among the world's noted Highways of 
Travel not one equals the route of this 
train. Get the little book, " Wayside 
Notes," from any agent of the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Initial trip of Sunset Limited 
Friday, Dec. 6, from San Francisco. 



Oil Stocks 

Sold in New York and all Eastern 
Markets. Oil, copper and gold com- 
panies financed. 

Hillyer, Clarke & Co.. 

Bankers and Brokers, 
52 Broadway, New York. 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wrench SS^S 




Drilllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND "MONEY SAVED. 
It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits. 
You simply change the top plate's, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Oil Well Casing Oil St lis 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets. P. O. Box 231 

Telephone, Main 196. Baker Block. Station C 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 




Business College and 
School of Engineering 



24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

THE CIVIL ENGINEERING COURSE includes Geometry, Trigonometry, Draughtins 
Strength of Matenals. and Surveying. J . 

THE MINING ENGINEERING COURSE includes Assaying, Blow Pipe Analysis. Mill Con- 
struction, Milling. Miuing. Ge-.lngv, Mineralogy, Economic Geology. Surveyiogand Mathematics 

ELECTRICAL AND ENGINEERING COURSE Electrical Engineering, Theoretical and 
ractical. Work Shop audMboralory Practice Construction. Mechanical Drawing, Mathematics etc 

THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT of this College affords unexcelled opportunities for 
the acquisition of a business education. Day and Evening Classes. 

8®"Write for new 80-page Catalogue and College Journal. 




For prices, etc, inquire 



W. FORGIE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil & Gas Well Rig Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., Sa,n, 
Francisco, Cal., Bakersfield, Cal. 



PACFIC OIL REPORTER. 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Crane co. 

H. T. LALLY, Manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. 
24 FREMONT ST. 



San Francisco,' Cal 




Smith=Premier £ 
Typewriters J 

Are Used Everywhere 

READ THIS LIST: 
Heald's Business College use.. 30 
Southern Pacibc Co. system . .47 

Western Union Tel. Co 36 

S. F. Public Schools now use. . .43 
S. F.Call " ....« 



Hale Bros 

Viavi Co 

Cogswell College 

Miller, Scott & Sloss 



...14 
...13 
...n 
.. .10 



Get information from us about 
the new SPEED Device. 

L. A H. ALEXANDER & CO. 

no Montgomery st., S. F. 

VWVVVVAVVVVVVWS'yVVVVW 



American Tool Works A s C00PER - c ■ "■ M E 



JOSEPH EASTWOOD. Proprietor. 



MANfFACTfRKRS OF 



All Sizes of Hoagland's Patent Casing 
Spears Top Rent 

109=111 Mission Street, 

Bet. Spear and Main 

Telephone, Main 5578. 



Patent 
Redwood 




-*^ " i 

^ « w 






P3 









S I 

.2 in 

*| 

a en 

« p 



42 feet diameter. 18 feet high. Capacity, 177,500 gallons. 



Atlas Pipe Wrench^C 

Received highest award at Pan-American Hxporition, Buffal t, N. Y. t 1901. 



IT HAS w , 

no equal yn. 




am 

Made in four sizes — 10, 18, 24 and 36 inches. 

Atlas Tube Cleaner 

Received highest award at Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, N. Y„ 1901 



NO THREADS 
TO STRIP 



nnnnnnaannoQnnnnnun nannon o 
n n 

g Before buying Oil Stock or g 

□ leasing or buying Oil Lands n 
g call on A. BARIEAU, Room g 
g 23 Columbian Building, o.i6g 

□ Market Street, San Franciscon 
a a 

rjnnnnQnnnnnDDnnnnDDijnnnnpD 



For Water=tube 
Boilers 




It Has No 
Equal 



Write for circulars. Ask your supply man. 
Manufactured by 

ATLAS PIPE WRENCH CO. Flood £„ u £*, 



New York Office, 121 Liberty Street 



San Francisco. 
Works, New Haven, Conn. 



219 Crocker Bulldltj£ 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Standard and Special Drilling Tools ,. 



SPECIALTIES 

troleum Oil, Asphaltum and 
kindred hydrocarbons 



OIL TANKS 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

We carry the uargen Slock. Our price, in 
Kq ■■■■ 



Kquitalile. 



Tel. Main. 1133. 



When you want to swear go to 

LEE D. CRAIG 

Notary Public and 
Commissioner of Deeds 



316 Montgomery St. 

bet. California 

and Pine, San Francisco. 



The Road to Wealth 

Headquarters School and Governmea 
Lands. 

Lands all counties in California. No conditions 
on School Lands as to residence or cultivation 
Only $1.25 an acre. Locati„^.j in all Mineral Belt. 
—Kern River, McKittrick, Devil's Den, Mojave. 
Sunset, *Joalinga and other famous districts. The 
Cheapest, Safest and Surest Investment in Amer- 
ca. Send Stamp for Land Book. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, California. 

400,000 Shares of Oil Stock 



DIVIDENDS. 

Dividend No. I was declared by the Ventura 
Consolidated Crude Oil Company Nov. 15th. 
Regular dividends will be paid quarierly here- 
after. Company has 4 producing wells No. 5 
drilling; 2720 acres of oil laud; also rich gold mine 
in Arizona. To continue rapid development 
work a block of treasury stock is being sold at 
20 cents per share, par value, $1.00. — Pull paid— 
Non-assessable. Reliable agent wanted. Ad- 
dress all orders for stock or further particulars to 

W. G. YOUNG & CO., 

Fiscal Agents. 
628-30 Laughlin Bldg., Los Angeles, C»l. 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machin The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 

ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. Its tests range from shallow water wells to a linvt of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 

recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are simple, 
powerful aud efficient, easy to h.andle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Territory 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



George H. Tay Company 

49 to 53 First St., San Francisco 



Crude Oil Fuel Burning Plants for Boilers, Furnaces and 
Ovens. Boilers, Engines, Oil Storage and Wagon Tanks, 
Retiring Equipment, Oil, Gas and Artesian Well Sup= 
plies of every description. 

Austin's Standard Drilling Ma= 
chinery, Austi n's Latest Im = 
proved Comb ination Drilling Ma= 
chinery, for any size and depth 

Austin's Portable Drilling Rigs 

MADE IN SIZES TO SUIT TERRITORY \ SIMPLE POWERFUL EFFICIENT 

Drilling and Fishing Tools T^^&tl^ 

...BRASS AND IRON VALVES,.. 

OIL WELL CASING «$-: TUBING ££ DRIVE AND LINE PIPE 

Catalogues, Estimates and Specifications furnished on application 




REFINING OIL 



THE PRINCE OF MONEYMAKERS 



FUEL OIL 



BANKERS & BROKERS OIL COMPANY. 



TREASURY STOCK NOW OFFERED 
AT THE LOW PRICE OF 



15 cents per share 



PAR VALUE Si EACH; FULLY PAID 
AND NON-ASSESSABLE 



No opportunity equal to this one has ever been offered to the public. AN ABSOLUTELY SAFE AND SURE INVESTMENT, combined with practically cer- 
tain enormous profits. The Sunset-Midway belt is tried, known and proven. The company's flowing wells when brought in in a lev/days guarantee your investment 
and there is still room for loo wells on this property, also the company owns iooo acres in San Benito District, famous for high grade refining oil, and lease on So acres 
in the famous Kern River belt. 

Refining and fuel oil is Steadily advancing in price right along and has always a value of several times of what it costs to pro- 
duce it. All of the company's holdings are in proven oil belts and are so located that oil can be piped out. The company is in the hands of 
men of integrity and experience in the oil business, and it is not at all impossible that these shares will be worth $10.00 each in one year. 

The stock is being purchased by the most conservative investors, a large block having just been taken by some of the 
most prominent capitalists of Philadelphia and Boston. Buy now and share in the coming dividends. Great fortunes have been and are 
now being made in OIL. WHY NOT YOU ? Send remittances by usaal methods, payable to the order of 

J. W. HEISNER & CO., Financial Agents, 612 Parrott Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 

References by permission: Merchants National Bank, Portland, Or.; Western National Bank, San Francisco, Cal. 




DON'T FORGET 

Harron, Rickard & McCone 

With Large Stocks at 
BAKERSFIELD AND SAN FRANCISCO 



Will Fill Your Orders for 



OIL WELL SUPPLIES 



Promptly at Proper Prices 



21 Fremont Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



16 Fish Building 
BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 



Endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association 







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December ist. 1901, San Francisco had ONE TELEPHONE to every 12 people. 
January ist. 1901, St, Petersburg, (Russia), had one telephone to every 283 people. 



Vienna, (Austria), . 
London, (England), 
Philadelphia, (Pa.), 
Paris, (France), 
Chicago, (111.), 
New York City, 
Stockholm, (Sweden), 



had one telephone to every 120 people, 
had one telephone to every in people, 
had one telephone to every 96 people, 
had one telephone to every 82 people, 
had one telephone to every 64 people, 
had one telephone to. every 49 people, 
had one telephone to every 13 people. 



DURING 1902 WE HOPE TO PLACE A TELEPHONE IN 
EVERY HOUSEHOLD IN SAN FRANCISCO 



Pacific States Telephone and Telegraph Company 

216 BUSH STREET, San Francisco 



H 
If 
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m 

m 

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$100 BUYS 

200 SHARES 
OIL STOCKS 

_n Ai Oil Company; 200 barrel well. Stock sold in lots 
of $100 and up. Guaranteed against loss by 

Security Gold Bond 

Indorsed by a Trust Company of $1,000,000 paid up capi- 
tal. Cash returned at maturity of bond. Safe, legitimate. 
Investigate. Stock shares in all dividends and profits. 
Handsome illustrated booklets of oil fields, with official 
map, for 10 cents in stamps. 

ILLINOIS OIL BOND COMPANY 

Room 506, 167 Dearborn Street, Chicogo. 

Home Office, Room 7, first floor, Mills Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



J 

i 
f 

$ 



THE BEST CASING PULLER 



The Norton Ratchet Jack 

With Ring and Slips for Pulling 
Casing. 



ALWAYS SAFE, READY AND EFFECTIVE 



This jack is self lubricating, pro- 
vided with ball bearings, giving 
maximum of efficiency with mini- 
mum of friction. No blocking re- 
quired, as the hold of the ring and 
slips is absolute. Convenient to 
operate, light and durable. For 
prices and particulars address 

M. G. WEST, 216 California Street, San Francisco. 




Bovaird & Seyfang Mf'g Co. 



I 

% 

$ 

1 



■ MANUFACTURERS OF ■ 



Stationary and Portable Boilers, Steam Engines, 

Iron Tanks, Rig Iron Outfits, Drilling and Fish ng Tools, 

And everything needed to drill and operate 



Oil, Gas and Artesian Wells 

Manufacturers' Agents for Tubing, Casing, Pipe Fittings, Valves, Etc. 

Natural Gas Plants a Specialty. 

Cable address, "Boang." ABC and Private Codes. 

BRADFORD, PA-, U. S- A. 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 3. N 



PRANCISCO. CAI*. FRIDAY, DECEMBER ao. igoi. 



Prick, Trn C 



A GREAT INVENTION. 



Kerosene Taking the Place of Gas and 
Electricity. 

An Invention That Promises to Largely Increase the 
Demand for California Petroleum. 



Witbio the last three months tion to advantage a "system" has 

an invention has been perfected to be installed. A system consi>ts 

in New Yo-k which is having a of one or more fixtures, or lamps, 

great 1 ftVct on the consumption to which ordiuary kerosene is con- 

of refined petroleum. veyed through tubing from a tank 

At the present time gas and which is at a distance from it. 
electricity are having a battle It is necessary to install a sys- 

royal in order to win the favor of tern in a building, and when in- 



public opinion as regards illumina- 
tion, especially for street lighting 
and for the illumination of large 
halls and public buildings. 

So far as street lighting is con- 
cerned, up to the present time 
kerosene as generally used has 
been confined to small lamps 
which, enclosed in glass protec- 
tors shed a dim light over the 
path of the luckless wayfarer. 

In public halls so far as the use 
of kerosene for lighting purposes 
is concerned, the general method 
has been to utilize a chandalier 
holding a number of lamps, or 
else by using lamps fixed to the 
walls on which were fastened re- 
flectors which cast the light glar- 
ingly in the eyes of those who 
might unfortunately happen to 
sit in the direction of the reflec- 
tion. 

Ever) body knows the incon- 
veniences attending the use of 
kerosene, especially as compared 
with gas or electricity. It not 
only means labor, but it means 
dirt, odor, and lack of proper il- 
lumination. 

Within the last few months, an 
invention has been perfected by 
which kerosene can be used in 
such a way that a kerosene street 
light system can be installed 
which will equal in every respect 
that of gas or electricity. 

The system has been perfected 
so that public buildings, theatres, 
churches, music halls and the like 
can be lighted by kerosene as 
brilliantly as by gas or electricity. 
This invention is just beginning 
to be appreciated. At present its 
use has been confined almost en- 
tirely to New York, but there its 
usefulness is beginning to be un- 
derstood and a large number of 
wholesale, retail, and manufac- 
turing establishments are making 
use of it. 

By its use kerosene not only 
gives "s much illuminating power 
as gas or electricity, but the ex- 
pense of lighting is reduced by 
more than one-half. 
In order to use the new inven- 



stalled it becomes a permanent 
affair. The system, or plant, con- 
sists of lamps, tubing and tank. 

A tank thoroughly tested to 
withstand a pressure of at least 
sixty pounds is half filled with 
kerosene, in the remaining half air 
is pumped in exactly the same 
way that a bicycle tire is inflated. 

The air pressure forces the oil 
through the tubing to the lamps 
where it is vaporized wiih heat 
and mixed with atmospheric air 
and burned under a mantel. The 
tank in which the oil is kept may 
be placed wherever the user 
deems it most desirable, whether 
it be out of doors, in the cellar, 
up stairs, in fact in any convenient 
place out of the way of meddlers. 

The tubing through which the 
oil is forced to the lamps is of 
bronze, is practicable, indestruc- 
tible, is almost as flexible as the 
ordinary electric colored wire, and 
is made in three sizes, the largest 
size being a little larger than the 
ordinary sixpenny wire nail. 

The installation is very simple 
and inexpensive, and can be made 
by any intelligent mechanic when 
furnished with ordinary instruc- 
tions. The tubing can be con- 
cealed under moulding in the 
method used by electric com- 
panies. 

The cost of operating this sys- 
tem is wonderfully small. A lamp 
equal to five thousand candle- 
power burns only one quart of 
kerosene in seven hours and fif- 
teen minues, or one gallon in 
in twenty-nine hours, conse- 
quently if burned eight hours per 
night every night in the month it 
would consume about eight gal- 
lons which at the rate of twelve 
cents amounts to ninety-six cents. 
Allowing thirty-five cents for ex- 
tras, this would bring the total 
cost to $1.31 (Eastern). 

It is safe to say that it will not 
cost more than $1.50 per month to 
operate a light equal to a 2000 can- 
dle-power electric arc light. This 
means that the maximum cost of 



ting the newly invented 
■cne lamp would be $i.s pel 
year. 

To obtain the same results with 
gas at $1 pei M woo 565. 

The ordinary Wellsbach light 
would cost $233 Go. 

The incandescent electric light 
at $006 per H would cost $536.35. 

The electric arc light, giving the 
same amount of light, at $.06 per 
II would cost $164.25. 

If ordinary oil wick lamps were 
used, to obtain the same amount 
of light, would cost $219. 

So far as equipment is concerned, 
towns and cities can save in 
p'imary outlay alone, as against 
gas or electricity, not less than 
fifty per cent. 

Towns and cities which are now 
burdened by the excessive rate of 
gas or electrical companies should 
make a careful investigation of 
this new invention which bids fair 
to revolutionize the illumination 
industry. 

The only adverse criticism which 
can be urged against this inven- 
tion is that the eastern supply of 
crude oil seems to be rapidly 
diminishing, and should the de- 
mand for refined petroleum in- 
crease appreciably the cost of the 
product would increase corre- 
spondingly. 

On the other hand it is urged 
that while the old oil fields are 
being worked out, new fields are 
being rapidly developed. 

Of these new fields, none has a 
better future than California, and 
should the new invention come to 
general use for exterior and in- 
terior illumination the result 
would be a large increase in the 
demand for California oil. 



OIL BARr.B LOST. 

She Wei Loaded With Texas 
CPOda Petroleum. 

The J. M. GufTey Petroleum 
company has received a telegram 
from the Fuel Oil and Transit 
company of Mobile, Ala., stating 
that the oil barge. Helen Bock, 
was lost at sea during Sunday 
night's storm, off the Louisiana 
coast. 

The Helen Buck was loaded last 
week with 9500 barrels of crude 
petroleum by the J. M. Guffey 
Petroleum company and sailed for 
Gretten, La, where the C.ufTey 
Storage tanks are located. The 
boat was a dismantled schooner 
converted into an oil barge and 
owned by Spotswood & Co, of 
Mobile, Ala. There was no in- 
formation received regarding the 
crew but it is presumed that they 
were saved on the tug. 

While under ordinary circum- 
stances the loss of a barge of the 
capacity of the Helen Buck would 
not amount to very much but at 
this stage the scope and develop- 
ment of the field is based entirely 
upon the transportation facilities 
and the loss of anything in that 
line is a very serious matter to 
the shippers. 



Oil Vs. Electricity. 

Petroleum incandescent lighting 
in France is making rapid pro- 
gress, says the London Petroleum 
Review. The mines at Marie 
have adopted this mode of light- 
ing. The Northern Railway of 
France makes use of it for its 
station, and at the arrival of the 
Czar at Dunkirk, the station and 
pier were illuminated by fifty 
Washington lamps, which pro- 
duced a fine show. From the in- 
dustrial point of vier", it is inter- 
esting to note the tendency to 
discard electricity in favor of pe- 
troleum incandescent lighting. 
Large works, like those of De 
Dion Bouton, are on the point of 
abandoning electricity,, which is 
found to be too dear. It is also 
mentioned that a large chocolate 
merchant in the Rue de Rivoli 
has obtained, at a monthly ex- 
pense of 180 francs, the same 
amount of light, which, by elec- 
tricity, cost him from 500 francs to 
600 francs, representing a saving 
of one-half to two-thirds. 



Los Angeles Stocks. 

Trading on the Los Angeles 
Stock Exchange during the week 
just passed was rather below the 
average in amount. Some few oil 
stocks made spasmodic advances 
on buying orders but these fell 
back again to their former level 
and the general tendency of the 
market was sluggish. 

Reed Crude sold at 34 early in 
the week and was gradually ham- 
mered to 333^ at the close. Several 
thousands of shares changed hands 
at these figures. Southern Con 
solidated was bid up a fraction 
although no trading resulted. 
Senator is offered as low as 75 
cents which is a very material 
decline. Unable to maintain its 
advance of a week ago Westlake 
gas again dropped off to about 5^ 
to 6 cents. 

Among the mining stocks Butte 
Lode has been most active al- 
though there is an increased 
demand for Verde King, South 
Bisbee, Black Hills Copper and 
several others of the better known 
stocks. 

Boring for oil has commenced in 
two places in the newly discovered 
Kintla oil district, thirty miles 
north of Kalispell, Mont. The 
new field is thirty miles north ana 
south and ten east and west, with 
the Flathead riverrunningthrough 
the center. Springs in this sec- 
tion are numerous. The oil has a 
paraffine base and runs very high 
in illuminating oils. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



SHOULD FEEL PROUD. 

The Railroad Witnesses Shown 
Up in a New Light. 

Some of the witnesses furnished 
by the railroad in the recent oil 
rate case before the railroad com- 
missioners will appreciate the fol- 
lowing from the " Paint, Oil and 
Drug Review," a Chicago publi- 
cation. 

An oil rate comedy is on the 
boards in California and funny 
turns are being done by the per- 
formers, chief of which are the 
railroad commissioners of that 
state and the Southern Pacific 
retinue of witnesses. 

It appears that the State Rail- 
road Commission, after having 
made a small reduction in oil rates, 
suddenly set the decision aside 
and called for a rehearing, the 
commissioners stating that the re- 
hearing was granted at the re- 
quest of the railroads in order to 
permit the oil men to make a bet- 
ter showing. As it was the first 
time on record that the loser in a 
freight-rate contest ever asked for 
a new trial for the purpose of giv- 
ing the winner an opportunity of 
securing a bigger cut in the rates, 
it was recognized that the com- 
mission had introduced a novelty 
in its business and that the vaude- 
ville stage was no longer to have 
a monopoly of original stunts. 

Since the rehearing has gotten 
under way, enough has been 
brought forth to satisfy the most 
ardent expectations of comedy. 
As a Nat Goodwin-Sol Smith Rus- 
sell-Gus William-Ezra Kendall 
all-star combination the present 
amusement effort at 'Frisco is 
destined to be a world-beater. In 
the fiist place, to the surprise of 
the commission, the oil men have 
really strengthened their case by 
producing evidence from Traffic 
Manager Bissel of the Santa Fe 
road to the effect that while the 
Southern Pacific charges the gen- 
eral oil traffic from $5 to $7 per 
car for hauling over the Kern dis- 
trict switch, it charges the Santa 
Fe road only $1.50 per car for the 
same service. Here is a gross dis- 
crimination in rates, and a proof 
that the Southern Pacific makes a 
charge of as much as $7 for a ser- 
vice it can afford to render and 
does render to certain parties for 
$1.50 or $5.50 less. 

But the real fun commenced 
when the witnesses for the South- 
ern Pacific came to the front with 
their original and highly comic 
stunts. These witnesses one and 
all gave solemn seeming and high 
sounding reasons in support of 
the doctrine that cheap freight 
rates would be injurious to pro- 
ducers and to consumers. That 
view being correct, how ignorant 
and deluded have the shipping 
public been up to this time. From 
time immemorial it has been be- 
lieved that anything which cheap- 
ened transportation was a public 
benefit. In that belief men of all 
times and all nations have labored 



to improve their roads, toconstruct 
bridges and in every way to facili- 
tate traffic. It was for that they 
substituted the locomotive for the 
stage coach and the steamboat for 
the sailing vessel. Nowthe South- 
ern Pacific people have discovered 
that this was all wrong. High 
freights are at bottom a public 
blessing, although the surface ap- 
pearances lead superficial reasoners 
to believe the contrary. 

The witnesses who were brought 
in to sustain the new doctrine 
were from Los Angeles. They 
admitted that cheaper rates would 
admit the Kern wells to compete 
with the Los Angeles wells, and 
possibly that fact may have some- 
thing to do with their opinion that 
high freight rates are necessary 
for the welfare of Kern. One of 
the witnesses said: "In my 
opinion a low freight rate tends 
to reduce the price of oil and 
brings no benefit to either the pro- 
ducer or the consumer." Another 
said that if low rates were estab- 
lished "consumers would hesitate 
to install an oil plant for fear the 
price of oil would go down." A 
third witness declared the oil men 
ought to form a combination to 
store and control the output, that 
the present way of doing business 
is a waste of money. Lastly, 
there was a witness who declared 
that even if the railroads and the 
producers were equitably compen- 
sated, lower freight rates and 
lower prices of oil to the consumer 
would not benefit the community. 

From all that testimony pre- 
sented and the conclusions drawn 
therefrom, it would appear that 
the reason California has not 
developed manufacturing enter- 
prises is because fuel and freight 
rates have been too cheap. Were 
the railroads to make them still 
cheaper nobody would install an 
oil plant. The discovery of oil is 
a menace to the industries of the 
Golden State and the only way 
Californians can stave off impend- 
ing ruin is to apply to the Southern 
Pacific railroad ccmpany to act 
the philanthropist and fix rates so 
high that oil cannot be furnished 
to the consumer for le. c s than 
present prices. 

True this new theory turns all 
established principles of economics 
topsy turvy and may in the long 
run excite yearnings for an aboli- 
tion of railroads and a return to 
ox team, but we understand that 
eminent economists of the new 
school, such as Dooley, Twain, 
Perkins, et al. stand ready to en- 
dorse it. Then there is a suspicion 
that the reason why the Southern 
Pacific hauls oil for the Santa Fe 
at $1.50 per car while charging oil 
men $7 is an expectation that the 
cheap haul and cheap fuel will 
ruin the Santa Fe and thus, rid 
the Southern Pacific of competi- 
tion. There is no telling what 
this new doctrine will accomplish 
in the way of results. High tariff 
taxes has made America very pros- 
perous, now high freight rates 



will increase the prosperity. Cali- 
fornia railroads are giving their 
share of the increase with a jump. 
Funny that the oil men can't see 
it in a proper light. 

November Pipe Line Report. 

While there was only a small 
decline in the demand for Penn- 
sylvania oil during November, the 
runs showed a heavy decrease, 
and the net stocks suffered an- 
other reduction, amounting to over 
600,000 barrels, or more than) 20,- 
000 barrels a day. On the other 
hand, the runs of Lima oil were 
nearly 8000 barrels a day in excess 
of the demand, and the Buckeye 
stocks registered an increase of 
over 200,000 barrels. This condi- 
tion of affairs has prevailed, with 
few exceptions, during the entire 
year, the Pennsylvania stocks de- 
clining, while the Buckeye stocks 
have been on the increase. Since 
Dec. 31, 1900, the Pennsylvania 
stocks have decreased 3,195,789 
barrels, while the stocks of Lima oil 
have made a gain of 2,581.391 bar- 
rels. The aggregate loss in stocks 



since the beginning of the year 
was 614,398 barrels, and the stocks 
at the close of November were the 
smallest of the current year. — Oil 
City Derrick. 

Cheap Gas. 

A process has lately been in- 
vented by J. G. Clark, of Marion, 
Ind., whereby it is claimed gas 
can be made from crude oil at a 
cost of less than two cents per 
7,000 feet. A practical test was 
made at Summitville in the pres- 
ence of a number of manufacturers. 
The gas generated is said to have 
more heating power than either 
coal or natural gas. 



The impression having gained a 
foothold among Missouri people 
that there is either oil or gas 
underlying that region, a number 
assembled and organized a com- 
pany capitalized at $5000 for the 
purpose of prospecting. Drilling 
will begin at once. Sufficient 
stock was subscribed to insure the 
success of the prospecting stage of 
the business. 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY 



Potomac Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



-REWEMBER- 

The Potomac has a producing plant in the Kern River field. 
The Potomac has a producing plant in the Los Angeles field. 
The Potomac has a producing plant in the Summerland field. 
The Potomac has twenty-seven wells producing oil. 
The Potomac owns its properties and has no debts. 
The Potomac has an annual capacity of 360,000 barrels. 
The Potomac has an annual contract for 180,000 barrels. 
The Potomac has skilled operators drilling night and day. 
The Potomac has the very best of management. 
The Potomac has the finest equipment. 
The Potomac will soon double its production. 

The Potomac has the endorsement of bankers, manufacturers, mer- 
chants and investors generally. 
The Potomac is selling a small block of stock at 50 cents. 

MORE INFORMATION FOR THE ASKING. 

ADDRESS 

POTOMAC OIL COMPANY 

Potomac Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



DRILLING ENGINES 



THE CLOSE 

This is absolutely the quickest, most durable and handsomest engine 
on the maiket. Features no other engine has . . 

Second Hand Drilling and 
Pumping Engines^^— 

Re-hauled and in perfect condition at rock bottom prices 

HERB'S YOUR CHANCE 



1 6 H. P. High Grade Gas Engine 
1 8 H. P. High Grade Gas Engine 



1 10 H. P. High Grade (Sas Engine 
r 15 H. P. High Grade Gas Engine 



At wholesale or dealers' prices. These engines are new and guaranteed 

Address PENNSYLVANIA DRILLING CO. 

BAKERSF1ELD, CAL. 
Or CLOSE & JAMES, Cor. Main and Alhambra streets, Los Angeles, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



GOOD WORDS. 






What a Boston Journal Say* of 
Our Oil InduHlry. 

The Journal fcr Invcs: 
financial paper published in Bos- 
ton which devotes considerable at- 
tention to oil. 

Its last issne contained the fol- 
lowing concerning the oil indus- 
try of California: 

The oil industry in California 
was born at a time when Ihe state 
was face to face with the problem 
of a cheaper fuel, and it has never 
flagged for a day. nor havethe en- 
terprisingmenaod women whofirst 
gave their money and influence to 
its development lost courage for a 
moment. Its history for the past 
four years is one to be proud of. 
The rapidity of its achievements 
has no parallel in the history of 
the world. Within the brief space 
of four years it has developed 
gigantic proportions. 

Today there are 172S operating 
wells in the state, and 500 more in 
process of drilling. The output is 
more than 600,000 barrels per 
month, all of which finds a ready 
market at an average price of 45 
cents per barrel, From the San 
Diego field on the south to the 
Shasta on the north, embracing 23 
oil districts, these figures prevail. 
The Standard Oil Company pur- 
chase all of the Ventura and Coal- 
inga oil for refining, at an average 
price of 62 y 2 cents. 

The Standard ( il Company has 
purchased 70 acres of land at 
Point Richmond, the terminal of 
the Santa Fe railroad, for the ex- 
press purpose of erecting one of 
the largest refineries in the United 
States. There are at prestnt 10 
petroleum refineries in the state. 
The total amount of distillates is 
159,800 barrels. The capacity in 
storage tanks is 262,425 barrels. 
The average grade of oil through- 
out the state is registered at 22 5 B. 
These crude oils, which are of as-. 
phaltic base, are combined with 
high boiling members of the hydro- 
carbon series, and are so consti- 
tuted as to make the process of re- 
fining somewhat difficult. Never- 
theless, the work is going on to 
as full an extent as the present 
facilities for refining will admit. 

The demand for fuel oil is far in 
excess of the present output. 
There are now 21 large corpora- 
tions in California that use 414,000 
barrels of oil yearly. There are 
other large firms that would be 
glad to change to the use of oil if 
oil could be obtained. The use of 
oil for fuel in the place of coal 
shows a saving of 48 per cent in 
the generation of steam. 

There are several large compa- 
nies in California who, having de- 
cided to bum oil, are waiting for 
an opportunity to make a contract 
for a certain quantity per month, 
on long time. The Santa Fe com- 
pany has demonstrated that it can 
use oil at a saving of 40 per cent 
over coal, paying 50 cents per bar- 
rel for crude oil. The Southern 



9»6 engines a- fast as the supply 
lof oil will warrant i' in so doing, 
and when the work of changing 
is done that road alone will be con- 
suming more than 4.500,(00 bar 
■ rcls of oil per annum. From what 
principle of common sense shall 
we draw the conclusion that busi- 
ness men will neglect the si. 
tution of oil for coal, when such a 
change will be a saving of 40 per 
cent in the cost of fuel? 

In conclusion it will not be amiss 
to say that California oils have a 
ready market, at a good, reason- 
able price. The industry is on a 
more permanent financial basis to- 
day than ever. There are more 
than 200 companies paying divi- 
dends, millions of dollars are being 
exchanged for oil securities, hun- 
dreds of wells are being drilled, 
with the assurance of a ready mar- 
ket for their oil when it is ob- 
tained. 



\N 1,1 HIM, Till, M OUT. 

I M-iio^ J. .million* Forcing Weak 
.panic* Out of Kunln 



eluded, have traded u] 

h the result that all 
been affected bj a decline 
me general. 



In the Devil's Den. 

According to the Southern ad- 
vices, the Sanborn companv has 
preparations well under way for 
the development of a tract in the 
Devil's Den district in North- 
western Kern. For reasons not 
explained this district has not 
kept pace with the other fields of 
the county, though rumors of 
strikes have frequently been re- 
ported from the locality. The 
Spreckels invaded the section two 
years ago and have been at work 
since, but as to the success of the 
development work very little has 
been made public. Those inter- 
ested in the Sanborn company 
have gone over the ground and, 
judged from the surface indica- 
cations, are certain that the oil belt 
continues north along the west 
side, including what is known as 
the Devil's Den. They have pur- 
chased the drilling outfit of the 
Gibbs Oil company and will re- 
move it to its holdings on 36, 26- 
17. As soon as the machinery is 
put in place the work of drilling 
will be commenced. 



agrees with the Los Anv. 
Times when it soys the weeding 
: unsubstantial oil companies 
is about to begin in earnest, and 1 
dieted that by Janu- 
ary 1st many helpless and hopeless | 
oil operator will have given up' 
the struggle. 

The exri boot to hap 

..,._. , and her Inends. 

pen in the Kern River field, where 

sonic high royalty leases will be 
surrendered. Months ago over- 
enthusiastic promoters agreed to 
almost everything to obtain a foot- 
hold in the great Kern River field, 
but since then they have failed to 
fulfill the terms of their leases, 
which called for the drilling of a 
given number of wells that seemed 
reasonable at the time contracts 
were made, but which is now out 
of the question. For such opera- 
tors there is nothing left but to 
retire. 

The weeding out of such com- 
panies is bound to bring about a 
better condition in the field, as it 
cannot be denied that it was the 
weak companies that demoralized 
the condition of the fuel oil 
market. They were originally 
launched with the expectation 
that the first well would furnish 
the funds for the second, and so 
on, but this hope having failed, 
they have been driven to part 
with their oil at any, even ruinous, 
prices. Buyers, the Standard in- 



Rlches in Oil Lands 
Rich oil strikes rted 

from Uinta county. Wyoming;, in 

which twenty-two Merced people 
are iotereSle I, A brother of Mis. 
A. s. De Voe. now of Merced, is 
an oil expert, and he located 
acres in Uinta county for his sister 
"The land is now- 
very valuable — will sell at from 
$500 to $1000 per acre iii boom 
time next Bummer," l lie brother 
w litis Mis. De Voe. The land 
cost the Mercediles $5 for each 20 
and two months alter they 
acquired it they rejected an offer 
ol -,15 per acre. The brother, Mr. 
Anderson, sold a tract of like land 
recently to Cbanslor, Can field & 
Butler of California foi $1000 per 
acre. — Modesto Herald. 



Oil Dividends Poid in November. 

Central Point Con $3, 800 

Han ford $2,000 

Home $7,500 

Oil City Petroleum $2,500 

San Joaquin $5,000 

Senator $1,810 

West .Shore $5,000 



Hundreds of claims are being 
located in the new oil fields near 
Opal, Utah, on the Oregon Short 
Line railroad. Those who are 
working there claim that the same 
conditions exist as in the Fossil 
fields. 



Coalinga Pipe Line 

R. V. Ellis, president of the 
Home Oil Company, is authority 
for the statement that unless the 
Southern Pacific agrees to supply 
cars at once, the Home company 
and the Cbanslor & Canfield in- 
terests will begin a pipe line with- 
out delay. He is reported to have 
talked with the Southern Pacific 
officials, and offered to buy cars to 
transport oil from the field, but the 
company refused to handle them, 
giving, it is said, no reason for de- 
nying the request. 

The matter of prospecting for 
oil around Shawnee, Oklahoma, 
promises to be taken up in earnest, 
says the Quill, for, besides the local 
company which is putting itself in 
shape for operations, two new 
foreign companies, one fiom Kan- 
sas and another from Beaumont, 
Texas, are preparing to invade the 
field. 



KERR'S REPORTS 

(Inc.) 

MONTHLY OIL INVESTMENT 

TABLES 

Give prices, capitalization, assets, character ot 
charter, integrity of management and methods, 
well progress, production and location of oil 
corporations, etc.; official maps. 

We have oil field investigators, ab= 
stract searchers and credit examin- 
ers, the only systematized oil rating agency in 
the world. Authentic Special Reports on 
any oil company, $2.00 upward. 

We have a list of 3000 oil companies; 500 
fraudulent; 800 honest but hopelessly involved 
or incompetent. Do you own stock in 
any of them? 

Subscribe for KERR'S REPORTS 

MONTHLY and keep posted . . . 

One Dollar per year 

Address KERR'S REPORTS, Mills Building, 

San Francisco, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Hndoreed By the California Petroleum 
Miners' Association. 



W B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 
Office and Editorial Rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



Telephone, Bush, 176 

TERMS 

One Year $ 2 50 

Six Months * 5<> 

Three Months z 00 

single Copies IOC 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 



Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Re- 
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3i-3>33- Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name ana address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 



Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal 
as second-class matter. 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 20, 190 1 

"Oil, Copper and Finance," a Los 
Angeles paper 
Market says: " It is ap- 

Possibilities parent to any- 
body possessing 
even a superficial acquaintance J w< ^ h . le ® s ; 
with San Francisco's industrial 
character that the present con- 
sumption of fuel oil in that city is 
hardly more than suggestive of 
the market possibilities. With the 
right kind of effort, the present 
number of consumers can be 
multiplied several times and the 
present consumption of oil at least 
trebled. 

"Substantially all of the concerns 
of the northern metropolis now 
using oil for fuel have resorted to 
it of their own volition, moved by 
the simple power of example; 
silently oil has plead its own case, 
and with the vigilant, enterprising 
and intelligent of fuel consumers 
has plead effectively. 

"Isn't it about time the oil pro- 
ducers got into harness and with 
an energetically, intelligently , sys- 
tematically conducted campaign— 
a 'man on the road' hustle — helped 
oil in its plea for the place it is 
entitled to in the fuel market? 

"What need is there of dream- 
ing of an overproduction of oil, or 
of wrangling over schemes for 
artificially sustaining the price of 
the product, when only a small 
portion ol the available market in 
California has been captured and 
even some of that is being lost 
through failure to promptly com- 
ply with its requirements? 

'Why not do first things first? 
Develop and supply your natural 
market, and then — maybe — turn to 
the divertisement of devising 
'combines,' 'pools' and the other 
frail makeshifts that are popular 
with the people who are so intensly 
'practical' that they prefer toying 
with expedients to the adoption of 
any course that rests on a funda- 
mental principle." 

Why not go a step or two fur- 



ther and say that the oil business, 
so far as San Francisco is con- 
cerned, if not the whole state, is 
in the hands of the Standard Oil 
company. 

No company but the Standard 
seems to be able to guarantee a 
regular supply of oil in any con- 
siderable quantity, and no com- 
pany except the Standard seems 
to be making a systematic effort to 
educate fuel consumers as to the 
relative superiority of oil over 
coal as a fuel. 

The railroads will not or cannot 
supply tank cars. 

The Standard has them, and owns 
enough stock to compel the rail- 
road to haul its oil cars when and 
where it desires. 

No other company but the 
Standard seems to be making any 
effort to persuade manufacturers 
to use oil instead of coal. 

Yet in spite of all this the con- 
sumption of oil is increasing very 
rapidly. No oil-consumer has com- 
plained except when he could not 
get oil enough, or, in one or two 
cases, when consumers have 
bought 15-cent oil which was full 
of dirt, or had been exposed to 
sun and wind until it was almost 



Oil is driving coal out of business. 
No man who has exchanged coal 
for oil will go back to coal if he 
can get a plentiful supply of the 
new fuel. 

All the oil industry needs is to 
have the merits of oil properly 
set forth. 

This is not being done as it 
should be. 

There is need of a campaign of 
education. No organization in the 
state could be of such value to the 
oil business in this regard as the 
California Petroleum Miners' Asso- 
ciation. 

The men in the directorate are 
influential. They represent vari- 
ous oil districts. If the Associa- 
tion was supported as it ought to 
be supported by all the producing 
oil companies, it could engage in a 
campaign of education that would 
accomplish great results. 

The Standard is doing all it can. 
It sends its agents to all points 
telling the story of the possibilities 
of fuel oil. But these agents have 
to contend with the wide-spread 
and well-grounded prej udice which 
exists against the Standard Oil 
company. 

If the California Petroleum 
Miners' Association had the means 
it could be of vast service to the 
oil industry, and could largely in- 
crease the consumption of fuel oil. 



We have all kinds of experts who 
claim to be able 
The Cheapest to locate the 
Expert Yet defines of the 
various oil belts. 
There is the scientific geologist 
who has made a study of the sub- 
ject for years, but who does not 
claim infallibility. They can be 



counted on the fingers of one 
hand. 

There is the expert who has 
picked up a few smatterings of 
scientific phrases, and who clips 
here and there from the reports of 
others, and who manages to get 
up any kind of report promoters 
want in orderto sell stocks. These 
are numerous, and some receive 
quite good pay for a satisfactory 
exercise of their gall and ignorance. 

Then there is the oil witch man 
who holds in his hand the stick 
which will invariably point to the 
place where oil can be found. 
These are getting scarce. 

Scarcer still is the oil smeller 
whose olfactory powers will tell 
where the oil lies. He sniffs and 
walks, walks and sniffs, and stops 
when he smells oil. 

But now comes the "electro 
magno" men, who have an instru- 
ment "operated by the combined 
action of electricity and chemicals. 
Oil belts can be located to a cer- 
tainity by passing the electro 
magno over the surface of the 
ground. It will prove absolutely 
successful in locating producing 
wells." 

They claim "We find that large 
oil belts exist within the limits of 
San Francisco, Alameda, Oakland 
and Berkeley, as well as in many 
other places in the different bay 
counties near San Francitco. 

"Where there is oil under the. 
surface of any land, we can define 
the exact lines of the belt. We 
make no mistakes." 

If there is any bun in the bakery 
of the oil industry these gtntlemen 
deserve it. 

The scientist, the fake, the ex- 
pert, the oil witch, and the 
smeller — none of these are in it 
with the electro magno men. 



COMPLBTED. 



Should Divide 
Profits 



The Sistersville, West Virginia, Oil 
Review says: 
" The use of 
oil as fuel is 
becoming more 
extensive every day; no new 
fields are being discovered, the 
demand for every purpose con- 
tinued, the shipments exceed the 
runs, and yet the markets of the 
world will not justly advance 
which every sane man knows 
should come and right away." 

The Review ought to go a little 
further and state that considering 
the profits in the oil business, and 
considering the increasing demand 
for oil that it is about time the 
Standard Oil company expressed a 
willingness to whack up with the 
producers. 



Will Own Cars. 

The Texas oil men cannot ob- 
tain cars from the railroad and are 
consequently obliged to furnish 
them themselves. The latest news 
is that a company has been formed 
with a capital of $3,000,000; as 
a distributing company and has 
placed an initial order for 100 cars 
at $900 each. 

California prcducers can follow 
suit. 



Refining Works of the Standard 
Rock Oil Finished. 

The Standard Rock Oil com- 
pany has erected its refining plant 
and is now taking out asphaltum 
from its immense tar beds in Santa 
Clara county. Already inquiries 
have come in from the continent 
and even the Hawaiian Islands 
for samples and prices. Contracts 
heretofore mentioned will give 
the company a handsome net re- 
turn. This industry, as one of the 
big asphaltum men in town said, is 
as yet only in its infancy and the 
possibilities are as great as those 
of the famous steel and iron trade. 
The Standard Rock Oil com- 
pany's stock can be commended 
as an investment, and no better 
Christmas present can be given 
than a good block of this com- 
pany's stock." It has a commend- 
able feature in that it is increasing 
in value every month, and as the 
output of crude and refined pe- 
troleum increases from month to 
month the price of the stock will 
increase correspondingly. The 
element of risk has been eliminated 
from the value of this stock, and 
no company stands higher with 
the investing public than the 
Standard Rock Oil. 

One fact should be particularly 
borne in mind and that is the ex- 
tremely small capitalization of 
only 300,000 shares at jSi par 
value, half of which was placed 
in the treasury. 1 he very con- 
servative and yet vigorous man- 
agement of the president of the 
company has brought it to the 
front and his honest endeavors 
have finally succeeded. For a 
long time the president has diked 
his own money and given his en- 
tire time to the enterprise without 
any recompense whatever. Fol- 
lowing his example the officers of 
the company have never drawn 
any salary and will not receive 
any until the first dividends are 
declared which according to the 
present outlook may take place 
inside of three to four months. 
The above points are worth men- 
tioning as nearly all oil companies 
pay salaries to some of their 
officers. 

The Standard Rock Oil com- 
pany's stockholders invested their 
money in good faith and in return 
were assured that their lisk was 
extremely small. The company 
is today actually free from debt, 
ready to sell its refined asphaltum 
at a figure which cannot be dupli- 
cated by companies less favorably 
situated, as the Standard Rock's 
deposits and works are located 
only ninety miles from San Fran- 
cisco. 

The stockholders in the com- 
pany are to be congratulated on 
account of the prosperous condi- 
tion of the company's affairs, and 
more particularly on account of 
the promise of a bright and pros- 
perous future. 



PACIFIC OIL RKPORTKR 



OILING THE ROADS. 



King* County to Improve the 
Highway* Near Hanford. 

Supervisor Geo. Tomer is arrang 
ing for a shipment of heavy crude 
oil from the Kern county field, 
the same to be used in the sprink- 
ling of county roads in bis distiict. 
He found that he would get a car- 
load as soon as the transportation 
company could secure a car to 
ship it in. 

Mr. Tomer has already bad the 
old county sprinkling wagon re- 
built so that it can be used for the 
application of the crude oil to the 
roads. He has cut off the water 
sprinkling attachment and had 
four-inch iron pipes attached by 
a "T" connection and a valve, and 
the cross pipe, which is to serve 
as the sprinkler is seven feet long, 
and perforated on the under side 
with 152 quarter-inch holes. The 
tank on the wagon will bold 1200 
gallons of oil, and when it is filled 
from the car it will be taken to the 
steam boilers at the Guernee mill 
and warmed up with steam, then 
taken to the road where the oil is 
to be applied. 

Mr. Tomer intends to apply the 
oil treatment, to begin with, on 
two miles of road running south 
from the Hanford cemetery, also 
on one mile running east fromtbe 
corner of the county road and 
Seventh street, and from the same 
corner two miles north. It will 
take five carloads of cil to apply 
two coats to the five miles of road 
named. The sprinkling will be 
done from the wagon above de- 
scribed, and the sprinkled surface 
will be fourteen feet in width, the 
first application will be given the 



second time over. The road has 
been graded and placed in readi- 
ness to receive the application, 
with the exception of running a 
harrow over It just before the oil 
is applied, and then the barrow 
will be applied again in order to 
mix the oil with the dirt. 

This will be the first experiment 
with oiled roads in this county, 
and will be watched with much 
interest. The oil will cost 25 
cents per barrel of forty-two gal- 
lons at the Kern county point of 
shipping, and the freight will 
bring the cost delivered here up 
to 38 cents per barrel. A car will 
contain 150 barrels, and it will take 
five carloads to complete the ex- 
periment. 

Past experience in other locali- 
ties has thoroughly demonstrated 
that the ciling process is safe and 
serviceable, and the Sentinel be- 
lieves that Supervisor Tomer has 
taken the proper step to commence 
the building of permanent good 
roads in his district. — Hanford 
Sentinel. 



TERRIBLY BURNED. 



A West Virginia Accident That 
Should Warn Californians. 

At the Southern Oil company's 
well on the C. B. Stutler farm, on 
Greenbrier, about three miles 
south of Salem, a terrible accident 
occurred Thursday morning about 
10 o'clock, as a result of which 
four men were badly burned, some 
of whom narrowly escaped with 
their lives. 

Daniel Shorts, the driller; Peter 
Hoey, tool dresser; Charlie Smith 
a boiler maker, and Robert Davis 
of this place, were at work repair- 



ing the boiler. Hoey was inside 
the boiler and was under the im- 
pression that the gas had been 
shut off from the line, but it had 
not been, and in moving the con- 
nection to the boiler it broke off 
at the line and the full pri 
from tbe two-inch line burst forth. 
A big gas torch was burning about 
forty feet away, ami the gas >'" 
mediately ignited, enveloping the 
men in flames. Hoey jumped out 
of the boiler right into the llamcs, 
but ran through them as quickly 
»s possible, tearing his burning 
clcthes off as he ran to Mr. Stut- 
ler s house. 

Mr. Stutler hurried into town 
and was back in an hour with Dr. 
Walter Strother, who gave the 
men medical attention. All were 
badly buined, but Hoey received 
the worst injuries. He was seri- 
ously burned about the head, his 
eyebrows and most of the hair on 
his head being burned off. Mr. 
Stutler brought Hoey to Salem 
and sent him to Parkersburg. 

Davis who was badly burned 
ou the face and hands, came to 
his home at this place and will 
probably not suffer any serious re- 
sults. 

Shorts is still staying at Mr. 
Stutler's and will be able to be at 
work again in a few days. 

Smith, the boiler maker, was 
not seriously burned. — Salem Ex- 
press. 

STILL ANOTHER. 



Rumors Concerning More Los An- 
geles Refineries. 

The Herald says that an oil re- 
finery will be erected in the south- 
western extension of the Los An- 



tield now seems almost 
tared, the open question being 
just who will come to the aid of 
the producers of that section and 
supply the plant. 

The Clatk Shenn.ni Riuge in- 
terests ate still considering the 
matter, and a corporation organ- 
ised with Salt Lake capital will 
hold a meeting this week to take 
action on the proposition of build- 
ing a new refinery to take care 
of the output from that com- 
pany's wells. 

Still another scheme is in the 
air. Mr. Harding, who purchased 
tbe holdings of the Rodeo Oil 
company last summer, is guarding 
it. He is now in the East, *nd it 
is understood is organizing a com- 
pany to develop the property and 
erect a plant to refine the output. 
He proposes to build a plant large 
enough to take care of all the oil 
produced in that field and in the 
northwestern arm. 



Hope It Is True. 

The world is paying good prices 
for manufactured oils, and would 
pay still more, but the whole busi- 
ness is run in the interest of $48,- 
000,000 dividends per year, which 
would be changed if one seller 
was met by one buyer. However, 
$2 oil will come within six months. 
— Sistersville Review. 



Production Decreasing. 

The reduction in the production 
of Pennsylvania oil as shown by 
the runs for the month of Novem- 
ber is a source of gratification to 
many producers, as the situation 
will verwsoon compel the Standard 
Trust to very materially advance 
prices, which should have been 
done long ago. 



Conservatism vs. Wild=Catism 

Each separate oil proposition placed upon the market since oil has become a paramount financial study 
has been a "sure paying and well grounded proposition." Figures are forthcoming in abundance, 
but in this particular figures sometimes lie 

The Bankers and Brokers Oil Co. 



is not a mushroom proposition, but seeks to interest well intentioned investors in the following 
statement, which voices its entire intentions: 



Sec. 23. T. 32 S.. R. 23 E.. M. D. M. 



x« 


4 • 


3 


2 


1 


6 


6 


'•• > 

8 




• 10 • 

• 


11 


12 


7 


8 


17 


• 

16 

• 


• 


• 
14 

• • 


13 


18 


17 


20 


21 


• 2 2* N 
• • 


*C 23 
• \ • 


24 


19 


20 


29 


28 


• 
27 


• \ 

26 > 

• 


•XT 


30 


29 


32 


33 


34 


35 


36 \ 

• 


• 

31 * 


* 32 

• 


5 


4 


3 


2 


1 


•X 


tf 



All wells sunk in the center of the Oil Belt have proven to be large flowing wells. Our prop 
erty is in the center of the oil belt, with producers on all sides. Our well is down over 980 feet. 
We are drilling night and day, and will have a gusher in a few days. Well No. 2 will be started 
when No 1 is finished. Property owned by this Company is marked in black square. Well in 
white. Our Company owns 1000 acres in ban Benito, and holds lease on 80 acres in Kern River, 
and on 4oacres in Sunset-Midway Districts. Treasury Stcck 15 cents per share solely for 
development purposes until the Gusher is brought in, then stock will advance. 



Sec 
4, 
9 

TO 

10 

14 
II 
15 
15 
16 

22 
22 
22 
23 

23 
23 
2 3 
2 5 

2 6 
2 6 
27 

t- 



items 
5 8, 9, 10, Midway Oil Co. 

Inter Nos 

Oriental 
•14 Way 

Selvina 

Buena Vista 
■22 Bay City 

Cassa 

Badger 

Mountain Boy 

Burks 
23 Producers 

BANKERS and BROKERS 

Jolly Joker Oil Co. 

B. &M. 

Boust 

Bakersfield 

Gypsy Queen ' ' 

Mt. Diablo 

San Francisco " 

Basin City " 

Majestic 



KEY TO MAP. 

Sections 
Flowing 32 Geyser Oil Co. 
Producing 32 Stratton Oil Co. 

34 California Fortune Oil Co. 
Drilling 35 Jewett & Blodgett 



Drilling 
Flowing 



Flowing 

Producing 
Flowing 
Drilling 
Flowing 
Drilling 
In Oil 

Drilling 

In Oil 



Drilling 



Sunset-Midway District Oil takes the lead 
and commands the highest market price for 
refining and fuel purposes. 

Refineries are only a few miles distant, and 
Sunset Railroad will be extended within a few 
hundred feet of our wells, giving us a market 
right at our property for our oil, which will net 
the Company a handsome profit. 



Bankers and Brokers Oil Company 

J. W. HEISNBR & CO. 

Financial Agents 

612 PARROTT BIDG., SAN FRANCISCO, CAT,. 



PACIFIC Olt REPORTER 



STANDARD JOINTS. 



An Attempt Will Be Made to Have 
a Uniform Standard. 

A meeting of oil well supply 
manufacturers was held in Pitts- 
burg, Pa., Saturday, November 
30th, for the purpose of establish- 
ing a universal or standard joint for 
drilling tools used in the oil coun- 
try. There were present at the 
meeting representatives from such 
well-known Eastern manufacturers 
as Bovaird & Seyfang Manufac- 
turing Co.; Frank Hamilton, of 
Bradford, Pa.; Star Drilling Co., 
of Akron, O.; W. H. Larkin, of 
Butler, Pa ; and Morris St. Clair 
of Luma, O. 

The need of a standard joint 
has long been felt. It has been 
especially so in California since 
the opening of the Coist fields. 
When the boom was on it was 
impossible to get drilling tools out 
here fast enough. The result was 
that tools were ordered from all 
the manufacturers of the East ir- 
repective of joints, and in a little 
while there was the deuce to pay. 
Many of the men then drilling in 
California had not had wide ex- 
perience with joints, and in their 
eagerness to begin development 
work they bought tools wherever 
they could get them — some of one 
joint from one dealer and some of 
another joint from another- dealer. 
These they tried to put together 
and work. We all know the re- 
sult; it forms part of the history 
of the boom. There was all kinds 
of trouble, and fishing jobs were 
as numerous as fleas on a stray 
cur. Then, too, the California 
manufacturers were making joints 
which would not fit the Eastern 
joints most generally in use, and 
would not fit each other's joints. 
For two or three years more 
money was spent in fishing jobs 
than in actual drilling and this 
feature alone cost the industry in 
California a mint of money. 

During the past year the diffi- 
culty has been solving itself some- 
what. Eastern machinests ac- 
quainted with this peculiar branch 
of mechanics have been employed 
in the various shops and the use 
of the O. W. S. joint quite gen- 
erally adopted. 

However, every oil man and 
mechanic knows and realizes the 
vast importance and necessity of 
the adoption of a standard joint 
for all oil well tools the world 



over and all will join in wishing 
that such an agreement may be 
universally reached. At the Pitts- 
burg meeting it was agreed that 
joint drawings made to comply as 
closely as possible with the Ire- 
land & Hughes flat thread joiDt 
be submitted and plates be made 
by some manufacturer not identi- 
fied with the manufacture of tools 
for drilling. The committee in 
whose hands the matter was 
placed was instructed to make a 
future report, after calling upon 
all oil well supply manufacturers 
to ratify the standard joint. 

Oil men generally in this state 
will be gratified to see such manu- 
facturers as Llewellyn Bros , 
Baker Iron Works and Los An- 
geles Well Tool Works of Los An- 
geles; Union Iron Works of Santa 
Paula; Webster Iron Works and 
Bakersfield Iron Works of Bakers- 
field join in this agreement if it 
is carried out. 



Inroads of Fuel Oil. 

J. W. Harrison in his weekly 
report of the coal trade says: 

"A few cargoes of good domestic 
fuel would find ready sale at a 
profit, but steam coal is offered by 
importers at less than cost without 
finding buyers. This is attributa- 
ble to the inroads of fuel oil into 
the market as a steam producer, as 
it proves to be more easily handled, 
delivered as needed, and costs 
much less than coal. The annual 
imports of coal this year will com- 
pare favorably with last, its con- 
sumption will not fall off more 
than about ten per cent, notwith- 
standing there will be displaced 
fully one million of tons of coal by 
other fuel. 



Eastern Oil Development. 

During November, 1.307 wells 
were completed in the Penrsyl- 
vania and Trenton oil fields, the 
dry holes numbering 276 and the 
new production amounted to 16,- 
512 barrels. More wells were 
completed than during any other 
month of the present year. Com- 
pared with October there is an in- 
crease of eighty-one wells com- 
pleted and thirty-eight dry holes, 
accompanied by a decrease of 
seventy-eight barrels in the new 
production. The figures on new 
production have improved very 
nearly constant, having ranged in 
the neighborhood of 16,000 bar- 
rels for the past seven months. 
The new work in progress at the 
close of November was composed 
of 579 rigs and 1,124 drilling wells. 
This was a decrease of forty-five 
rigs and a gain of twenty-nine 
drilling wells, making a net loss 
of sixteen in new operations as 
compared with the figures for the 
last of October. 



Now "Up To" Santa Fe. 

W. G. Nevin, general manager 
of the Santa Fe lines, has been 
served with a copy of the new oil- 
hauling rates ordered by the State 
Board of Railway Commissions. 
The subject has been referred to 
general headquarters in Chicago, 
which will determine whether or 
not the new rates are to be made 
effective without an appeal to the 
courts. 

A Florence correspondent, writ- 
ing to a Denver paper, says: 
Twelve companies are now actively 
at work in the oil fields of Fre- 
mont county, and it is safe to say 
that the year 1902 will witness a 
greater oil production here than 
any two previous years. 



Oil on Railroads. 

The Southern Pacific R. R. has 
about 150 locomotives using oil for 
fuel and the service is being ex- 
tended as rapidly as possible. The 
company is using about 75,000 
barrels of oil per month. The 
Atchison has one oil engine in use 
at Dallas but proposes to increase 
the number materially as scon as 
oil tanks have been located at con- 
venient points along the road. 
The Kansas City Southern has 
equipped two engines for oil and 
results are declared to be very 
satisfactory. The Texas Railroad 
Commission has established a low 
rate on fuel compound with the 
idea of increasing the use of this 
product. The compound consists 
of a mixture of oil with sawdust, 
which is then handled in the same 
manner as coal. Slack coal is also 
being mixed with oil and used 
with good results. 

Big Oil Shipment. 

On Tuesday of last week the 
Standard Oil Company shipped out 
twenty-eight cars of oil from the 
Kern Kiver district. Most of the 
cars came to San Francisco, and 
the oil was immediately sent to the 
big consumers, who have been put 
to serious inconvenience from 
lack of fuel oil, the lack of oil be- 
ing due to the inability of the 
railroads to furnish tank cars. 

The Standard has its own cars 



and the railroads haul them with- 
out demur. 

The Standard hcs lately come to 
the rescue of several large oil con- 
sumers, who would have been 
obliged to shut down their works 
from lack of fuel. 



Oil in Alaska. 

Steamers from southern Alaska 
bring news of important petroleum 
discoveries in the Cook Inlet re- 
gion. Oil is found floating from 
numerous springs and in one 
place there a lake covering thirty 
acres filled with oil from springs. 
Most of the oil is around Inner- 
skiu bay and Coal Oil bay. One 
drilling plant is now in operation, 
having reached a depth of several 
hundred feet. During the sum- 
mer over 50,000 acres were set 
aside as oil lands. Many locations 
were made for a Philadelphia 
syndicate. Several drilling plants 
will be sent north next spring. 
The Standard Oil company is said 
to have experts on the ground in- 
vestigating. 



Russian vs. American Oil. 

Following the policy of Herr 
Thielen, the Prussian Minister of 
Public Works, of giving prefer- 
ence to Russian petroleum, as 
against American petroleum, the 
government of the Cassel district 
has ordered that the use of Ameri- 
can oil be discontinued every- 
where on the line, except for office 
and signal lights. American oil is 
retained for use in these lights 
because it does not smoke the 
lamps. 



Texas Tank Steamers. 

The recently organized Beau- 
mont Oil Transportation company 
announces the purchase of five 
tank steamers, each of 30,000 bar- 
rels' capacity. The company will 
have these vessels in commission 
carrying oil from Sabine Pass to 
New York by the latter part of 
January. Dockage is said to have 
been secured on the New Jersey 
side of the Hudson river. 



The greatest number of oil wells- 
brought in during an3 one month 
in the Beaumont fields was in 
October. It seems that October 
will hold the record, for since that 
time there has been and will be 
considerable wildcatting in sur- 
rounding territory, more than bor- 
ing for gushers on the Hill. 



Fishing Tools 



Fishing Tools 



A full line of fiihing tools constantly on hand for rent. Casing spears, casinf cutters, swedges, combination slip sockets, slip 
sockets, horn sockets, bull dog sockets, under-reamers, rope spears, rope grab, rope sockets, spuds, boot-jacks, fishing jars, subs, 
spiders or ring and wedge, tool wrenches, tool hooks, jar-knockers, elevators, and anything else pertaining to the oil business. 

Bishop Fishing Tool Company 

91 Fremont Street, San Francisco. 

Branches at McKitjrick and Sunset. 



50c Asphaltum Refinery 50c 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure 

Gilt=Edged Stock 



> 



Inside of two months this valuable. 

We leased land in McKittnck. half a mile from the 
static o, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As sch.ii as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have just secured 

6000 ACRES 6000 ACRES 

of land that produces untold quantities of asphalt 
near Sargents Station. 



stick will cost you One Dollar. 

We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
asphalt at a figure which will enable us to pay divi- 
dends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract carload lots for crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

Ali the houses are erected ard Refining Works 
NOW COMPLETED. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned inside of 90 
days. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $20 per ton 
is better than the Trinidad at $35. 



STANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY 

Capitalization Only 300,000 Shares at $1 par Value. 

475-476 Parrott Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 



Choice Oil Land for Sale 

We have been authorized to sell three pieces of land in Section 13, Township 29, Range 28, in that portion of the 

Kern River Oil district known as 

SOUTH OF KERN RIVER 

It is all patented land and the title is guaranteed. 

The Chicago Extension is now drilling on the land adjoining, with every prospect of striking oil. 

The Wizard Oil Company is drilling southwest of us. 

The Panorama had 150 feet of oil sand on Section 14, adjoining us, but lost the well. 

The land is only a mile south of Discovery well, where oil was first struck in the Kern River District. 

There is no doubt but that with a proper rig for drilling in the soft formations oil will be struck here at about 1500 feet. 

We will sell this land in a body, or will split it up into three pieces. 

We are able to offer it for a short time only at 

$60 PER ACRE 

This is over 50 per cent lower than any land is offered in this portion of the district. 



EASY TERMS 



EASY TERMS 



For maps and further information apply to 

THE PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 






K vywwwwvwwwwwwwwww^^^^^^^^v»»^^^^^^»^^^****************^***^/wv>*^***/w>***********' 



THE PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments 
of the 



In Oil In Various Parts 
State. 



COLDSA. 
Another tower has been put on the 
Smith & Gorrill well The work is pro- 
gressing nicely. 

KERN. 

The Junction on 9, 29-2S is building a 
new rig and will shortly be at work on 
No. 5. 

It is now announced that the Sunset 
road will be opened for traffic on the 
22nd of this month. 

The Bankers and Brokers well on 23, 
32-23 is down a little over 1000 feet, the 
drill now being in blue clay. 

The Shasta on 28-27, will start the 
drill again shortly after the first of the 
year and sink its well to a greater depth. 

The Mercedes company, operating on 
section 5, 29-28, just to the south of the 
Monte Cristo propert3', has decided to 
begin at once in developing its holdings 
very extensively. 

The Union has a Urge force prepar- 
ing the grounds for its big refining 
plant in the Kern River field. The 
plans provide for a very extensive plant 
and several months will elapse before 
the big enterprise is completed. 

The Obispo has resumed drilling on 
its well in section 2, 11-24. The com- 
pany is a lessee of the Monarch and the 
fact that it is located on their ground is 
a very good guarantee of its success. 
The drill is now down over 300 feet on 
No. 1. 

The iMcKittrick company's 2000-foot 
well now promises to be a fair producer. 
The casing was plugged at 900 feet and 
was perforated on Sunday. The -oil at 
once rose seventy feet in the pipe and 
it is estimated now that the well will go 
fifty barrels. 

The Sanborn Oil Company, now ope- 
rating in the Devil's Den district, has 
purchased all of the drilling outfit, pipe 
lines and other personal property of the 
Gibbs Oil Company in the Kettleman 
hills and will remove the material to their 
lands in the Devil's Den, where they 
will begin work next month. 

The New Jupiter Light Oil company, 
in which quite a number of our local 
people are interested, will send a force of 
about a dozen men to the Devil's Den 
district this week to finish up the 
assessment work on their oil lands. A 
part of the work was done some time 
ago. — Lemoore Leader. 

The Standard continues to rush work 
on its tanks in the river field and judged 
from the material on the grounds it will 
be several months before the last of the 
present installment of tanks is com- 
pleted. Twenty-four of the big 35,000 
barrel tanks are said to be filled to the 
brim with oil, six are ready for filling 
and a dozen or more are in various stages 
of construction. 

KINGS. 
The Acme Oil company received a 
carload of extra heavy n 5-8 drive casing 
last week which it is putting down. It 
is drilling for oil about twelve miles due 
south of Huron in the Kettleman district. 

The scarcity of oil cars, which is 
scarcer than ever before, is greatly re- 
tarding the marketing of the oil product 
of the Coalinga fields, and the oil men 
are talking of building a pipe line from 
Coalinga to Hani'ord and shipping the 
oil from there over the Santa Fe line. 



LOS ANGELES. 

The Whittier Oil and Development 
Company is down nearly 1300 feet with 
its well on section 24. 

No. 1 of the Whittier Crude Oil Com- 
pany continues to make its daily output 
of nearly 100 barrels. 

Repairs on a boiler have caused a sus- 
pension for a few days on the Warner 
Oil Company's No. 6, which is down to a 
depth of 850 feet. 

The Whittier-Fillmore Company has 
its ivell on the Tubbs-Evans tract down 
nearly 1200 feet with 9^ casing. The 
dnllers have had some hard shells to go 
through, but have made good progress, 

The Home Oil Company is experienc- 
ing some trouble with No. 10, which was 
recently put on the pump after having 
been deepened several hundred feet, and 
as yet it has been impossible to deter- 
mine how much the well has been im- 
proved. On No. 13 nearly 1000 feet of 
hole has been made and the drill is 
down nearly 300 feet on No. 14. 

The leading topic of conversation 
among the Whittier oil men these days 
is the recent strike of the New England 
Oil Company on section 30. The well, 
No. 2, has not yet been put on the pump, 
but is being bailed to free the hole from 
sand. The oil is of light gravity and 
although it has not yet been tested is 
pronounced by some who have seen sam- 
ples to be the lightest yet produced in 
the Whittier field. 

SAN BENITO. 
The Ashurst Oil Company has finished 
the fishing job. 

The Calistoga Oil Company expects to 
strike oil soon. 

The Fresno-San Benito has purchased 
a standard rig. 

The Fresno- Alpha is bringing traces 
of oil right along. 

The Silver Creek Oil Company is go- 
ing ahead with the finest expectations. 

The Union Oil Company still keeps up 
assessment work on over 3000 acres and 
is keeping all agreements with those 
from whom it has leased land. 

SANTA BARBARA. 

A very good flow of seepage oil has 
been encountered in well No. 4 of the 
Western Union company in the Santa 
Maria field and work will be pushed in 
the conviction that the main body of 
sand will be struck at 1500 feet. All the 
wells brought in thus far have been 
drilled considerably deeper, but the 
last is 200 yards from the producers and 
the result is looked for with more than 
ordinary interest. 

STANISLAUS. 
The Yellow Jacket Oil company have 
part of their machinery on the ground 
and expect to begin drilling shortly. 

YOLO. 
The Woodland Mail says the Capay 
Oil company and the Clara L of Sacra- 
mento have entered into an agreement 
whereby the latter company agrees to 
begin sinking an oil well on the land of 
the first named in the western part of the 
county, in the near future, or as soon as 
the weather permits. Several wealthy 
Sacramentans are back of the proposition 
and they mean to keep on boring until 
they determine whether there is oil there 
or not. 



FIRE AT SUMMERLAND. 



Refining Plant of the Santa Bar- 
bara Asphalt Co. Burned. 

The refining plant of the Santa 
Barbara Liquid Asphalt company, 
situated in Summerland, now lies 
in ashes as the result of a con- 
flagration which occurred last 
Monday. 

For a short time the whole town 
of Summerland was threatened to 
be swept off of the face of the 
earth. Owing to the absence of 
wind, the flames were confined to 
the one building, though several 
neighboring buildings were ig- 
nited from sparks. These were 
quickly put out. The origin of 
the fire is unknown. 

Engineer George W. Stevens, 
who was in charge, had just com- 
pleted his round of the various 
kettles, testing the temperatures. 
These he found to be below the 
mark required. He went into the 
front part of the building to record 
the temperatures, when one of 
the tanks or kettles exploded, and 
a second later the building was a 
mass of flames. 

The plant had only just been 
rebuilt, after a disastrous fire some 
months ago, and as nothing was 
saved except a few barrels the loss 
will reach in the neighborhood of 

$10,000. 

It is doubtful if it will be re- 
built again, on account of the dan- 
ger from fire. 

Recently all policies on build- 
ings close to the plant had been 
revoked. 

Oil at the Islands. 

That Hawaii is looking to California 
for a fuel supply is evidenced by the 
following interview with a Mr. Lewis, 
the owner of extensive railway interests 
on Ihe island. Mr. Lewis is now in 
California and relative to the object of 
his visit to this state has the following to 
say: 

Before we return to the islands we will 
have decided this fuel question. It is 
only a matter of finding the best burner 
to employ in the locomotives. We ex- 
pect that oil will prove a great saving, as 
coal is even more expensive in the is- 
lands than here. We are not only going 
to make this change, but will arrange 
to distribute oil to other consumers, such 
as the great plantations, that employ 
heavy power for pumping water. Our 
railroad on the island of Oabu is seventy 
miles long and passes through seven or 
eight of the largest plantations on the 
island. There is also the large factory 
in Honolulu in which is manufactured 
all of the sugar plantation machinery. 
I understand that the management of 
the factory will not wait for us to begin 
the use of oil but is preparing tu put in 
that fuel at once. 

I could not give an estimate of the 
amount of oil that will probably be con- 
sumed in the islands, but it certainly 
will be enough to aid the market of 
California oil. 



Oil in Mexico 

B. L. Doheny, president of the Mexi- 
can Petroleum company operating near 
Tampico, Mexico, in a recent interview 
at the City of Mexico, said: 

"There is no longer any question about 
the existence of oil in this country, " be 
said. "Our company has spent a fortune 
m locating the well, but it is now only a 
question of a short time befcre there 



will be others. We are working six 
holes, all of which give the best of 
promises. The oil has been fully 
analyzed and shows up to be an excellent 
quality of petroleum. It may be used as 
illuminating oil or fuel. We are already 
arranging for refineries to be established 
on our property. There is no question 
about the innovation which the enter- 
prise will create in the fuel industry of 
Mexico when we are thoroughly in 
operation. The railroads will adopt oil 
as fuel in their engines, and factories 
which are now obliged to pay such 
enormous prices for their fuel may be 
furnished a better fuel at a cheaper rate. 



Will Sink Wells. 

The Calistoga Oil & Develop- 
ment company, advertising in an- 
other column, are prepared to 
take contracts for sinking wells. 
This company has the reputation 
of having put down some of the 
deepest wells in the state in ex : 
tremely quick time. They are 
well equipped for work and have 
had experience in different fields, 
so that they are accustomed to the 
various formations. 



Southern Pacific Tank Cars. 

Through persistent efforts of the rail- 
road commissioners, with headquarters 
at Austin, have reported that they have 
received a letter from H. A. Jones, traffic 
manager of the Southern Pacific lines 
in Texas, stating that his compau}' now 
has 181 oil tank cars in use and that an 
order has been placed with the American 
Car and Foundry Company of St. Louis 
to construct additional cars for the Texas 
and New Orleans railroad. Each tank 
car is to have a capacity of 12,500 gal- 
lons, or double the capacity of those 
now in use. Delivery is to begin Febru- 
ary 1st at the rate of five cars per day. 



The New Road. 

The following is a table of the rates of 
fare from Bakersfield to Sunset and in- 
termediate points: 
Miles. Stations. Fare 

7.7 Wible Orchard 30 

n. 5 Gosford 50 

21.3 Conner 1.00 

25.9 . Millux - 1.25 

28.5 Buena Vista r.35 

41.7 Sunset 2.00 



Prospectuses. 

Oil companies who desire to 
have a neat prospectus printed 
should order it from the Pacific 
Oil Reporter. We have a com- 
plete and entirely new job plant, 
and our assortment of maps and 
half-tone representations of oil 
scenes is the best and largest in 
the state. 



Pacific 
Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Subscription, $2.50 Per Year 



pAUSTOGA Oil, AND DEVELOPMENT CO 

500,000 shares par value $1. 
Operating on 2320 acres located fn Napa, Yolo, 
Fresno, San Benilo, Monterey and Kern counties. 
Officers: L D Hitchcock, president; R B Todd, 
vice-president and manager; B F Edwards, 
secretary; J M Caselman, treasurer; Dr. H G 
Thomas and Dr. E J Boyes. San Francisco 
National Bank, depository. Office, 23 and 24 
Merchants Exchange, San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ADVANTAGES OF OIL. 

What Col M. M. Ofidcn. Field l.v- 
pcrt, So.vk About It 

Colcnel M. M Ogden. who has 
just returned from a prolonged 
trip through the northern oil 
fields, in an interview this week 
aM: 

"The value of petroleum as fuel 
stands in the same relation to coal 
as the difference between the days 
of stage coaching and the era of 
limited lightning express trains 
The world's demand today for coal 
foots up f>-°-"0°.c>co tons per an- 
num; the world's supply of pe- 
troleum today is approximately 
30,000,000 tons. The demand for 
fuel is constantly increasing with 
the increase in population aud the 
rapid enlargement of m ami fact 11 r 
ing processes. The world's coal 
supply is steadily diminishing. 
All eminent fuel experts in the 
world unhesitatingly admit the 
lact that fuel oil, i.e., the liquid 
hydrocarbons, constitute the ideal 
fuel in yielding the highest ther 
mal efficiencies and in the mainte- 
nance of uniform steaming power. 

" The world will have use for 
every barrel of petroleum pro- 
duced, and of the production to- 
day of 30,000,000 tons, fully one- 
half is utilized in the manufacture 
of illuminating and lubricating 
oils. The recent exploitation in 
the great oil fields of California 
and Texas have removed the one 
great obstacle urged by fnel ex- 
perts against the use of the liquid 
hydro-carbons; that is, the lack of 
a sufficient supply. 

" While by no means the pres- 
ent production of oil can be con- 
sidered as more than covering a 
slight per cent of the world's de- 
mand for fuel, yet developments 
have indicated that the western 
Tertiary measures of America, as 
I stated three years ago, can be 
relied on tc largely augment the 
world's supply of liquid fuel to 
take the place of the diminishing 
coal production. 

Within five years oil fuel will 
be the dominating factor in manu- 
facturing processes in America, if 
not the world. The same period 
will see a similar change in the 
fuel energies of our railroads and 
steamships. These are logical 
commercial conclusions, and are 
based upon the same sound prin- 
ciple that impels mankind to cross 
the continent in a Pullman sleeper 
on a limited express train, as 
against the primitive passage 
across the plains in the old prairie 
schooner. 

" Before the use of oil fuel in 
the Southern Pacific shops across 
the bay, it would take ten or fif- 
teen minutes to weld boiler tubes. 
Now they are welded at the rate 
of one per minute. In the old 
days when an engine frame was 
broken, it meant a loss of ten or 
twelve days of a locomotive to the 
motive power department, and to 
repair the break the engine had 
to be taken to the shops and 



ped before the frame could 
be rcpain with oil fuel, 

tbe engine can be set on a siding, 
and without stripping, with the 
use of oil fuel, the frame can be 
welded and the engine returned 
tc service in Ins than twenty-four 
hours. I could fill a volume with 
illu>trations of the same practical 
nature Illustrating the immense 
value of liquid hydro carbon fuel 
I am firmly convinced that the 
day is not far distant when in ship 
building we will substitute weld- 
ing plates instead of using rivets. 
This will mean an immense saving 
of lime in I he construction of 
ships, and will give added ele- 
ments to strength. 

"Then are some features about 
California oils that are worthy of 
consideration. One-hundred bar- 
rels of average Eastern petroleum 
will give the following yield: ;6 
barrels illuminating oil, n barrels 
gasoline, benzine and naphtha, 
3 barrels lubricating oil, to barrels 
residual and waste. 

•'Now I have found in my ex- 
aminations and analyses of Cali- 
fornia oils that our oils yield a 
better grade of gasoline than is 
disti.led from Eastern oils. And 
further that the yield of lubricating 
oils from our California liquid 
hydro-carbons ranges from 10 to 
60 per cent, and that brings -ve to 
the question of our supply of 
lubricating oil, that is, to the 
United States. From the figures 
submitted above, it wiil be seen 
that a very small per cent of east- 
ern petroleum comes from the 
stills in the shape of lubricating 
oil. The other sources of supply 
of lubricating oils in the east are 
the wells at Franklin, Venango 
county, Pennsylvania, whicL pro- 
duce about 60,000 barrels of oil 
per annum which commands a 
price of $4 per barrel at the wells; 
the lubricating oil wells at Volcano 
and Petroleum, W. Va., which pro- 
duce 18,000 barrels per annum 
with a value of $2.30 per barrel at 
the wells; the Mecca, Ohio, lubri- 
cating oil which commands $5 31 
per barrel at the wells, but there 
is only a supply of 1,000 barrels 
per annum. 

It will be seen from the above 
that California oils are certain to 
be a great iactor in the lubricating 
oil production of the world. The 
oil found in seepages in Colusa 
county, by reason of its excessive 
gravity and high boiling point, 
proves that the oil of this district 
will have when this section has 
been developed, the same relative 
values as the oil from the restricted 
lubricating oil districts of Penn- 
sylvania and West Virginia. 

Not alone is this true of Colusa 
cou ty but of many other produc- 
ing points in California. 

In the earlydays.it was claimed 
that our California liquid hydro- 
carbons were refractory and diffi- 
cult of distillation; but these chemi- 
cal disadvantages have practically 
been overcome and in the refinery, 



! about to be erected by the Standard 
Oil company at Point Richmond, 
lour producers can rest assured 
'that all of the values will be ex- 
tracted from our oils. 

Our California oils, too, are rich 
in a singular degree in tbe chemi- 
cal series, pyridin and chinolin 
which give us the synthetic 
alkaloids and analine dyes. We, 
of course, know too that the 
asphalt from these oils has a com- 
mercial value. 

Prim my examinations along 
the coast, I am satisfied that Cali- 
fornia and Oregon will, within a 
few years, stand in the front rank 
in the production of illuminating 
oils of a pa ratline base, so that the 
Pacific Coast will not only present 
to the world the best fuel oil, and 
likewise be one of the main sources 
of supply of the world's lubricat- 
ing oil, but will also be one of our 
main centers of supply of illumi- 
nating oils. 

Had a Gusher. 

The Bakersfield Echo of last 
Friday says: 

For a full half hour the other 
day the York syndicate had a 
gusher. From a stream that bub- 
bled over the casing it grew in 
height till the oil was shooting far 
above the derrick. Showers of 
sand and rock were thrown from 
the well during the time and as 
they hammered away at the crown 
block the oil continued to flood 
the grounds in the vicinity of the 
derrick. The well choked up after 
a half hour of this performance, 
but will probably resume its flow 
when the sand is removed. The 
company is now down 902 feet and 
is working in the fourth sand. 
Superintendent H. I,. Dort has 
planned to sink the well to the 
1 100-foot level and hopes to dis- 
cover still another sand. An un- 
usual depth of sand has already 
been penetrated and indications are 
flattering for a thrifty well. 

This well is located on the land 
adjoining that of the Yankee Girl 
Oil Company, which is now about 
ready to commence drilling. This 
company also has producing wells 
in Los Angeles and has land in the 
proven districts of Sunset, McKit- 
trick and San Benito. 



J. B. Brittain of Pensacola, Fla., 
says: "We are inclined to the be- 
lief that an oil well will be brought 
in in Pensacola in the near future. 
One company has a derrick up 
and the pipe on the ground, ready 
for drilling. The men who are 
interested in this company will 
drill to the depth of 2500 feet if 
necessary to bring in a gusher. 
The property on which they are 
prospecting is situated in the city. 

There is great activity near the 
McKenzie farm, three miles from 
Boulder, Col. The bore of the 
well is being made larger. On 
the Arnold farm, north of the Mc- 
Kenzie place, a derrick is being 
erected, and boring is to begin 
soon. On the Jefferson place, 
south of the McKenzie farm, a 
derrick will also be put up, and 
one will be erected on the Ward 
farm, just east of the McKenzie 
place. 



— 

1 r 

I'ruducep*' Oil Exchange 
The following « 
the Product 

formal sessions held for the week ciunii K 
Weil 1 

A I'l I l 

1000 at 14 

CAR1 

MA STANDARD, 



DORA Da 

'So it jj n i,, 

ion nt 

FOl'K OIL. 

MO nt 19 171 50 

1-'"" it SO 1600 00 

So at 53 

GIANT. 

1000 at 28 2H0 00 

HOHB oil* 

H3 5 «t .1 35 j; „, 75 

22j( B90) hi 3 45 776 25 

-5 (S2)3 35 S3 75 

HANFORD. 

2 at 90 00 180 00 

1 (Bro)at 92 00 . Q2 00 

4 at 91 00 364 00 

INDEPENDENCE. 

500 at 08 40 00 

JUNCTION. 

S°o at 25 125 00 

LION. 

3400 at 07 238 00 

MONARCH OF ARIZONA. 

oo(I!6o) at iS 54 00 

6oo( B6o)at 20 1 20 00 

500 ( S6o)at 19 95 00 

200 (B90) at 21 42 00 

100 at 20 20 00 

200 at 21 42 00 

500 at 15 75 00 

2 100 at 16 336 00 

OIL CITY PETROLF.UM. 

2400 at 20 480 00 

PETROLEUM CENTER. 

3000 (B9o)at 04 12000 

iooo{ B6o)at 04 40 00 

100 at 04 4 00 

PEERLESS. 

20o(B9o)at 5 25 1050 00 

15 at 5 00 75 00 

10 at 5 12^ 51 25 

REED CRUDE. 

1500 at 33 495 00 

500 at 34 170 00 

SENATOR. 

i< o at 65 65 00 

SAN JOAQUIN O. & D. 

5 at 6 25 31 25 

50 at 6 75 337 50 

S. F. & McKITTRICK. 

20 at 1 15. 23 00 

SOVEREIGN. 

560 at 19 106 40 

5oo( B6o)at 20 100 00 

Too ( B90) 20 20 00 

STERLING. 

165 at 1 15 189 75 

100 at 1 12^ 112 50 

WOLVERINE. 
300 at 50 150 co 

Shares 26,657 Amount $11,626 40 



W. A. K1DD 



M. H. MURRAY 



1HURRAMIDD 
DRILLING CO. 

Contract to Drill Oil and Water Wells 

and Build Rigs and Pumping Plants 



Furnish Estimates on Everything 
Used Around Oil Wells 



EXPERIENCED MEN TO 
OPERATE FISHING TOOLS 

^o'b JlT m Hoten Bakersfield, Cal. 

P. O. Box 369, SANTA CRUZ, CAL. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



WILL BURN OIL. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Soon to 
Discard Coal as Fuel. 

Last week one of the largest 
steamship companies of the Paci- 
fic Coast commenced making an in- 
vestigation as to the practicability 
of using oil instead of coal for 
fuel. 

They have a large fleet of deep 
sea steamers, and should they de- 
cide on burning oil, as they un- 
doubtedly will, this company will 
consume no small share of the 
California oil output. 

Their representative obtained 
from the Pacific On, Reporter 
analyses of the oil from the vari- 
ous fields and statistics as to the 
heat unit capacity of the various 
oils. 

It is expected that the change 
in fuels will be made about the 
first of the year. 

The respective merits of fuel oil 
versus coal for use on ocean going 
steamers continues to be agitated, 
and though a number of steamers 
are being converted to oil burners 
— particularly ferry and coast 
steamers — there are many cham- 
pions of coal who refuse to be con- 
vinced that oil has all the ad- 
vantages that are being claimed 
for it. In this regard California 
is very favorably situated, for 
while the arguments for and 
against are being waged along 
technical lines in the East, right 
here on the shores of the Pacific 
at least one steamer has been 
burning oil for fuel for fourteen 
years and affords the strongest 
kind of evidence in favor of oil as 
fuel on the score of cheapness, 
convenience and efficiency. 

According to the Los Angeles 
Herald, the steamer Pasadena, 
owned by the Kerckhoff-Cuzner 
Mill and Lumber company, was 
built in 1887, and was then 
equipped to use oil for fuel. From 
that time to this the little steamer 
has been running between San 
Pedro and Eureka, and has never 
been cut down by the government 
inspectors on steam; the same 
boilers are in use, and with the 
exception of a tube having to be 
renewed occasionally, they are 
now as good as new. "The proof 
of the pudding is in the eating of 
it," according to the old proverb, 
and the experience of Kerckhoff 
& Cuzner with this steamer— the 
pioneer ocean going boat that is 
burning oil for fuel — is of value. 

" At first the matter of obtaining 
a suitable and . wholly efficient 
burner caused us some trouble," 
said James Cuzner, " but we had 
confidence that we were on the 
right track and continued our ex- 
periments. Altogether we ex- 
pended some thousands of dollars 
before we got things just as we 
desired, and from that time on all 
has been plain sailing. With the 
exception of about three months 
the steamer has run continuously. 
When the Julia, a ferry steamer 



running between Vallejo and 
Vail jo Junction, exploded while 
making the passage, the accident, 
in which several passengers lost 
their lives, was ascribed to theoil 
fuel used, Pending a conclusion of 
the investigation the Pasadena 
was debarred from using oil for 
fuel. It was discovered, however, 
that in the case of the Julia the 
oil was in no sense responsible. 
It was supposed that the oil tanks 
had exploded, but when the 
steamer was raised the oil tanks 
were found intact; but there nad 
been a defect in the boiler, and it 
was the boiler that had burst. At 
that time we went to Washington 
and had a measure passed allow- 
ing freight boats to continue to 
use oil for fuel, and as time went 
on the same liberty was accorded 
to passenger boats. 

" We equipped the Pasadena as 
an oil burning steamer in opposi- 
tion to the wishes and against the 
advice of her builders, but we be- 
lieved in oil as fuel and desired 
also to do what we could to en- 
courage a home industry. We 
obtained the oil from Ventura and 
for cleanliness, ease of loading, 
simplicity of feeding and general 
economy we have found that it is 
far ahead of coal." 

In the old days it cost $2.25 a 
barrel for oil at the wells to load 
the Pasadena, as compared with 
from $9 to' $10 per ton for Aus- 
tralian coal, bought by wholesale. 
Upon the Pasadena returning from 
each trip a car of oil would be run 
onto the wharf, and while the 
steamer was being discharged the 
oil would be taken aboard, either 
by gravity or by being pumped. 
By the time the work of discharg- 
ing had been completed stores 
and fuel would all be aboard and 
the steamer be ready to proceed 
at once to sea. Here there was 
an actual money saving in cost of 
time. Stokers and coal heavers 
are done away with and oilers 
take their places. Here again 
there is an economy of labor and 
it is intelligence that is needed in 
regulating the feed of oil, rather 
than the muscular strength of the 
old-time stoker. There is no grit 
to clog the bearings or otherwise 
damage the machinery, nor smoke 
to discolor the paint work. Then, 
too, in case of any accident, such 
as a feed pipe breaking, the fires 
go out just as in shutting off the 
gas and there is no raking out of 
fires or lifting out of ashes. 



Ogden, Utah, is to have an oil 
exchange, and the articles of in- 
corporation will be filed within 
the next few days. For some time 
the project has been under con- 
sideration. The exchange will be 
incorporated for $100,000' in $1 
shares, and rooms in the Eccles 
building have been engaged for 
the use of the members. The in- 
corporators are M. J. F. Beyfert, 
George J. Kelly, J. H. Knauss, J. 
A. Guthrie, M. D. Lessinger and 
others. 



It is stated that crude oil for the 
purposes of fuel will be admitted 
free of duty to the southern re- 
public, provided that plans pro- 
posed by the Mexican government 
can be adjusted. 



M. GROSSMAYER. 

CONTRACTOR EOR 

Drilling Oil Wells 

Box 213, 
Bakersfield, Cal. 

Room 17, 
I9 21 Chester Ave. 




M. Grossmayer's Drilling Outfit. 



Pacific Coast Underwriting Company. 

Incorporate companies; furnish 
everything complete. 

Sell interest-bearing Gold Bonds. 

Underwrite stocks. 

Buy and sell Oil Lands. 

Handle all kinds of mining 
properties. 

Information furnished investors 
regarding Pacific Coast Corpora- 
tions. Address, 

Main Office, 507-8-9 Parrott Bldg., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



AMERICAN, 

STEEL AND WIRE CM'PY 



Pacific Works 

The only Wire Rope Factory on 
the Pacific Coast. 



We make 

Wire Ropes, Cable and Hawsers 

For all purposes and with 
every possible combination 
of Wires, steel and iron, 
galvanized or plain. 



&&? 



Wire Ropes 
Of all Kinds 
For Oil Well 
Purposes 

And all fixtures and appliances 
for the use of Wire Rope 



Send your orders to 

American Steel&Wire Co. 

LOS ANGELES— No. 206 North 

Los Angeles St. 
SAN FRANCISCO— No. 8 & 10 

Pine St. 



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BUY OR SELL 
CALIFORNIA 

OIL STOCKS 



. THROUGH 



JOSEPH B.TOPLITZ 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange, 
Member California Petroleum Miners' Association. 

330 Pine Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Orders for Buying and Selling California Oil Stocks 
Promptly Attended to. 

Reliable information on Oil Stocks Furnished Gratis. 

Unlisted Stocks a specialty. 

Correspondence Solicited. 

Reference — California Safe Deposit & Trust Co., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



For Sale Cheap 
5,(00 (or less) Shares Standard Con. 0. & L. Co. | 

Any Reasonable Offer Will Be Accepted 



1 



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gS t 53T=538=539 PARROTT BUILDING 3? 

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riO .-»• References: San Francisco Banks. ill 



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Authentic information furnished regarding corporations operating in the State of California — 






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nto to I have trustworthy data always available. ;Ii 

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rvX to Correspondence welcomed. >Ii 

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14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Combination Rigs. 

Field Manager Branch and Con- 
tractor Sturm have been doing 
some experimenting with drilling 
machinery that is of a great deal 
of interest to oil men. They are 
drilling on Denver Oil Company 
No. 2, or commonly known as 
Smith tract. It has been almost 
impossible to make any headway 
on account of the emery-like rock 
wearing away tr e drill. Tne pipe 
would be lowered in the morning 
with a fresh tail drill and by night 
apparently went down seven 
inches. When pipe would be 
withdrawn next day six inches 
had been worn off the end of the 
drill. Necessity is said to be the 
mother of invention and they 
have rigged up a cable drill wkh 
a rotary water attachment which 
they believe will solve the pro 
blem. The drilling outfit has 
been fitted up very scientifically 
and the drill pipe is provided with 
a cushion at the same time giving 
the drill a poweiful force by at- 
taching several joints of heavy 
hydraulic casing between the 
drill and the drill pipe proper. 
Water is pumped in the same 
manner as a rotary. 

The National Oil and Pipe Line 
company has completed their large 
loading rack on the Southern Pa- 
cific just below Gladys. They 



have also installed their large 
pumps for loading vessels at Port 
Arthur. Their loading racks on 
the Kansas City Southern were 
completed some time ago and they 
are now one of the best equipped 
companies in the field. — Beau- 
mont Enterprise. 



OIL DIRECTORY 



heading Companies Now Operat- 
ing In California. 



In Oregon. 

J. H. Brown returned afew days 
since from the Malheur oil fields, 
where he went to file on a tract of 
and for some Sumpter people. He 
will go down again soon for the 
same purpose. He has already 
located about two sections or 1280 
acres. He is thoroughly familiar 
with the country, having put in 
most of the summer there and 
prospected the belt for fifty miles. 
There are already two wells flow- 
ing gas, one at Ontario and the 
other on the Oregon side, across 
the river from Weiser, the latter 
having been supplying gas for 
lighting a farm house for over a 
year. Experts declare that there 
is scarcely a doubt but what oil 
will be found when sufficient 
depth is reached, which can not 
be accurately estimated from sur- 
face indications. — Sumpter Miner. 



IT WILL PAY YOU 

to write to P. O. Box 117, Visalia 
Cal., before you buy OIL STOCK, 
lease or buy OIL LANDS or Oi 
Casing. 






I 



i 



Booklets, Stock Certificates, Letterheads, Envelopes, Dodgers, 
Letter Circulars, etc., 



Oil Prospectuses w % 

i 
I 

Printed at short notice and at reasonable prices. f 

I Pacific Oil Reporter Job Office | 

Rooms 31, 32 and 33 f 

I 318 Pine Street, San Francisco | 

I I 



/""1A.LISTOGA Oil, AND DEVELOPMENT CO. 

are prepared to take contracts to 
develop other property; thoroughly 
equipped for , 

SINKING WELLS QUICKLY AND ECO- 
NOMICALLY. 

Address Calistoga Oil and Development Com- 
pany, 24 Merchants' Exchange, San Francisco. 



/~1YGNET PETROLEUM CO. 

Capital $150,000 

50,000 shares at $3. 

Location — Fresno county. 

Directors— ChaS. L Fair, president, Blitz W Pax- 
ton, vice-president, Chas. A. Lee, treasurer, John 
C. McElroy, secretary. 

Office— 561 Parrott Building. 

Tel.— South 184. 



Z^IUYAMA VALLEY OIL COMPANY. 

Capital 1,000,000 

1,000,000 shares at $1.00. 

Location, 80 acres in 4, 9-25 in Santa Barbara 
County and 80 acres in 15, 10-24 in Kern County. 
Incorporated under the laws of South Dakota. 

Directors— W. H. Turner President; Robt. 
Johnson, Secretary and Treasurer: Andrew 
^hristensen, Frederick Misch, L. M. Bickox; 
Depository, "Western National Bank. 

Pacific States Mining & Investment Company, 
fiscal agents. 

Office— 326 Post Street, San Francisco. 



T"VABNEY OIL COMPANY. 

Incorporated. 
McKittrick district. 16 completed wells; no 
acres proven ground. 
Office, 330 Pine St., Room 5, San Francisco, Cal. 



G 



REAT NORTHERN OIL CO. OF OAKLAND 



Capital $250,000 

250,000 shares at $1 

125,000 shares of treasury stock. 

Location of property, Glenn County, Calif., 2,200 

acres, near Elk Creek, in Stoney Creek Mineral 

district. 

Officers, B F Arnold, President, Geo A Gray 
Secretary. 
Office, 476 Tet.th street, Oakland. 



OBISPO OIL COMPANY. Capital, $1,000,000. 
Number of shares, 1,000,000. Treasury 
stock, 550,000 shares. All stock fully paid and 
non-assessable. Incorporated under the laws of 
California. Properties in Kern, Fresno, San 
Benito and San Luis Obispo counties, Cal. In- 
corporators: G R Parkinson, President Bank of 
Palo Alto; Captain Frank Barrett. Palo Alto. Cal.; 
K W Brown, Fresno, Cal.; Chas E Bond, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. ; C F Alderson Chicago, III. Offi- 
cers: John F Giles, president; Frank Barrett, 
vice president; Chas E Bond, treasurer; C F 
Aldeison. secretary, K W Brown, assistant secre- 
tary. Office, Suite 74. Citizens Bank building. 
iiq-121 La Salle street, Chicago, 111. 



WALDORF OIL AND ASPHALT COMPANY. 
Incorporated Feb 25, 1901. Capital, $500,000. 
500,000 shares at $1.00 per share. Place of busi- 
ness, Kanford, Cal. Headquarters at McCord & 
Son. Location of lands, 1.2, o, Guadalupe, Santa 
Barbara county, Cal. Officers and directors: Geo 
B McCord, president, Hanford; Dr N P Duncan, 
vice-president, Hanford; J O Hickman, treas- 
urer, Hanford; Wm M Madden, attorney for com- 
pany, San Francisco; W H Worswick.fieldsuper- 
intendent. Hanford: F Brader, Hanford, N Weis- 
baum, Hanford, L S Chittenden, Hanford, W H 
Worswick, Jr, Hanford. Jas Manasse, secretary. 



INCORPORATE OR 
INVEST IN ARIZONA 



A 

IF 

you wish to incorporate any en- 
terprise, send for booklet of in- 
formation on corporations and 
copy of Arizona laws, the cheap- 
est and most liberal laws in the 

United States 

We also attend to investments 
or procure information on any 
enterprise in Arizona. Capital 
for investment solicited. Address 

THE WESTERN 
INVESTMENT COMPANY 

ROOMS 1 AND 3 
PORTER BLOCK 

PHOENIX, ARIZONA 



fr»)'fe* , fe»l , 'yr*i''fe*>''«r»!'fe*'fe* , fe» 1 ''yr»i .1 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Oil Well Casing Oil Sills 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets. P. O. Box 231 

Telephone, Main 196. Baker Block. Station C 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 




Business College and 
School of Engineering 



OCCIDENTAL OIL COMPANY 
OF WEST VIRGINIA. 

Capital stock, 600,000 shares par value, $1.00 

Officers— Wm. Crites, president; F M. Graham, 
vice-president; J. B. Batz, treasurer, C. E. Hail- 
stone, secretary; T. I,. Moran, manager; Kern 
Valley Bank, Cal.. depository. 

Mnstellar & Allen, San Francisco Agents, 346 
Parrott Bldg. Telephone. Jessie 1683. 



fVl# LANDS, 
Near Sunset District, 

Kern County, California 
6000 acres. 



For sale or exchange 



-Cheap 



MCAFEE BROTHERS, 
108 Montgomery st. t San Francisco. 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY. Cap'tal stock, 
(2.850.000; Par value, $1.00. Has 2,000 acres 
in Kern, Los Angeles and Summerland fields, 
with 27 producing wells. Officers and directors: 
P V Schermerhorn, president: C H Ritchie, vice- 
president; R D Robinson secretary and treas- 
urer; D M Schennerhorn and W S Morton. Prin 
cipal office, Potomac building. Los Angeles, Cal. 
Tel. John 2281. 



SALINAS OIL AND DEVELOPMENT COM- 
PANY. Capital. $1, 000,000. 1,000.000 shares 
at $1 00. Land in Monterey county. Officers and 
directors: President, W N McCarthy. San Fran- 
cisco; vice-president. J J Gunn Independence; 
treasurer, Wm N McCarthy; secretary T B Olsen, 
San Francisco; superintendent. Jno C Quinn; C A 
BuTChom, J E Baker, N A Dorn. W J Ellis and S 
S Simon, nttornpy, Hon Eugene F Bert. San Fran 
cisco Office, room 573-574 Parrott building, San 
Francisco. 



S 



URETY OIL COMPANY 



Capital $600,000 

600,000 shares par value $1.00 each. 

Location, 240 acres in section 20 and 29 T 3 N R 
16 W, S B M, Los Angeles County, Calif., Newhall 
district 

Officers and, Directors, M Esternaux. President, 
Geo. Greely King, Vice-President, T. H. Pearne, 
Secretary. D. A. Thieme, M. C. White. 

Farmers and Merchants Banks, depository. 

Office, 102 Henne Block, Los Angeles. Calif. 



S 



TANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 



24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

THE CIVIL ENGINEERING COURSE includes Geometry, Trigonometry, Draughting 
Strength of Mateuals, and Surveying. 

THE MINING ENGINEERING COURSE includes Assaying, Blow Pipe Analysis. Mill Con- 
struction. Milling. Mining. Geology, Mineralogy, Economic Geology. Surveying and Mathematics 

ELECTRICAL AND ENGINEERING COURSE Electrical Engineering, Theoretical and 
radical. Work Shop and Laboratory Practice Construction. Mechanical Drawing, Mathematics etc 

THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT of this College affords unexcelled opportunities for 
the acquisition of a business education. Day and Evening Classes. 

jKa^Write Jop new 80-page Catalogue and College Journal. 



Capital 1300,000 

Treasury stock $150,000 

Location: 92 acres leased proven oil land in 
McKittrick; 80 acre^s owned in Coalinga near 
Home Oil company. Fresno; 160 acres owned ad- 
joining oil well in Napa valley. 

Officers: R A Falkenber^, president; R L Bis- 
by, vice-president; M J Henry, secretary; J G 
Steele, treasurer; F Cooke-Caldwell, attorney for 
company. 

Offices: 475-76 Parrott Buildicg, 85.S Market 
street, San Francisco. Cal. 



U. 



S. OIL AND MINING CO. 



Capital $300,000 

Par value, $1 per share. 

Location: 320 acres in Kern River Distric 160 
acres in section 27, 11-24 Sunset district, near Blod- 
gett & Jewett wells, 110 acres onfractiont 26, 12-24. 
near Monarch, adjoining Jewett, Blodget & Beal 
gusher. L- M. Underwood, president, E Ketelhut 
secretary. 

Office— 211 19th street, Bakersfield.lCal, 



For Lease 



Twenty acres of absolutely proven oil 
land in McKittrick district to lease on 
royalty basis for development work. 
Chance for good, responsible driller. 
Securities required. 

For further particulars, address, 

W. G. KERCEHOFF 

Wilcox Block, Los Angeles. 



SUNSET 
LIMITED 



One of the most magnificent trains 
ever built. For 1901-1902 TRi-WEEKtY 
via Coast Line and Sunset Route for 

NEW ORLEANS and 

NEW YORK 

Leave SAN FRANCISCO 4:50 p. m. 
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays. 

Leave LOS ANGELES 8:30 p. in. 
Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays. 

Arrive NEW ORLEANS 7:20 p. m. 
Thursdays, Saturdays, Mondays. 

Among the world's noted Highways of 
Travel not one equals the route of this 
train. Get the little book, "Wayside 
Notes," from any agent of the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Initial trip of Sunset Limited 
Friday, Dec. 6, from San Francisco. 



Oil Stocks 

Sold in New York and all Eastern 
Markets. Oil, copper and gold com- 
panies financed. 

Hillyer, Clarke & Co.. 

Bankers and Brokers, 
52 Broadway, New York. 



PACFICOIL REPORTER. 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pumps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 



'5 



Crane co. 



H. T. LALLY, Manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. 
24 FREMONT ST. 



San Francisco, Cal 




Smith=Premier £ 
Typewriters * 

Are Used Everywhere 

READ THIS LIST: 
Heald's Business College use. 30 
Southern Pacihc Co. system ..47 

Western Union TeL Co 36 

S. F. Public Schools now use. . .43 

S. F. Call " . ...21 

Hale Bros " 14 

Viavi Co " 13 

Cogswell College ' 11 

Miller, Scott & Sloss . " 10 



Get information from us about 
the new SPEED Device. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

no Montgomerj St., S. F. 



nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDuaanranDna 
a a 

g Before buying Oil Stock or g 

a leasing or buying Oil Lands n 

g call on A. BARIEAU, Room ° 

g 23 Columbian Building, oi6g 

n Market Street, San Franc iscon 
□ n 

unnnnQnnnnnnDnnQDQunnnDpnp 



American Tool Works ' s C00PE » c • *• ■ " 

219 Crocker Building 

SAN FRANCISCO 



JOSEPH EASTWOOD, Proprietor. 



MANIPACTIRHRS OF 



Standard and Special Drilling Tools 



All Sizes of Hoagland's Patent Casing 
Spears Tor Rent. 



SPKCIAI.TIKS 

Petroleum Oil, Asphaltum and 
kindred hydrocarbons 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 



109=111 Mission Street, 4I6, 4 ' 8 * 2 °- *"• 424 - 426 

Sansome St., San Francisco 



Bet. Spear and Main 

Telephone, Main 5578. 



Patent 
Redwood 



OIL TANKS 




42[feet diameter. 18 feet high. Capacity, 177,500 gallons. 



Atlas Pipe Wrench 



Received highest award at Pan-American Exposition, Buffalj, N. Y., 1901. 



IT HAS 




NO THREADS 
TO STRIP 



Made in four sizes — 10, 18, 24 and 36 inches. 

Atlas Tube Cleaner 

Received highest award at Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, N. Y., 1901 



For Water=tube 
Boilers 




It Has No 
Equal 



Write for circulars. Ask your supply man. 
Manufactured by 

ATLAS PIPE WRENCH CO. F[ °° d K? a g ncisc0 . 

New York Office, 121 Liberty Street Works, New Haven, Conn. 



Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 



We c*ny the ijirgm Slock. Our price, are 
Kqultable. 

Tel. Main, 1188. 



When you want to swear go to 

LEE D. CRAIG 

Notary Public and 
Commissioner of Deeds 



316 Montgomery St, 

bet. Califorcia 

and Pine, Sar> Francisco. 



The Road to Wealth 

Headquarters School and Governmen 
Lands. 

Lands all counties in California. No conditions 
on School Lands as to residence or cultivation 
Only $1.25 an acre. Locati;j.a in all Mineral Belt. 
— Kern River, McKittrick, Devil's Den, Mojave, 
Sunset, Coalings and other famous districts, The 
Cheapest, Safest and Surest Investment in Amer ; 
ca. Send Stamp for Land Book. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. BrOadway 
Los Angeles, California. 

400,000 Shares of Oil Stock 



DIVIDENDS. 

Dividend No. i was declared by the Ventura 
Consolidated Crude Oil Company Nov. 15th. 
Regular dividends will be paid quarterly here- 
after. Company has 4 producing wells No. 5 
drilling; 2720 acres of oil land; also rich gold mine 
in Aiizona. To continue rapid development 
work a block of treasury stock is being sold at 
20 cents per share, par value, $1.00. — Pull paid — 
Non-assessable. Reliable agent wanted. Ad- 
dress all orders for stock or further particulars to 

W. G. YOUNG & CO., 

Fiscal Agents. 
628-30 Laughlin Bldg., Los Angeles, C»l. 



The Star Drilling Machine 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machin 
oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 
ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. 




Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 



The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expeose of operating for oil or gas. 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a Iim : t of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 
recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 8co-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are simple, 
powerful aud efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Territory 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO. 



i6 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Cable Systems for Hard-Rock Formations , . . 

HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS for Quicksands 
and Clays 

COMBINATION OUTFITS for any condition 



Standard Drilling and Fishing Tools 



PORTABLE DRILLING RIGS 

MADE IN SIZES TO SUIT TERRITORY 

SIMPLE. POWERFUL EFFICIENT. 



i j— i m ^ ^*^^^^^^ **£•* *«C > * . *^^^ ,, S'*! 




Standard Wrought Iron Pipe, Cast Iron and Malleable Fittings, Oil Well Casing, Tubing, Drive and Line Pipe, 

Brass and Iron Valves. FUEL OIL BURNING APPLIANCES. 

Catalogues, Estimates and Specifications furnished on application. 

GEORGE H. TAY COMPANY 

49 to 53 First Street, San Francisco 
CALL ON US FOR PRICES AND INFORMATION. 




For prices, etc., inquire 



W. FORGIE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil & Gas Well Rig Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San 
Francisco, Cal„ Bakersfield, Cal. 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wrench SSSS^'S 




Djilllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND "MONEY SAVED. 

It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits. 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 




Harron, Rfckard & McCone 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 

21 and 23 FREMONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



OIL WELL DRiLLING MACHINERY 

TOOLS AND SUPPLIES 

ENGINES, BOILERS, PUMPS, ETC. 

BOSTON CASING 

FISHING TOOLS FOR RENT 

Prompt Delivery. Correspondence Solicited. 
Agents for STAR Portable Drilling Machines 






endorsed by the California Petroleum Miners' Association. 




50c Asphaltum Refinery 50c 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure 

Gilt=Edged Stock 



Inside of two months this valuable 

We leased land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have just secured 

6000 ACRES 6000 ACRES 

of land that produces untold quantities of asphalt 
near Sargents Station. 



stock will cost you One Dollar. 

We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
asphalt at a figure which will enable us to pay divi- 
dends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract carload lots for crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses are erected and Refining Works 
NOW COMPLETED. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned inside of 90 
days. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $20 per ton 
is better than the Trinidad at $35. 



STANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY 

Capitalization Only 300,000 Shares at $1 par Value. Stock Nonassessable. 

475=476 Parrot* Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 






H*£*iik*;ik*iik9>ik*>ik»>1&+i*L. *ik*>±k0>'U*iik9>-ikPitk*>il?9 0X&9Hk»>1ic»i&9StkKti 



| 



I 



i 
i 



$100 BUYS 

200 SHARES 
OIL STOCKS 

T n Ai Oil Company; 200 barrel well. Stock sold in lots 
of $100 and up. Guaranteed against loss by 

Security Gold Bond 

Indorsed by a Trust Company of $1,000,000 paid up capi- 
tal. Cash returned at maturity of bond. Safe, legitimate. 
Investigate. Stock shares in all dividends and profits. 
Handsome illustrated booklets of oil fields, with official 
map, for 10 cents in stamps. 



VWANNV*/*/ 



Room 506, 167 Dearborn Street, Chicogo. 

Home Office, Room 7, first floor, Mills Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



J 

I 



J 

4 

! 

1 



ILLINOIS OIL BOND COMPANY | 

I 



THE BEST CASING PULLER 

The Norton Ratchet Jack 



With Ring and Slips for Pulling 
Casing. 



ALWAYS SAFE, READY AND EFFECTIVE 



This jack is self lubricating, pro- 
vided with ball bearings, giving 
maximum of efficiency with mini- 
mum of friction. No blocking re- 
quired, as the hold of the ring and 
slips is absolute. Convenient to 
operate, light and durable. For 
prices and particulars address 

M. G. WEST, 216 California Street, San Francisco. 




Bovaird & Seyfang Mf g Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF - 



Stationary and Portable Boilers, Steam Engines, 

Iron Tanks, Rig Iron Outfits, Drilling and Fish'ng Tools, 

And everything needed to drill and operate 



Oil, Gas and Artesian Wells 

Manufacturers' Agents for Tubing, Casing, Pipe Fittings, Valves, Etc. 

Natural Gas Plants a Specialty. 

Cable address, "Boang." ABC and Private Codes. 

BRADFORD, PA., U. S. A. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 3. No. 8. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAI^, FRIDAY iqoi. 



CONCERNING GAS ENGINES. 



How to Make and How to Use This Valuable 

Machine. 



An Engine That le Becoming of Great Importance in 
Every Oil District of California. 



The following article on the 
subject of fuel consumption and 
lubrication of gas engines is 
worthy of careful perusal. It is 
contributed to The American 
Manufacturer by Albert Stritt- 
matter: 

It is not so comm«nly recog- 
nized as it should be that what is 
usually called a gas or a gasoline 
engine is in reality a gas and air 
engine. In other words, it is not 
usually recognized that such 
types of engines must have air as 
well as gas or gasoline. The im- 
portance of the air will be seen 
when It is remembered that for 
gas or gasoline to burn or ex- 
plode there must be a certain 
amount of air or oxygen present. 
The force of the explosion, there- 
fore, varies according to the pro- 
portion of air to gas or gasoline. 
A ratio of one volume of gas to 
seven volumes of air is considered 
to give the strongest explosion, 
although anywhere from one of 
gas to from three to filteen of air 
will make a strong explosion, de- 
pending on the quality of the gas 
used. As gas varies so greatly in 
the number of heat units it con- 
tains, the best ratio cannot be de- 
termined without a knowledge of 
the quality of the gas under con- 
sideration. 

As the economical consumption 
of fuel in the ordinary commercial 
gas engine is of very great im- 
portance, it may be well to con- 
sider some of the effects of the 
wrong adjustment of the fuel 
supply. Of course in the so called 
throttling engines, the ratio of 
the gas and air is not supposed to 
be under the control of the opera- 
tor. Suppose we have an engine 
of the hit-and-miss type, burning 
with the mixtures of fuel at the 
proportion of gas or gasoline to 
air which gives the strongest pos- 
sible explosion. The engine will 
therefore get the most power pos- 
sible from each charge and will 
take as few charges as are neces- 
sary to maintain the speed. We 
thus have a maximum of power 
from a minimum of fuel the con- 
dition desired. Suppose, how- 
ever, the operator thinks he has 
not power enough and he will 
give it more fuel to get additional 
power. This is a pretty common 
method of procedure, but a very 



erroneous one, for the following 
reason: By increasing the amount 
of gas or gasoline he has a richer 
mixture of fuel. In other words, 
if he has been running on a ratio 
of one volume of gas to seven of 
air, he may now have one of gas 
to only four or five of air. The 
mixture is therefore getting more 
gas than there is air to unite with 
to give the strongest explosion. 
If the gas supply is still further 
increased, it may make so rich a 
mixture that the spark will fail to 
ignite the charge altogether. That 
is, as the amount of gas increases, 
the volume of air of course not 
being increased, the weaker is the 
explosion, until finally the charge 
will not ignite at all from the com- 
paratively small spark in the 
cylinder, although it might ignite 
if a burning match or torch was 
held to it. 

On the other hand, suppose the 
operator thinks he is using too 
much fuel and therefore cuts it 
down. As he does so, the charge 
gets weaker until it, too, will not 
ignite, there not being enough gas 
or gasoline to take fire from the 
spark. 

With the throttling type of en- 
gine, however, there are two 
styles to be considered. First, 
there is the tpye where the ratio 
of gas or gasoline to air remains 
constant, only the quantity of the 
charge being varied. In this, of 
course, the proportion of air to 
the fuel is always the same, but if 
the load gets too light the charge 
is reduced in size to such an ex- 
tent that it is not compressed suffi- 
ciently to be ignited. Second, 
there is the type of engine in 
which the amount of air remains 
constant and the amount of gas or 
gasoline is varied with the load. 
With this there is only one point 
at which a maximum explosion is 
secured, and as the supply of gas 
or gasoline is reduced the force of 
the explosion is also reduced. In 
these two latter types "it is seen 
that the fuel consumption is in- 
creased, but the manufacturers 
claim that this is over-balanced by 
the increased regularity in speed 
by gaining an impulse at every 
other revolution, as compared with 
the hit-and-miss engine which 
must have a very sensitive gov- 
ernor to give a regularity of speed. 

But aside from the fuel con- 



sumption, there are other evils 
icMilting from the improper feed- 
ing of the fuel. When the charge 
is so rich that it will not easily 
ignite, 1. e., may sometimes IgDltC 
and sometimes fail, there results 
exhaust pipe explosions. One 
charge may not be ignited and is 
exhausted unburned. The next 
charge may ignite and the large, 
hot flame from it when exhausted 
will ignite the charge previously 
exhausted and cause the explosion 
in the pipe. This may also occur 
from a charge which is a little too 
weak to be ignited every time. 
These explosions in the exhaust 
pipe, while not ordinarily danger- 
ous, are somewhat terrifying to 
one who does not know from what 
causes they occur. Sometimes 
they are violent enough, however, 
to crack the exhaust pot or break 
the muffler plates, if made of thin 
metal. Or, if the pipe exhausts 
into a chimney flue without being 
carried clear to the top, it may re- 
sult in damage to the chimney. 

If too much fuel is being fed 
there is a great deal of smoke and 
soot formed by the unconsumed 
fuel. This deposits on the igniter 
points, causing failure to ignite. 
If there is an auxiliary exhaust 
port, it deposits in this and mixing 
with the lubricating oil forms a 
gummy, sticky mass, partially or 
entirely filling up the port and 
causing back pressure in the 
cylinder. I have known of in- 
stances in which this condition 
had actually existed so long 
that the auxiliary ports were al- 
most entirely filled. The result 
was that the burned gas did not 
entirely escape and fouled the in- 
coming charges to such an extent 
that very weak explosions resulted, 
"side from the fact that many of 
the charges would not ignite at 
all. This unconsumed carbon also 
deposits on the exhaust valve and 
seat, the valve stem, etc., and 
these parts become so gummed up 
that the valve works stiffly, does 
not seat properly, and therefore 
needs frequent regrinding to hold 
the compression. 

When, to this condition of too 
much fuel supply, is added that of 
too much lubricating oil, matters 
become still worse. And It is 
generally the case that the man 
who gives the engine too much 
fuel, gives it too much lubricating 
oil. The result is that the surplus 
works back into the combustion 
chamber and is partially burned. 
It then deposits in the auxiliary 
exhaust port, on the exharst valve, 
stem, etc., as described of the ex- 
cessive fuel supply. The result 
is that when this condition exists 
there is sometimes some doubts in 
the mind of the operator as to 
whether he is feeding too much 
fuel or too much lubricating oil, 
or both. The best thing to do is 



Prick, Tkn Cents 

to cut down the fuel supply. If 
this is the sole cause, the smoke 
from the exhaust will soon cease. 
If it continues cut down the supply 
of lubricating oil. As there will 
be considerable oil in the cylinder, 
there will continue to be a smoky 
exhaust until this surplus is 
burned out. Of course the ex- 
haust valve should be taken out 
and cleaned well, also the exhaust 
port should be cleaned out. 

In this connection it might be 
well to say that only special gaso- 
line engine oil should be used in 
the cylinder. As one writer says 
on this subject: "The very best 
grade of cylinder oil used in steam 
engines is about the worst thing 
that can be used in the cylinder 
of a gas engine, for the reason 
that it clots and carbonizes from 
the intense dry heat." Good gas 
engine cylinder oil costs less than 
steam engine cylinder oil, and, as 
above stated, it is made to stand 
the enormous dry heat of the gas 
engine cylinder. The igniting 
mechanism in the cylinder heat, 
if there is any which is exposed to 
the intense heat of the cylinder, 
should also be oiled with this grade 
of oil. Good machine oil is good 
enough for the other parts of the 
engine and will answer every pur- 
pose. Above all things, never use 
filtered oil for the cylinder or 
crank pins unless you are abso- 
lutely sure that no particles of 
dirt or grit are in it. This should 
be carefully borne in mind as 
many engines have been ruined 
by using filtered oil which con- 
tained gritty dirt. Of course 
everyone knows that if too little 
lubricating oil is used there will 
be disastrous results. The bear- 
ings will get hot and the cylinder 
and piston will heat and cut and 
there will be no end of troubles. 

While this question of lubricat- 
ing oil apparently has not much 
to do with the question of the fuel 
supply, I have been led to refer to 
to it here because the two are so 
closely related to the proper re- 
sults to be obtained from a gas 
engine, and because where one is 
not properly attended to it is very 
often the case that the other is 
not. It will therefore be seen 
that the questions of proper adjust- 
ment of the supply of fuel and of 
lubricating oil are questions of 
importance to those who are de- 
sirous of obtaining the best results. 
Proper attention to these points 
will result in efficient and reliable 
power at a very low cost, and will 
add several years to the life of the 
engine. It will also save much 
time which would otherwise be 
spent in trying to get the engine 
to run when it is in no condition 
to do so. To these beneficial re- 
sults should also be added the 
additional comfort and freedom 
from worry of the operator and 
his therefore increased usefulness. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



OIL AT SARGENTS. 



Rigs Ape Working and Much As- 
phaltum is Being Shipped. 

Sargents Is a station on the 
Southern Pacific Railroad six miles 
southeast of Gilroy and is located 
on the Sargent estate. This estate 
was created by the energy and 
sagacity of James Sargent, a Cali- 
fornia pioneer, and brother of 
United States Senator A. A. Sar- 
gent. The station is located at the 
point where the Pajaro River 
leaves the Santa Clara valley and 
cuts its way through the Coast 
Range to the ocean. 

THE OIL DEVELOPMENT. 

The industrial development ac 
Sargents consists principally in 
the development of oil properties 
and the large asphaltum beds on 
the Sargent estate. 

James A. Sargent succeeded his 
father, James Sargent, in the man- 
agement of the property at the 
death of the latter two years ago. 
The estate consists of about 8000 
acres of land in the vicinity of 
Sargents Station, much of which 
land is known to contain large as- 
phaltum beds of unknown value, 
and it is believed that the oil in- 
dustry will be of great value in 
the near future. 

Three oil rigs are now in opera- 
tion. Two near the station and 
one at some distance in the hills. 
The two wells near the station are 
being drilled by James Bran'ton 
for the Pajaro Oil Company and 
the Alberta Oil Company, respec- 
tively. On the Pajaro company's 
property the hole is down 900 feet, 
but indications are uncertain,owing 
to the surface of the ground being 
considerably higher than the hole 
on the Alberta, which, though 
down only the same distance, 
shows excellent indications of be- 
coming a producer. Two oil seep- 
ages have been cut by the drill 
and blue clay has been reached. 
Each well is equipped with a 
standard rig. Both rigs are tem- 
porarily Idle pending the arrival 
of necessary repairs from San 
Francisco. 

Three miles northwest of the 
station the Watsonville Oil Com- 
pany is established and began 
drilling December 8th. This corn- 
has also a standard rig and a large 
amount of pipe, etc. Their total 
investment, including the rig, 
tools, casing, etc., amounts to about 
$10,000. The company is a close 
corporation, no stock being for 
sale. The stock is owned by 
wealthy citixens of Watsonville 
and is fully paid up. Many years 
ago a well was drilled a few hun- 
dred yards above where the pres- 
ent company is operating, and the 
old well supplies the rig now ope- 
rating with oil for fuel by means 
of a pipe line. 

CITY STREET IMPROVEMENT COM- 
PANY. 

The City Street Improvement 
Company has leased 6000 acres of 



land from Mr. Sargent for ten 
years, with the privilege of ten 
years more, and they in turn have 
entered into an arrangement with 
the Standard Rock Oil Company 
to do the actual development work. 
George Griffiths, one of the best 
authorities upon all matters con- 
cerning asphaltum and its uses 
and value, is manager of the latter 
company, and is now on the ground 
getting ready. The San Jose Mer- 
cury says an agent of the com- 
pany is now in Chicago endeavor- 
ing to secure a volume of business 
which will justify the company in 
building large works for the refin- 
ing of the product. 

The Standard Rock Oil Com- 
pany has already commenced de- 
velopment work and its stills are 
turning out a large amount of the 
product daily. Much crude as- 
phaltum is also shipped. 

In many places large deposits of 
almost pure petroleum may be 
seen cropping out on the hill- 
sides. The country is open and 
easy of access, which will render 
mining an easy matter. Exhaust- 
ive tests show the percentage of 
petroleum to be 45 in the crude 
state. The company intends to 
refine the rock on the ground and 
ship the finished product in bar- 
rels. 

Professor Joseph L,e Conte paid 
many visits to the locality during 
the later years of his life and was 
profoundly interested in the for- 
mations to be seen. It is a peculiar 
fact that the country surrounding 
Sargents Station is regarded by 
observers of seismic disturbances 
as being the center from which 
the disturbances arise, and it is 
the opinion of the oil men here 
that some phenomenal wells will 
be struck here soon. Whether or 
not there is any connection be- 
tween disturbances of the eatth's 
crust and the peculiar formations 
that exist here remains to be de 
termined. 

NEW OIL TANKS. 



daily movement of cars is from 
3000 to 4000. The fact that we 
have been short on motive power 
has caused our trouble, but by 
shipping through New York 
freight on ships we have relieved 
twelve or fifteen engines, which 
will be hurried to the points most 
needed. 

"Fuel oil will be used altogether 
on our entire system within a few 
months, and we have just put in a 
contract for 500 oil tanks to be 
distributed along the line, with a 
capacity of 300 barrels each, which 
is equivalent to 1000 cars cf the 
kind now in use. By next June 
we expect to have our through 
dining-car service in operation." 

El Paso and the Southern Pa- 
cific have been locking horns of 
late regarding tne action of the 
railroad company in putting in an 
immense fuel oil tank almost in 
the center of the city. The in- 
surance companies represented 
here have threatened to draw en- 
tirely from the field if the South- 
ern Pacific was allowed to fill the 



tank with oil, and the city council 
is upholding the insurance com- 
panies. 

Widens the District. 

A gusher brought in a few days 
ago widens the Beaumont oil field 
125 feet. It will encourage drill- 
ing in the territory surrounding 
Spindletop hill, supposed to be 
dry. New York men own much 
of this ground. The new well is 
175 feet from the edge of the hill. 
The inability of the Southern Pa- 
cific to furnish locomotives has 
aggravated the transportation 
situation, which was already a 
serious problem' through lack of 
sufficient cars 



Use Either Coal or Oil. 

Two vessels, said to be the first 
of their kind capable of using 
either coal or oil as fuel, will soon 
be ready for launching at Cam- 
den, N. J. Each vessel is 371 feet 
long, 46 feet "beam and 314 feet 
depth, and will have a registered 
tonnage of about 4,500. They 
will be in the service of the 
American-Hawaii Steamship com- 
pany. — Manufacturers Record. 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY 



Potomac Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



-REMEMBER- 



Plans of the Southern Pa 
ciiric to Burn Oil. 

A dispatch from El Paso on the 
21st inst. quotes Julius Krutt- 
schnitt. general manager of the 
Southern Pacific railroad, as fol- 
lows: 

"The unprecedented wave of 
prosperity in railway circles has 
caused the Southern Pacific some 
little trouble in the matter of 
equipment of the road. We have 
just given an order for sixty freight 
engines, ten switch engines and 
five passenger engines, in addi- 
tion to the contract given some 
time ago for 100 engines, a part of 
which are now being delivered. 
For some time past we have been 
short daily about 1000 cars, al- 
though the Southern Pacific, with 
a trackage of 8000 miles, has been 
less bothered than most of the 
roads, and the shortage has meant 
only a delay of twenty-four hours 
in handling our business, as our 



The Potomac has a producing plant in the Kern River field. 
The Potomac has a producing plant in the Los Angeles field. 
The Potomac has a producing plant in the Summerland field. 
The Potomac has twenty-seven wells producing oil. 
The Potomac owns its properties and has no debts. 
The Potomac has an annual capacity of 360,000 barrels. 
The Potomac has an annual contract for 180,000 barrels. 
The Potomac has skilled operators drilling night and day. 
The Potomac has the very best of management. 
The Potomac has the finest equipment. 
The Potomac will soon double its production. 

The Potomac has the endorsement of bankers, manufacturers, mer- 
chants and investors generally. 
The Potomac is selling a small block of stock at 50 cents. 

MORE INFORMATION FOR THE ASKING. 

ADDRESS 

POTOMAC OIL COMPANY 

Potomac Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



DRILLING ENGINES 



THE CLOSE 

This is absolutely the quickest, most durable and handsomest engine 
on the market. Features no other engine has . . . ' . 

Second Hand Drilling and 
Pumping Fn^n"" rfffci 

Re-hauled and in perfect condition at rock bottom prices 

HERE'S YOUR CHANCE 

1 6 H. P. High Grade Gas Engine 1 10 H. P. High Grade Gas Engine 
I 8 H. P. High Grade Gas Engine 1 15 H. P. High Grade Gas Engine 

At wholesale or dealers' prices. These engines are new and guaranteed 

Address PENNSYLVANIA DRILLING CO. 

BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 

Or CLOSE & JAMES, Cor. Main and Alhambra streets, Los Angeles, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



CORNELIUS VANDERBILT 



Lecture By the Millionaire So- 
ciety Leader and Inventor. 

The lecture room at the Walker 
building, Boston could not hold 
one quarter of the people who 
gathered to hear Cornelius Van- 
derbilt, the millionaire society 
leader, inventor and locomotive 
professor, give his lecture on loco- 
motive boilers before the Society 
of Arts last week. For over an 
hour before the opening of the 
lecture society leadersand students 
pushed and jostled each other try- 
ing to secure a pluce in the room 
which was filled half an hour be- 
fore the lecturer appeared, dressed 
in an evening Tuxedo suit. 

The appearance of the >oung 
man created the greatest applause, 
and while many were present who 
knew little or nothing of the 
merits of the lecture, they devoted 
the greatest attention to him. 
Vanderbilt proved to be a cool, 
self possessed joung man, who 
knew thoroughly what he was 
talking about, and went into the 
discussion of locomotive boilers in 
a business manner, with no at- 
tempts at oratorical effect. He 
illustrated his discussion with 
many stereopticon views, which 
he explained to the audience. 

The development of the fire- 
box, in particular, claimed the lec- 
turer's attention. And his own 
invention, the so-called Vander-I 
bilt boiler, was carefully ex- 
plained. A photograph of the | 



first one made was shown, it being 
at the time it was cast the largest 
gated furnace ever made. 
•e corrugated fire-boxes were 
first used on the New York Cen- 
tral railroad, and are now in opera- 
tion on a dozen or more roads in 
'all parts of the country Mr. Van- 
derbilt acknowledged his indebt- 
edness to I.entz, the German in- 
ventor, who made a somewhat 
similar fire-box long ago, and also 
showed that the locomotive manu- 
facturers themselves had made im- 
provements on his own original 
designs. He was very modest 
throughout the whole discourse. 
Mr. Vanderbilt is now experi- 
menting on a new oil burner of 
which great things are expected. 



In Old Kentucky. 

The Mayfield Oil company, 
capitalized at $1,500,000, is a new 
concern that will soon begin 
operations in the Kentucky and 
Tennessee oil fields. The com- 
pany owns in fee simple and con- 
trols by lease 30,000 acres of land 
in the oil belt iu the states named. 
The officers of the company are: 
J. C. Mayfield, president; Charles 
Sykes, vice-president; Harry S. 
Anderson, second vice-president; 
J. H. Zarecor, secretary and 
treasurer; Judson G. Daun, assist- 
ant secretary; F. G. Burt, general 
manager, and J. E. Jones, assistant 
general manager. 



KERR'S REPORTS 

(Inc.) 

MONTHLY OIL INVESTMENT 

TABLES 

Give prices, capitalization, assets, character ot 
charter, integrity of management and methods, 
well progress, production and location of oil 
corporations, etc.; official maps. 

We have oil field investigators, ab- 
stract searchers and credit examin- 
ers, the only systematized oil rating agency in 
the world. Authentic Special Reports on 
any oil company, $2.00 upward. 

We have a list of 3000 oil companies; 500 
fraudulent; 800 honest but hopelessly involved 
or Incompetent. Do you own stock in 
any of them? 

Subscribe for KERR'S REPORTS 

MONTHLY and keep posted . . . 

One Dollar per year 

Address KERR'S REPORTS, Mills Building, 

San Francisco, California 



Cable Systems for Hard-Rock Formations , , « 

HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS for Quicksands 
and Clays 

COMBINATION OUTFITS for any condition 

Standard Drilling and Fishing Tools 

PORTABLE DRILLING RIGS 

MADE IN SIZES TO SUIT TERRITORY 

SIMPLE. POWERFUL. EFFICIENT. 




=S£ 



Standard Wrought Iron Pipe, Cast Iron and Malleable Fittings, Oil Well Casing, Tubing, Drive and Line Pipe, 

Brass and Iron Valves. FUEL OIL BURNING APPLIANCES. 

Catalogues, Estimates and Specifications furnished on application. 

GEORGE H. TAY COMPANY 

49 to 53 First Street, San Francisco 
CALL ON US FOR PRICES AND INFORMATION, 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

(Indorsed By the California Petroleum 
Miners' Association. 



W. B. WINN. Editor and Publisher 
Office and Editorial rooms 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



Telephone, Bush, 176 
TERMS 

One Year $250 

Six Months 1 5° 

Three Months 1 00 

Single Copies 10c 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE 



Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Re- 
porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco, rooms 
3i-32r>33. Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name and. address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 



Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal 
as second-class matter. 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1901 



compete successfully with any in- 
dividual company which attempts 
to compete with it. 

At present the Standard holds 
the trump hand. Those who 
bravely state they can compete 
with it deserve credit for their 
courage, but their prospects for 
success are not particularly bright. 



The exports for the past eleven 
months exceed 
Law of Supply the highest 
and Demand previous record 
for the same 
time by 45,951,670 gallons. 

The exports for the present 
year should the month of Decem- 
ber equal the aveiage for that 
month for the previous six years, 
will exceed the largest amount in 
any previous year by over 50,000,- 
000 gallons. 

The net stocks of Pennsylvania 
oil have declined in the past five 
months 2,487,126 barrels. 

In the same time, the production 



conditions seemed most promising. 
Standard oil dividends must be 
paid, even if the children of some 
poor devil of an oil producer are 
compelled to go without Christmas 
presents. 



LOS ANGELES OIL. 



Prospects of a Largely Increased 
Demand. 

Not many men engaged in the 
oil industry in the Los Angeles 
field are willing to admit that the 
outlook in this industry is not 
promising. On the contrary, they 
say the prospects are full of prom- 
ise and that the future will demon- 
strate this sanguine belief. 

While it is admitted that the 
production, which now is reported 
to be about 90,000 barrels a month, 
is in excess of consumption, the 
the new uses that are being found 
for the product are a forerunner 
of an increased consumption. 

With the completion of the pro- 
posed refineries, the crude product 



In its last issue the Pittsburgh 
Petroleum Ga- 
They Are All zettesays: "Al- 
Right Now though fuel oil 

is plentiful in 
California, and it has been giving 
satisfaction to those who have 
been using it instead of other fuel, 
some of the largest concerns that 
have been using it in San Fran- 
cisco are changing back to coal. 
The trouble is in the professed in- 
ability of the railroad companies, 
more particularly the Southern 
Pacific, to furnish adequate trans- 
portation. No doubt there will be 
the coincidence of the disappear- 
ance of thH inability about the 
time the Standard becomes es- 
tablished to its liking there." 

Although this was true a month 
ago concerning several of the large 
consumers of fuel oil, it is not true 
now. 

Several of the large producing 
oil companies, being unable to 
make the railroads haul their oil, 
and hence being unable to fill 
contracts, turned these contracts 
over to the Standard, which has 
tank cars galore. Since then the 
large consumers have had no com- 
plaint to make about lack of oil. 

It is commonly asserted that the 
Standard Oil company is about 
the largest owner of the stock 
both of the Southern Pacific com- 
pany and the Santa Fe. If this 
report be true it is easy to ex- 
plain why the railroads should 
pursue a policy which should 
prove advantageous to the Stand- 
ard. 

Others assert the railroads will 
not augment the number of their 
tank cars when in six months the 
Standard will have its pipe line 
completed, and will be able to 
pipe oil from Kern county to the 
bay at 20 cents or less. 

This is less than the railroads 
can transport it for and means the 
Standard will be in a position to 



OUR NEW YEAR'S EDITION. 




The annual New Year's edition of the Pacific Oii, 
Reporter will bs published next Friday, January 3rd. 

This edition will be noteworthy among oil publica- 
tions which have heretofore appeared, not only on 
account of its beautiful appearance, but more especially 
on account of its contents. 

It will contain a number of special articles from 
those prominent as scientists, geologists, practical 
drillers, and successful oil men generally. 

It will cover every oil district in the state. 

It will be beautifully illustrated with half tone re- 
productions. 

It will contain statistical information that will be 
exact and reliable. 

Orders for advertising should be sent in not later than 
Tuesday next. 



H 
p 

n 

H 
m 
H 
H 

H 

n 

n 

n 
n 
n 

m 

H 
if 

H 

m 

m 

m 

m 
H 



IS ALL RIGHT. 



The Kind of Property One Likes 
To Invest In. 

If you desire to give a New 
Year's gift no better present can 
be made than a block of stock of 
a good oil company operating in a 
proven field. 

There are two kinds of stock to 
choose from. There is the stock 
of a company that already has 
producing wells. The other kind 
is that of a company that has no 
wells yet but undoubtedly will 
have them when deve lopment 
work commences. 

The Yankee Girl Oil company 
complies with both these condi- 
tions. It already has two good 
producers in Los Angeles, will 
soon be drilling in Kern, and has 
land in Sunset and in San Benito 
county. 

The stock -is selling very well 
both here and in the east. The 
management understands the ol 
business from A to Z, and no one 
can possibly regret having pur- 
chased the stock of such a reliable 
company as the Yankee Girl. 



as shown by the runs, has gone 
down 6,429 barrels daily. 

Here is a mysterious example of 
the law of supply and demand. 

With increasing consumption, 
the less the production and the 
net stocks, the less the price. 



This month eight million dollars 
in dividends were 
Immense paid to holders of 
Dividends Standard Oil Com- 
pany's stock. 

That is all very well for the 
stockholders, but the producers 
would like it a little better if the 
Standard would pay a better price 
for oil. It is curious, if the de- 
mand for oil in the east is increas- 
ing and the supply diminishing, 
that the price of oil is lessening. 

For more than a year oil pro- 
ducers have been looted, and now 
the Standard buccaneers make a 
bold holdup of ten cents per bar- 
rel in one day and at a time when 



will find a market. With the ex- 
pansion of commercial and indus- 
trial enterprises, it is asserted the 
output will find a steady sale, and 
that prices will possibly feel the 
reflex of this energy. 

According to the Herald, one 
who is well up in the affairs that 
appertain to the oil industry said 
that by actual measurement he 
has found that the unpaved streets 
of Los Angeles, if paved with as- 
phaltum, are sufficient to consume 
thousands of tons of asphatum, 
and that from this source alone 
the local field would draw an 
enormous revenue. This gentle- 
man, while an operator, is of the 
opinion that Los Angeles should 
be the best paved city in the 
world, as it has the product on its 
back doorstep. Other cities thai 
are struggling with the paving 
problem must import the material, 
while here it is obtained less the 
cost of freight and other inci- 
dentals. 



Los Angeles Stocks. 

The closing weeks of the year have 
been fairly active ones on the Los Ange- 
les Stock Board. During the seven days 
ending Saturday, December 21st, the 
volume of trading was considerably in 
excess of the two weeks previous, and a 
notable feature of the business was the 
fact that mining stocks figured promi- 
nently among the active traders. There 
has been a tendency for some time to- 
ward a wider interest in mining stocks 
and the business of the exchange ap- 
pears already to have verified the predic- 
tion made some months ago that ulti- 
mately this class of business would pre- 
dominate on the floor of the exchange. 
Prices have not suffered greatly during 
recent trading, nor indeed have they 
made any material advances. The usual 
variations from yi to a point and a point 
and one-half were registered by several 
of the better known securities, but on the 
whole the list remained firm at the old 
prices. 

Reed Crude, as usual, is fairly active, 
the prevailing price being 33J4 cents. 
Westlake sold at $yi and 5%. Although 
the bidding has been strong for Fuller- 
ton Con. it has been impossible to shake 
out any of this stock at prevailing rates. 

Wedge mining stock was one of the 
leading traders of the week. 

Among the bank stocks State Bank & 
Trust Company and Citizens National 
were the favorites. The latter advanced 
from $136 to f 140, at which figure some 
trading was done. 

Among the miscellaneous securities 
Edison Electric advanced a figure, while 
the Pacific Electrical Company's paper 
continued to decline. 



Indian Oil. 

The production of petroleum in 
India, which is confined to Burma 
and Assam, amounted to 38,000,000 
gallons in 1900, about 3j,ooo,oop 
gallons being of Burman produc- 
tion. Although the production 
has expanded very largely, it is 
still insufficient for the require- 
ments of the Indian market, which 
are met by the importation of 
some 72,000,000 gallons from the 
United States and Russia. It may 
be said that, roughly, of every 100 
gallons of petroleum used in India 
one-third is of local production, 
two-thirds being imported. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



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For sale by Jobbers of Oil Well Supplies Through= 
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PACIFIC Oil, REPORTER 



FORCED TO SHUT DOWN. 



The Car Shortage at Coalinga is 
Doing Much Harm, 
A correspondent to a Los An- 
geles paper writing from Coalinga 
says: 

A temporary paralysis has 
seized upon this oil field, and 
work has been or is being sus- 
pended by most of the oil com- 
panies. This is not that the mar- 
ket is not sufficiently absorbent of 
the high grade oil supplied by the 
Coalinga field, or that the prices 
ruling at present are too low, but 
wholly and solely because there 
is no means of marketing' the 
product. Heretofore thisfield has 
suffered with others in the state 
from an insufficient number of 
tank cars, the question of trans- 
portation having been here, as 
elsewhere, one of most variable 
quantity. Now, however, a crisis 
has apparently been reached, as 
on very many days no cars have 
been sent through at all. Today 
the train brought four cars to the 
loading station at Olga, and just 
as likely as not those will have to 
suffice for a day or two. 

Under circumstances such as 
these it is being regarded by the 
producers as more profitable to 
pose for the nonce as non-pro- 
ducers, with the result that the 
companies have shut down all 
along the line. Roughly approxi- 
mated the field can produce thirty 
carloads of oil per day, and this 
amount can readily be disposed 
of if' it only can be marketed. 

A solitary exception to the gen- 
eral shutting down is to be noted, 
however, in the California Oil 
Fields (Limited), and a limited 
amount of work in the western 
extension of the field — that com- 
pany having four strings of tools 
running; one on 19, two on 27, 
and one on 2f, 19-15. Oil City is 
almost deserted. Chanslor & Can- 
field keep the pump going all of 
the time on one well, and part of 
the time on another, and that is 
all. On the Home, and other ter- 
ritory closely adjacent, no drilling 
is being done whatever. Today 
the companies operating on sec- 
tion 28 followed the example set 
by other companies in the field 
and shut down on all work. This 
has been and is a most prolific 
section and is owned by the Han- 
ford Oil company, and other 
operating companies leasing from 



it. The Hanford has two wells on 
the pump, each running close to 
150 barrels a day. The " 28" com- 
pany has five good producing 
wells, the last one having been 
brought in about three weeks 
ago, and being the best of the lot. 
A test run was made a few days 
ago where it pumped 100 barrels 
in seven hours. The better half 
of the time the well flowed, the 
pump being used merely to stir it 
up. The Independence company 
has six wells, the Oil City Pe- 
troleum has five; the last one is 
now being finished and it is 
claimed to be a 200-barrel well. 
The Fauna has got just one pro- 
ducing well. Thus there are nine 
teen producing wells on this sec- 
tion, all of which were brought in 
at depths varying from 900 to 1,300 
feet. The sand is a blanket forma- 
tion and consequently the depth 
at which it would be struck could 
be definitely gauged, the differ- 
ence in the depth given above be- 
ing the greater depth to which 
the later wells have been carried 
into the oil sand. The oil pro- 
duced is twenty-four gravity. . 

On account of the flatness of the 
oil stratum the Hanford's territory 
has been lucky territory, and for 
exploitation on a closely systematic 
and elaborate scale the California 
Oil Fields (Limited) stands un- 
rivaled. It is an English corpo- 
ration and bought the territory 
formerly owned by the California 
Oil and Gas company, close to Oil 
City, closely approximating 4500 
acres. Last June the ground was 
bare; now there are five wells, 
producing, it is averred, 800 bar- 
rels of oil per day, and drilling 
operations being conducted on 
four others. In addition to this, 
however, the camp is a model of 
its kind. Everything is of the 
very best. The cottages for the 
superintendent and his assistant 
are cosy and perfectly appointed, 
the houses for the work people 
also are not of the make-shift order, 
but have such luxurious accesso- 
ries as might be indicated by por- 
celain tubs and hot and cold water. 
The spacious cookhouse and din- 
ing room are in charge of two 
cooks, natural gas is used for light- 
ing and heating, and a large com- 
modiousbarn gives ample accommo- 
dation for the horses, and a year's 
supply of baled hay. A well- 
equipped machine shop, with all 
the supplies likely to be necessary 



has prevented the delays that are 
frequent in drilling. A five-horse 
power gas engine drives the drill 
press, forge blowers, pipe-thread- 
ing machine, grindstone, emery 
wheels, etc. 

The buildings at the camp are 
painted a green color and form an 
oasis amid the barren hills, whose 
bareness is not relieved by the 
rough lumbered shacks that make 
up the ordinary driller's camps. 

The California Oil Fields com 
pany is pursuing its plan of ex 
ploitation upon a systematic plan. 
Each well is 160 feet from the sec 
tion line and 450 feet apart, 
and in this way when the sec- 
tion has been encompassed with 
wells the proof will be practically 
positive that the entire section is 
proven-up. In such event wells 
may be drilled with a reasonable 
certainty of obtaining good resul's. 
There are men, however, who say 
that this English syndicate has not 
had practical oil men at the head 
who do not maintain results equal 
to the vast expenditures, and that 
the work of exploitation is being 
carried along on an altogether too 
elaborate scale. On the other 
hand, it is but fair to bear in mind 
that the company has a vast terri- 
tory to develop, consisting of sec- 
tions 9, 10, 19,21, 27 and 29, town- 
ship 19, range 15, and section 13, 
township 19, range 14. In order 
to do this efficiently and at a 
minimum cost extensive and varied 
preparation is necessary. The 
ordinary company operating some- 
times suffers loss by having to 
practically shut down for a day or 
two until some piece of machinery 
can be obtained from the city to 
replace a broken part. In the 
meantime there is no suspension 
of operating expenses, and re- 
peated experiences of this and 
similar kind run a company's ex- 
penditures, for which absolntely 
no return is made, to a vast amount. 
The California Oil Fields (Limited) 
has provided against all this kind 
of thing, and no imaginable con- 
tingency can arise that cannot be 
provided for right in camp. So 
far there has not been a dry hole 
and to date it appears as if the 
methods of the corporation and of 
William Graham, the manager, are 
receiving: justification. 



A Week of Surprises, 

The week has been one of sur- 
prises for the operators in the 



older producing fields. They had 
for weeks been confidently expect- 
ing an advance in the price of the 
product, basing their hopes on the 
increasing strength of the statisti- 
cal situation and the unsatisfactory 
results attending drilling opera- 
tions, the new weils showing a 
small average production. When 
the last pipe line reports were 
made public oil was held for a rise, 
which was freely predicted, the 
only difference in the opinions of 
the operators being as to the ex- 
tent of the advance. When, in- 
stead, a decline was announced, 
following closely the receipt of the 
pipe line report, there was much 
disappointment among the opera- 
tors, and speculations as to the 
cause. Among the causes may be 
noted the large decrease in 
deliveries, though there are other 
influences having a bearing on the 
situation. The reports from the 
producing fields during the psst 
week have been of the same 
general character as have been 
received for some time — a pre- 
ponderance of small wells, many 
dry holes and few wells of large 
capacity. Gushers now seem out 
of question. — Oil, Paint and Drug 
Reporter. 

Petroleum Trade of Formosa. 
The British Consul stationed at 
Formosa has sent the following 
report on the petroleum trade of 
that Island: 

The imports of kerosene' oil dur- 
ing 1900 was more than double 
that of 1899, 85,864 pounds sterl- 
ing, as against 38,584 pounds 
sterling. 

American oil was imported to 
the extent of 1,918,035 gallons, 
and Russian oil to the extent of 
51,7,750 gallons. Of the latter 
amount 369,700 gallons were im- 
ported in bulk; 117,305 gallons of 
Japanese oil were also taken, giv- 
ing a total import of 1,918,035 
gallons, cf which, however, 55,400 
gallons were re-exported. No 
Langkat oil was imported during 
1900. 

The favorite brand was, as 
usual, the American " Comet," 
which always commands a better 
price than other illumiuating oils. 
The Shell Transport and Trad- 
ing company are erecting a tank 
at their installation at Tamsui 
capable of containing 440,000 gal- 
lons of oil, which will be imported 
in bulk from their own refinery at 
Kotei, North Borneo. 



Fishing Tools 



Fishing Tools 



A full line of fishing tools constantly on hand for rent. Casing speais, casing cutters, swedges, combination slip sockets, slip 
sockets, horn sockets, bull dog sockets, under-reamers, rope spears, rope grab, rope sockets, spuds, boot-jacks, fishing jars, subs, 
spiders or ring and wedge, tool wrenches, tool hooks, jar-knockers, elevators, and anything else pertaining to the oil business. 

Bishop Fishing Tool Company 

91 Fremont Street, San Francisco. 

Branches at McKit*rick and Sunset, 



PACIFIC OH. REPORTER 



OIL ON PUBLIC LANDS. 



Mcanurc to Protect Bona Hide Oil 
Prospectors 

A Washington letter published 
in the last issue of the Oil. Paint 
and Drug Reporter states that 
Senator Stewart, of Nevada, chair- 
man of the Senate Committee on 
Mines and Mining, has formulated 
a measure designed to provide a 
method for the taking up of oi' 
lands that will make it difficult, if 
not impossible, for parties other 
than bona 6de oil prospectors to 
enter oil lands on the public do- 
main, and it will also limit the 
amount of oil land which can be 
purchased from the government 
by a single individual or corpora- 
tion. 

In the closing days of the last 
session a series of hearings were 
held by Senator Stewart's com- 
mittee, at which it was developed 
tbat legitimate oil prospectors 
were frequently interfered with 
by parties who, for speculative] 
purposrs purely, took up large 
tracts of land by preliminary en- 
tries and then delayed further 
proceedings for months, and even 
years, until oil prospectors suc- 
ceeded in locating wells on the 
property, when an effort would be 
made to eject the prospectors on 
the basis of the title secured 
through the preliminary entry. 
It also appeared tbat many at- 
tempts had been made by owners 



called " forest lieu - 
sued in exchange for holdings of 
forest lands, to take up valuable 
oil tracts on the ground tbat such 
tracts were purely agricultural in 
character because the government 
records did not absolutely demon- 
strate the fact that oil had been 
found thereon in commercial quan- 
tities. 

After the hearings referred to 
Senator Stewart decided that he 
would report and urge the pas- 
sage of a measure calculated to 
remedy these evils, but the near 
approach of the end of the session 
deterred him from making the 
effort to pass a bill. He has now 
introduced a measure which he 
will urge, and which is as follows: 

" Be it enacted, etc., that no person 
shall locate a mitring claim whether the 
same be a lode or a placer claim, as agent 
or attorney for any other person, asso- 
ciation or corpoiation. On all locations 
hereafter made in compliance with sec- 
tion 2.320 of the Revised Statutes of the 
United States, the auuual labor for de- 
development required by law shall be 
performed within one year from the date 
of location, and in every year there- 
after. On claims which are located 
prior to the passage of this act, in com- 
pliance with the provisions of said sec- 
lion, the auuual labor for development 
wort required by law shall be performed 
before the first day of October 1002. 
And thereafter the annual development 
work on such claims shall be performed 
prior to the first day of October in each 
year. 

" Sec. 2. That any citizen of the 
United States may, in the manner here- 
inafter set forth, purchase from the 









duahle quantities, but 
upon which nu petroleum ci 
have rrrd, at $ : 

Wlici 

contain such valuable quant 
any such person may make und file his 
written application with the register and 
a uf the Doited si.ru Land • 

for tile district in winch s«ul lands are 
located, to purchase tin I lie oil 

believed to be therein, which ipplii 
shall definite]]! describe the lands de- 
sired to be purchased, and such | 
shall at the time of making and filing 
such application make nnd file therewith 
his affidavit stating that he has pi 
<"ll\ caiefnily examined the lands ap- 
plied lor, and front such examination he 
believes, the mdh to be cbiefiv valuable 
for petroleum Of other oils; tbat be de- 
sires to purchase the same on account of 
the oil believed by him to lie contained 
therein, and that he docs not own, and 
lias not within one year past owned, anv 
lands acquired by him from the 1 
stales believed by him to contain such 
oils in the county in which the lands ap- 
plied for are located, which together 
therewith, will exceed t6o acres in all; 
and said affidavit shall be part of said 
application. Such application and affi- 
davit shall operate to reserve the land 
covered thereby for six months from 
the filing thereof, during which time 
the applicant shall have the preference 
right, as against all others, of purchas- 
ing such property, but upon bis failure 
to pay therefor during such six mouths 
all of his rights in the premises shall 
cease and he shall not have the right to 
purchase such property thereafter un- 
der any subsequent application. Appli- 
cations to purchase hereunder shall con- 
form to legal subdivisions, but the length 
of the claim shall not be more than 



■1 de- 

quirei 
and 

the I 

per and lead tli.it untitled ill 

■ tied In the tnit. 

This measure' lus been referred 
to Seuator Stewart's committee, 
and it is probable that a hearing 
will be given upon it before it is 
repotted, but tbe senator hopes to 
be able to get it into the senate 
after the holula\ I 

Railroad or Pipe Line. 

There appears to be a division 
of sentiment at Sunset on two 
very important enterprises. One 
is a pipe-line scheme and tbe 
other has for its object the ex- 
tension of the railroad from its 
present terminus to a point con- 
siderably to the northwest. Those 
interested in the pipe-line project 
are very sanguine of success, and 
report that work on the enter- 
prise will actually be in progress 
shortly after the first of the year. 
The promoters of the other enter- 
prise have not received definite 
assurance from the railroad folks 
that their petition will be granted, 
but there are many things that 
lead them to believe tbat the 
proposition is looked upon with 
favor. 



***?<*>/****^ASV>***SSilS^/>*t^ 



Choice Oil Land for Sale 

We have been authorized to sell three pieces of land in Section 13, Township 29, Range 28, in that portion of the 

Kern River Oil district known as 

SOUTH OF KERN RIVER 

It is all patented land and the title is guaranteed. 

The Chicago Extension is now drilling on the land adjoining, with every prospect of striking oil. 

The Wizard Oil Company is drilling southwest of us. 

The Panorama had 150 feet of oil sand on Section 14, adjoining us, but lost the well. 

The land is only a mile south of Discovery well, where oil was first struck in the Kern River District. 

There is no doubt but that with a proper rig for drilling in the soft formations oil will be struck here at about 1500 feet. 

We will sell this land in a body, or will split it up into three pieces. 

We are able to offer it for a short time only at 

$60 PER ACRE 

This is over 50 per cent lower than any land is offered in this portion of the district. 



EASY TERMS 



EASY TERMS 



For maps and further information apply to 

THE PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



^yVyyy^VVVV^VVVVVVV V VV^VVVVW^VVVSW 




id 



PACIFIC Oil, REPORTER 



\ 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments in Oil in Various Parts 
of the State. 



COLUSA. 
Smith & Gorrill received a "clutch" 
this week to be used in catching the lost 
bit, and it is to be earnestly hoped that 
they will speedily be able to resume 
drilling. 

The Williams Farmer says the Minor 
people have lost their tools in the hole; 
that work is proceeding day and night 
on the Gibson lease, with the hole nearly 
500 feet deep; the Colusa County Oil 
Company's hole is down 1200 feet, with 
excellent prospects; the Williams Oil 
Company has succeeded in gettiug the 
broken pieces of casing out of the hole. 
It is hoped the second effort to case off 
the water will be successful, 

FRESNO. 
"Maine State No. 4 will start to drilling 
next week. 

The Esperanza Oil Company will re- 
sume operations between January 1st 
and loth. 

An oil company will be formed in 
Oakland by parties of that city shortly 
for the purpose of bcring for oil on 2, 
20-14. 

Zenith No. 1 is progressing nicely. 
This hole is probably unequalled in the 
state, as it takes 12-inch drive pipe to a 
depth of 1200 feet. 

The Maine State Oil Company is put- 
ting up a pump with which to force the 
oil from the wells to o ia during cold 
weatherwhen the oil does not run readily. 

Fresno-San Francisco No. 1 is over 600 
feet deep with light showing of oil and 
good prospects. This well is within a 
stone's throw of the Mercantile Com- 
pany's No, 2, which is a very good well. 

Investment No. 2 is drilling. Several 
little hitches have occurred to retard 
drilling since this well started spudding 
last week, but everything is running 
smoothly now. 

The Rhode Island and California Oil 
Company 4 recently * incorporated under 
the laws of Maine, has bought from A. 
Barieau6, 20-16, Coalinga, for $130,000. 
Mr. Barieau is a well-known oil expert 
and is usually successful in his selec- 
tions. 

The Mount Jack Oil Company has re- 
moved its old drilling rig and erected a 
new one in the vicinity of the Sauer 
Dough Wells. The Ibex has also just 
completed a new rig, but these rigs were 
built for assessment work. — Coalinga 
Derrick. 

KERN. 

Junction No. 5 is drilling. Good pro- 
gress is being made. 

Chanslor-Canfield's two wells on 8 are 
both in the sand. 

The Bankers and Brokers on 23 are 
down 1000 feet with a good showing. 

The Chicago Extension is pulling its 
casing from the hole on the South Side. 

The Bay City is pumping its well, but 
is doing no development work at present. 

Vesta has the rig for its fifth well up. 
The drill in No. 4 is at a depth of 560 
feet. 

The Stratton well on section 32, 32-24, 
is still doing well as a producer. It is an 
excellent well. 

The Casa, on 15, has closed down for a 
short time. The company has au excel- 
lent showing. 

The Oregon Midway, on section 8, is 



pumping oil for its own use and is sup- 
plying neighboring rigs. 

Green & Whittier, who recently began 
drilling on section 30, lowered the casing 
about 250 feet and ceased operations. 

The Mecca, on section 19, 28-28, is 
down 630 feet with its first well in that 
portion of the field. 

Monte Cristo has perforated the casing 
of a new producer. The company has 
three strings of tools working on its prop- 
erty. 

Red Bank has spudded in on well No- 
lo. Out of the company's nine produc- 
ing wells only two or three are on the 
pump. 

The Potamac has finished another well, 
No. 28, at a depth of 880 feet, the deepest 
yet drilled on their land, and the drill 
was still in oil sand at that depth. 

Sunset Center is moving its rig from 
the hole completed into a water well some 
time ago and will soon begin drilling an- 
other hole in search of oil. 

The Burks Oil Company will commence 
drilling on 12 of section 22 within the 
next week. The hole will be 300 yards 
north of the Bay City well. 

The Nevada County is installing a new 
70 horse-power engine on its holdings in 
the local oil field. The company's full 
quota of wells will be pumped by it. 

"The Wichita Oil Company has suc- 
ceeded in getting the tools from its hole 
in the Sunset district and has again re- 
sumed work in forcing the casing down. 

The first string of casing will belowered 
in the Acme well, on section 34, 12-24, at 
an early date. The drill is now working 
near the 400 foot level and is making 
rapid progress. 

The Washington rig, on section 1, 
11-24, is being torn down and will be re- 
moved to the holdings of the Sedalia- 
California on 18, 11-23, where a hole will 
be drilled as soon as possible. 

The Mascot, on 26, is in the oil sand 
with No. 1. No. 2 has been completed 
and is being pumped. The company i s 
also bntlding No. 3, and No. 4 will be 
started by the first of the year. 

Some difficulty is being experienced 
in sinking the Irma well in the local 
field. The casing is stuck near the 900 
foot level. It is thought the company 
will have to reduce to the 7-inch drive. 

A deed from Jewett & Blodgett con- 
veying to the Sedalia and California Oil 
Company title to the north half of the 
north west quarter of the southwest quar- 
ter of section 18, 11-23 has been placed 
on record. 

John Johnson Jr., who with others is 
interested in a project to pool the prod- 
uct of the local fields, returned this 
week from Los Angeles to Bakersfield. 
He reports that he is meeting with much 
encouragement from the producers. 

The Chicago Extension, on section 24, 
29-28, is now down nearly 1100 feet, but 
has not yet found the oil formation. The 
Wizard, another operator on the south 
side, is below the 1300 foot level and is 
prepared to go down a few hundred feet 
deeper. 

The Sanborn Oil Company has re- 
cently purchased the entire drilling out- 
fit of the Gibbs company near Coalinga. 
The material is now being moved to the 
company's holdings in the Devil's Den 
district, where work will begin as soon as 
it is put in place. 



The operators of the Sunset field have 
been assured that work on the pipe line, 
which has been talked of for some time, 
will be begun early in the new year and 
will be completed within sixty days 
thereafter. It is said that the pipe is 
now on the road to the district. 

Alma Jr. No. 3 is flowing quite a heavy 
stream of oil. The well was completed a 
few weeks ago and soon after showed a 
tendency to spout. The sand pump was 
lowered into the hole for the purpose of 
agitating it and soon after it began flow- 
ing a good stream. 

The Peoples' Union Oil company, a 
Chicago concern, has absorbed the Great 
Eastern and is preparing to begin opera- 
tions at once in 10, 27-27. This land is 
between the Commonwealth and the 
New Hope on Poso creek, and the new 
company is preparing to go 15CO feet 
or deeper in testing the territory. A 
first-class rig is being put up. 

The Occidental Water Company has 
placed several loads of water pipe in vari- 
ous parts of the Sunset District, and it is 
said will soon begin laying laterals in all 
directions from the mains. The com- 
pany is meeting with considerable oppo- 
sition from various sources which may 
retard it to some extent in completing 
the plans now laid. 

Owing to the heavy gas pressure iD 
Maricopa's well No. 2 work has been 
suspended for the time being in hopes 
the pressure will be reduced by being 
allowed to flow for a few weeks. The 
9 5-8 casing was lowered to the rich oil 
strata which was encountered near the 
740-foot level. The well is now produc- 
ing large quantities of oil. 

The Mercedes is busily engaged in- 
stalling an air plant at its camp on section 
5, 29-28 and henceforth will land the oil 
on the surface by this method. Several 
of these same plants have already been 
placed in the river field and after a trial 
of several months have been pronounced 
a decided success. The Mercedes has 
four completed wells and the plant now 
being placed in position is of such 
capacity as to handle the product of the 
four producers. 

The Imperial company on section 33, 
28-28, is pumping wells 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, II, 
12. Wells numbered i, 7, 8, 9, 10, which 
have been completed, have not been on 
the pump for some time, The rigs and 
derricks for Nos. 13 and 15 are ready to 
begin punching a hole though it is not 
likely the company will sink another 
well before spring. The Thirty-three on 
the same section is pumping Nos. 12, 14, 
16 and 17 of its nineteen completed wells. 
The rigs for 18, 19, 24, 25, 26 and 27 have 
been placed in position. This company 
has no wells drilling. 

Very few of the wells at McKittrick 
are now being pumped for the reason 
that the tankage of the field is brim full 
and not a little of the oil is flowing to 
waste. The Giant and Kern River wells 
are still flowing a very large volume and 
occasionally indulge in such perfor- 
mances as breaking loose and throwing 
a heavy stream of oil above the derrick. 
The shipments from the field average 
about ten or twelve cars a day. It is esti- 
mated that three or four times that num- 
ber would be sent out were cars available. 

LOS ANGEI.ES. 

No. 2 of the East Whittier Oil Com- 
pany is down 1600 feet, with T$/% casing, 
and good progress is being made with 
the hole. 

Contractor Richard McConnell has the 
two holes, Nos. 31 and 33, which he is 
drilling for the Central Oil Company, 
down 1600 feet. 

The North Whittier Oil Company has 
bad its new well, No. 2, on the pump for 
a number of days and is now preparing 
to deepen No. 1. 

The Whittier Crude Oil Company will 



put its new well, No. 5, on the pump 
today and will begin spudding on No. 6 
the first of the week. 

The Home Oil Company's No. 10 is 
now pumping a fine stream of oil, but 
there is s large head to be reduced before 
any estimate can be made on the capa- 
city of the well. Good progress is being 
made on Nos. 13 and 14. 

The Whittier-Fillmore Company has 
made 1200 feet of hole on the well being 
drilled on the Tubbs-Evans tract. Dur- 
ing the past few weeks there has been 
considerable hard under-reaming and 
progress has been slow. 

On the Whittier Oil and Development 
Company's well progress has been slow 
during the past few weeks. A number 
o( hard shells had to be drilled through, 
but at present the tools are working in 
adobe, with streaks of oil showing up 
frequently. — Whittier News. 

SAN BENITO. 
A. J, Chaney and son John are com- 
pleting the hauling of material to the 
Merrill ranch for the San Benito Crude 
Oil Company, where that company will 
soon begin drilling. 

SAN LUIS OBISPO. 
Theltimber for building the oil tanks 
at the Sperry flour mill at San Luis 
Obispo has arrived, and one tank has 
been set up ready to sink into the pit 
that has been dug out. 

SAN MATEO. 
The Pilarcitos Oil Company is awaiting 
the perfection of its incorporation to be- 
gin immediate work. 

Operations on the Fountain Oil Com- 
pany's property are still suspended, but 
will soon be resumed. 

Messrs. Sallee, Hayne and Guiberson 
are making fine progress with their new 
well on the Taylor place, and in the 
meantime are pumping two other wells 
with good results. 

Messrs. Frick and Parker of the High 
Proof Oil Company, operating on the 
Holtje place, are more than pleased with 
their last well, which is turning out bet- 
ter than they expected. Mr. Frick told 
the writer yesterday that it would beat 
ten barrels per day. He says he has six 
hundred barrels of oil in sight and has 
already accepted an order for two car 
loads to be delivered at San Mateo as 
soon as the roads will permit and they 
can secure tank-wagons. 

SANTA CLARA. 
The Gilroy Oil Company is arranging 
to use oil for fuel. A big storage tank 
has been ordered end the engine boiler 
is now being fiated up so as to use the 
new fuel. 

TEHAMA. 

President Francis Houghton of the 
Corning Oil and Gas Company speaks 
very encouragingly of the prospects for 
the resumption of drilling at the com- 
pany's well. He feels confident that 
boring will be begun about January 1st. 



w. A. KIDD 



M. H. MURRAY 



MURRAMIDD 
DRILLING CO. 

Contract to Drill Oil and Water Wells 

and Build Rigs and Pumping Plants 



Furnish Estimates on Everything 
Used Around Oil Wells 



EXPERIENCED MEN TO 
OPERATE FISHING TOOLS 

FglSJtS?"" Hole1, Bakersfield, Cal. 



P. O. Box 369, SANTA CRUZ, CAL. 



s 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

COM MINlM.UiiN 'I PAY. rapidity and before the depart- j BANKERS AND BROKERS. 



it 



Prediction of Chief Engineer of 
Northern Railway of France. 

M. Sartiaux. chief engineer of 
the Northern Railway of France, 
offers the prediction that "in ten 
years, between petroleum and al- 
cohol, coal mining \<on't pay." 
Commenting on this the New 
York World says: "This predic- 
tion may be a trifle too optimistic, 
but there is a world-wide tendency 
among scientists and inventors to 
turn to liquid fuel. Europe, for 
instance, is keenly interested in 
our Texan oil. Why use coal, 
which is cumbrous, hard to handle, 
full of waste and rapidly growing 
dearer, when there is fuel which 
can be piped to market or to the 
seaboard and turned on at a tap 
like water? Much attention is 
now paid to alcohol as a fuel that 
can be made anywhere, that burns 
without smoke, and is cheap to 
transport because highly concen- 
trated. Emperor William of Ger- 
many is urging the culture of 
potatoes for making fuel alcohol. 
An exhibition in Paris last week 
of appliances for burning it in- 
dustrially attracted visitors from 
all Europe, and practicable al- 
cohol engines up to twenty-five 
horse-power were shown. In our 
own state the Cornell University 
School of Forestry is making cheap 
alcohol from the hard timber left 
uncut by Adirondack lumbermen 
because it would not float down 
to their sawmills. Alcohol can be 
made from fruits, grains, vege- 
tables, from straw. M. Sartiaux 
gives its lowest cost of production 
at fifteen cents a gallon, equiva- 
lent to seven and one half cents a 
gallon for petroleum which has 
but half its fuel value. At this 
rate the new fuel is cheaper than 
kerosene in Paris, and should be 
here when its manufacture is per- 
fected." 



ment cou'd reach the scene the 
whole structure was a ma- 
flames. Box cars standing on a 
siding near the burning building 
were removed before catching fire. 



Petroleum Center Resumes. 
Prom Bakersfield comes the re- 
port that Petroleum Center again 
is active with development work 
on section 24, 28-17. This com- 
pany now has two wells. The 
third, drilled to a good depth a 
few months ago, has the prospects 
of being equally as good. The 
well will be completed as soon as 
possible, and it is thought other 
wells will be begun upon its com- 
pletion. The Petroleum Center is 
the only company on 24 which is 
doing new work, and reported the 
only active company, barring the 
Minnehaha and Mecca, in the ex- 
treme northwest part of the Kern 
River field. 



Kern Refinery Burned. 

The refinery owned and oper- 
ated by Milton McWhorter in 
Kern City, was completely de- 
stroyed by fire last Thursday 
evening. The loss is estimated at 
$5,000, on which there is said to be 
no insurance 

The fire is supposed to have 
been of incendiary origin. It 
broke out about 8 o'clock and in 
the short space of half an hour the 
building and its inflammable con- 
tents were completely destroyed. 

The six stills which are situated 
just outside of the refinery build- 
ing are a complete wreck, as well 
as is all the machinery in the 
building. There were probably 
2000 barrels of lubricating oil, 
stove distillate, kerosene and 
asphaltum destroyed. Some of the 
crude oil, which is situated east of 
the building in a large tank, was 
saved from the flames by the 
heroic work of the firemen. 

The fire started in the kerosene 
room and spread with lightning 



Fuel Oil in New York. 

In New York the Standard Oil 
company has been experimenting 
for several months on their tug 
No. 4 with an oil-burning boiler. 
The idea being to replace coal with 
oil as fuel. A trial trip has been 
made that proved successful. One 
of the principal features of the oil- 
burner is that steam is obtained 
quicker, the heat produced is more 
intense and the oil burns with a 
perfectly white flame. The en- 
gines are built on a new plan. 
Nine jets are ranged in the firebox 
and the oil is forced in by air 
pressure pumps. It is calculated 
that four barrels of oil are equiva- 
lent to one ton of coal. The cost 
of a barrel of oil is ;oc, while coal 
by the ton costs the oil company 
$3.25. The boat was given a 
severe test. No trouble was had 
in towing the same sort of a load 
as a boat fired with coal. The 
boat was run up and down North 
river with some officials on board, 
and the scheme was pronounced a 
success. It is said that it will be 
given a further test, and if found 
continuously satisfactory, all the 
company's tugs will be similarly 
equipped. 



Patents Relating to Oil and Gas. 

The following patents were 
granted during the past month 
relating to gas and oil: 

Well bailer, William Plotts, 
Whittier, Cal.; No. 686,951. 

Oil pump, Clark F. Rigby, New 
Martinsville, W. Va.; No. 687,067. 

Wire cable clamp, G. F. Bell, 
Sistersville, W. Va.; No. 687,293. 

Reaming tool, J. S. Brown, Eos 
Angeles, Cal.; No. 687,296. 

Well drilling machine, George 
Zink, Shady Bower, Md.; No. 688,- 
220. 

Pil pump, J. C Snyder, Bowling 
Green, Ohio; No. 688,445 

Apparatus for pulling tubes out 
of bored holes, Victor Petit, Stryj, 
Austria-Hungary; No. 688,543. 



\ .nmponv Thai Meruit. Itn- 
and la Doing Rapid Work. 

The Bankers & Brokers Oil 
company on section 2\. township 
32 south, range 23 east, Sunset 
Midway distlict, stalled drilling 
November 22nd on their well 
which was down 564 feet with 
eleven and five eighths casing, 
they drilled night and day until a 
depth of 850 feet was reached, the 
hole caved some and caught the 
tools which took nine days to get 
them out, then drilling was con- 
tinued rapidly to get oil as soon 
as possible; the hole was down on 
December 22nd about 1 100 feet, 
with 1,065 f eet of nine and live- 
eighths casing swinging loose in 
the hole, which speaks well of 
Mr. J. J. Meachem, the head driller 
who has charge of the work. 
After passing through the gas belt 
at 575 foot depth, the drill entered 
the blue clay and has been in 
clay for the entire distance to the 
present depth; the formation is 
changing and getting soft, which 
is a very good indication that a 
large body of oil is near at hand, 
and the company will soon have 
the pleasure of announcing to the 
public and its stockholders that 
they have one of the best wells in 
Kern county. Arrangements are 
made to start drilling No. 2, when 
No. 1 is completed. 

This is one of the successful 
companies operating in California, 
that deserves great credit and the 
purchase of Bankers & Brokers 
Oil company's stock is heartily 
recommended for a safe money 
making investment. J. W. Heis- 
ner, the manager, is a bright, ener- 
getic man, who is using his best 
efforts to make a success of his 
proposition and will do it if any 
man can. It is safe to say that 
any enterprise left under bis man- 
agement, will be handled with 
great economy and produce satis- 
factory results, and investors are 
safe when investing in his com- 
pany. 

Left a Fund. 

The Swedish oil millionaire, 
Nobel, who made his money in 
Caspian oil region, and by build- 
ing a huge refinery business on 
his own account left a fund of 
$9,000,000, to provide five yearly 
prizes of $55,000 each to be com- 
peted for by discoverers in chem- 
istry and other arts and sciences. 
Professor Monroe, of the Colum- 
bian University at Washington, 
has just been appointed by the 
Royal Academy of Science at 
Stockholm to nominate American 
inventors and discoverers in 
chemistry who desire to compete 
for one of these five yearly prizes. 
— Oil, Paint & Drug Reporter. 



Producer*' Oil Exchange 

The folkmiPB .• 
the 1' (change in the 

formal sessions held tor the week ending 

BEAR PI 

at 01 47 00 

CALIFORNIA STANDARD. 



I4<M lit 
100 nt 
1900 ut 



400 at 
400 nt 



500 at 









POUR OIL. 



•IQ. 
48 



GIANT. 

26 

HOMB OIL. 



304 00 



196 00 
192 00 



130 00 



335 00 
33o 00 

IC20 OO 

975 00 



100 at 3 35 

.1 3<< 

■I 3 .1" 

300 at 3 25 

HANFORD, 

13 at 90 00 1 170 00 

n> at ^2 <hi 1472 00 

Io( B90) at 93 00 930 00 

5 at 91 00 455 00 

I (S9o)at 90 00 .,u 00 

TUNCTION. 

500 at 24 120 00 

1000 (Sgo)at 24 240 00 

1000 at 25 250 00 

LION. 

100 at 07 7 00 

1900 at 08 152 00 

MONARCH OF ARIZONA. 

500 at 19 95 00 

OCCIDENTAL OF W. VA. 

200 at 25 50 00 

300 at 24 72 00 

OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 

252 00 



1200 at 21 

PEERLESS. 

20 at 5 00 100 00 

ioo(B9o)at 5 25 52500 

PETROLEUM CENTER. 

2980 at 03 89 40 

REED CRUDE. 

300 at 34 102 00 

1000 at 35 350 00 

SAN JOAQUIN O. & D. 

10 at 6 50 65 00 

10 at 6 37 "^ 63 75 

10 at 6 25 62 50 

SUPERIOR. 
100 at 08 



THIRTY-THREE. 

20 at 7 25 

30 at 7 00 

25 at 6 8TA 

25 at 6 75 



8 00 



145 00 

210 00 

171 87^ 

168 75 



Shares 21,575 Amount $1 1,201 27 J£ 



Of Course It Was. 

They have sat in debate 
For weeks more than eight 

To find who hit the Spanish fleet's eye. 
Why, there isn't a man 
From Bersheba to Dan 

But who knows it was Admiral Schley. 

—Ex. 



Health or Riches. 

John Rockefeller, the oil king, 
is said to be a physical wreck. 
He is so loaded down with wealth 
that he don't know what to do with 
it and he can't back the responsi- 
bility. Poor old man! He is now 
looking into the very same hole in 
the ground that all paupers look 
into. What is riches when we 
reach the jumping off place after 
all!— Ex. 



The California-Utah. 

The California-Utah Company's 
well 8 miles southwest of Green 
River station, Utah, is going down 
rapidly. The plant worked nicely 
from the start and 40 feet of depth 
was acquired in the first half 
day's work. 



Annual Meeting. 

Notice is hereby given that the annual meeting 
of the Commonwealth Oil company will be held 
in the office of the company, 710 Market street, 
San Francisco, Cal., on Tuesday, January 7, 1902, 
at 2 o'clock p. M , for the purpo-e of electing a 
Boaidof Directors to serve for the ensuing year, 
and the transaction of such ther business as 
may prop«rly come before the meeting. The 
books of the compaDy will be closed on Satur- 
day, January 4, 1902. 

Charles Conklin, Secretary. 

San Francisco, December 26, 1901. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



CAUSE OF THE DROP. 



An Eastern Paper Explains the 
Recent Fall in Prices. 
With a drop of ten cents a bar- 
rel on crude and thirty points a 
a gallon in refined oil, it is very 
evident that something is in the 
wind- The condition of supply 
and demand the past month would 
not seem to warrant such a 
decisive and sudden cut in prices. 
The pipe line reports shewed a 
reduction of over 20,000 barrels a 
day in the net stocks and the ship- 
ments were about the same amount 
in excess of the runs. The field 
report, too, for December was ex- 
ceedingly bullish and the demand 
for refined oil during the first 
week of the present month show ed 
no signs of an immediate decline. 
The cause of the break must be 
sought in the foreign situation. 
The Russian oil industry has b^en 
in a demoralized condition for 
several months past, and heavy 
stocks of refined oil have been 
accumulating. Large quantities of 
this surplus are evidently finding 
a market in Europe and coming in 
direct competition with American 
refined. Germany has been en- 
couraging the consumption of 
Russian oil in every way by dis- 
criminating against the American 
article. Russian refined is a by- 
product and has been selling 
delivered at Batoumforthe equiva- 
lent of one and a half cents for an 
American gallon. The greatest 
drawback the Russian industry 
has had to contend with has been 
the lack of transportation facilities. 
These, in a great measure, have 
been improved. Russia of late has 
made numerous extensions to her 
pipe line system, and the govern- 
ment has established several new 
railroad routes by which oil can be 
shipped to the Volga river and 
thence transported across the 
country in tank cars to Germany 
and other parts of Europe. It is 
plain that the necessity for getting 
rid of the enormous surplus of 
refined and the improved facilities 
for reaching the European markets 
have resulted in some extraordinary 
concessions in regard to prices, 
and are behind the recent drop in 
American oil. 

Then again the possibilities of 
the Texas oil field have exercised 
a sort of reflex action upon the 
Russian petroleum trade, which in 
turn has affected the price of our 
home product; English capitalists 
are taking a great deal of interest 
in the Beaumont oil field and the 
Guffey Petroleum company has 
made arrangements with the Shell 
Transportation and Trading com- 
pany, an English concern, to ship 
large quantities of fuel oil to 
Europe. Russia's principle pro- 
duction is fuel oil, and every bar- 
rel of astatki displaced by a barrel 
of Texas oil means so much more 
of the Russian oil to be manu- 
factured into refined. Texas is 
thus bound to exercise an influence 
upon prices that has not hitherto 



been foreseen. Then the Guffey 
company is enlarging its refinery 
at Port Arthur for the purpose of 
preparing the Beaumont oil for 
foreign shipment. It is not at all 
likely that it intends to waste the 
lighter products of the Texas oil 
that are given off in this process. 
A small quantity of illuminating 
oil of inferior grade will undoubt- 
edly be obtained from them. That 
this has already had an effect upon 
the price of oil in the southwest is 
shown by the fact that the price 
,of Corsicana light oil was reduced 
ten cents a barrel the latter part of 
November. This cut seemed to 
bave been a preliminary pointer 
for the present decline ip Penn- 
sylvania oils. Of course, a matter 
of shipping 8,000 barrels of oil 
from the Texas fields could not 
have exercised a very depressing- 
influence as yet, but the wonder- 
ful tales that have been sent 
abroad in regard to the capacity 
of Texas gushers have excited the 
attention of oil dealers and con- 
sumers all over the world. It is 
not the unexpected so much that 
has happened this time. The 
wonder is that it did not happen 
sooner. — Oil City Derrick. 



IT WILL PAY YOU 

to write to P. O. Box 117, Visalia 
Cal., before you buy OIL STOCK, 
lease or buy OIL LANDS or Oi 
Casing. 



M. GROSSMAYER, 

CONTRACTOR FOR 

Drilling Oil Wells 

Box 213, 
Bakersfield, Cal. 

Room 17, 
1921 Chester Ave. 



Oil Fuel in Mines. 

As a matter of increased econ- 
omy in mine management and 
added demand for crude oil, the 
rapid extension of the use of pe- 
troleum in operating the machin- 
ery of Arizona mines is attracting 
the attention of those interested 
in these industries. The great 
United Verde and the Dominion — 
two of the largest copper pro- 
duers — are now preparing to use 
fuel oil. In the case of the for- 
mer, the case is especially signifi- 
cant for the reason that the coal 
now used is mined in W. A. 
Clark's own mines at Galley, New 
Mexico. It is estimated that the 
United Verde's freight charges on 
coal and coke alone amount to 
nearly $50,000 per month. 

There is no doubt that oil from 
Bakersfield or Texas can be used 
in Arizona mining with a direct 
saving to the consumers. Indi- 
rectly there is a further saving in 
the labor required to operate the 
furnaces during the intense heat 
of the Arizona summer, owing to 
the automatic feed employed in 
burning oil. 

The well-known Congress mine 
now uses oil in its roasting fur- 
naces and mill. The test, after a 
considerable period, is reported as 
giving very satisfactory results. — 
Bonds and Mortgages. 




AMERICAN; 

STEEL AND WIRE CM'PY 



Pacific Works 

The only Wire Rope Factory on 
the Pacific Coast. 



We make 

Wire Ropes, Cable and Hawsers 

For all purposes and with 
every possible combination 
of Wires, steel and iron, 
galvanized or plain. 



An Immense Tank Steamer 

The new British steamship Kins- 
man, the largest oil carrier in the 
world, was recently at Philadel- 
phia to load 2,100,000 gallons of 
petroleum in bulk for European 
account. The next largest vessel 
of the bulk-carrying type now 
afloat carries less than 2,000,000 
gallons, which shows the import- 
ance of a vessel of the Kinsman's 
type. 



M. Grossmayer's Drilling Outfit. 



Pacific Coast Underwriting Company. 

Incorporate companies; furnish 
everything complete. 

Sell interest-bearing Gold Bonds. 

Underwrite stocks. 

Buy and sell Oil Lands. 

Handle all kinds of mining 
properties. 

Information furnished investors 
regarding Pacific Coast Corpora- 
tions. Address, 

Main Office, 507-8-9 Parrott Bldg., 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Wire Ropes 
Of all Kinds 
For Oil Well 
Purposes 

And all fixtures and appliances 
for the use of Wire Rope 



Send your orders to 

American Steel&Wire Co. 

LOS ANGELES— No. 206 North 

Los Angeles St. 
SAN FRANCISCO— No. 8 & 10 

Pine St. 



♦ 

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n 
n 
n 
□ 

D 

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n 
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n 
n 
♦ 
□ 

□ 
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BUY OR SELL 
CALIFORNIA 

OIL STOCKS 



, THROUGH 



JOSEPH B.TOPLITZ 

Member Producers' Oil Exchange. 
Member California Petroleum Miners' Association. 

330 Pine Street, San Francisco, Gal. 

Orders for Buying and Selling California Oil Stocks 
Promptly Attended to. 

Reliable information on Oil Stocks Furnished Gratis. 

Unlisted Stocks a specialty. 

Correspondence Solicited. 

Reference — California Safe Deposit & Trust Co., 

San Francisco, Cal. 






For Sale Cheap 

1 5,(100 (or less) Shares Standard Con. 0. & L.Co. 

Any Reasonable Offer Will Be Accepted 



" 1 g 



1 1 



to 

to 

to 



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to >f\ 55 

f jamesr.t.mershon| I 

to in 8§ 

I I I 1 

1 I Stock Broker I | 

i •'• ?5 i 

§2 to 537=538=539 PARROTT BUILDING $ S 

S? ¥ SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 2 rft 

PJ to W £s 

83 to $ 83 

§2 to « & 



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S3 M- Authentic information furnished regarding corporations operating in the State of California ;« M 

re * ?5 i 

Sfl W I have trustworthy data always available. ;L ra 

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(vS \?l Correspondence welcomed. ;ii M 

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a to in p| 

fvfl 'ivT- ■ ■^■^ •s-s-} 'S'a.-a'S'S'S'S'g-s-S'a'^ i S--S'S'S-3-a , S'a-S'S'S'S'S'3 S'S'^c^rH-' Ki 

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'4 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



SENATOR BARD 



Oil Has Mode Him a Man of Great 
Wealth. 

One of the first oil wells in the 
state was drilled in 1865 by the 
present United States Senator, 
Thomas Bard, a young man then, 
a protege of old Tom Scott, the 
Pennsylvania Railroad "baron." 
Mr. Bard was a clerk at $30 per 
month, working at a railroad 
station on the Pennsylvania Rail 
way. Scott and a few others got 
interested about that time in the 
immortal Professor "Silliman's re- 
port" on oil and sent his favorite 
clerk out here to promote an oil 
company. Young Bard, twenty- 
four years old, organized a com 
pany controlling at least 10,000 
acres of supposed oil land. He 
kept an eye to windward and took 
a flyer in oil lands himself, floated 
a rival company, is now a great 
man, and has made a million or 
two in oil, an exchange says. The 
most profitable oil company now 
in California is the Union, JS 10,000,- 
000 capitalization, with oi'er 109,- 
000, acres of oil land in Ventura 
county, California. They have 
drilled more than 300 wells and 
recently declared a dividend of 
$1.45 a share. The Union has 
already paid out more than $9,000,- 
000 in dividends since 1890. 



THE OIL CAR SHORTAGE. 



A Land Office Case. 

The two cases of the Kern Oil 
Company against J. Rene Clotfel- 
ter, involving two forest lieu land 
selections covering lands in sec- 
tions 24 and 32 in 28-28, in the 
Kern River oil district, will come 
up for hearing before the Register 
and Receiver of the U. S. Land 
Office on January 21, 1902. The 
oil company claims that it was in 
possession of the oil land at the 
date Clotfelter filed his lieu selec- 
tion. These cases will be inter- 
esting and will in all probability 
occupy the attention of the land 
officials for several days when they 
come to trial. — Visalia Times. 



What President Ripley, oi the 
Santa Fe, Says About It. 

In an interview last week at 
Beaumont, President Ripley had 
this to say about tank car shortage: 

"The Santa Fe got into the busi- 
ness as early as possible, and early 
in March began placing orders for 
new equipment," said he. "The 
deliveries from the car manufac- 
turer were as prompt as could be 
expected, and in September we 
received our first consignment of 
new equipment. Five hundred of 
the new oil cars have been con- 
signed to this territory, that is, the 
Gulf, Colorado and Santa Fe di- 
vision of the system, and by the 
first of February all of these 500 
cars will be in use. They are 
8200 gallon capacity, about double 
the capacity of the old cais in use, 
and will be equivalent to 1000 of 
the old style tank cars. It is no 
trouble to get all the cars we want 
— that is, the cars without the 
tanks — but the making of the 
metal tanks is what keeps the 
work back. The first lot of 100 
tank cars was 45 days late in 
delivery, and this was of course 
the fault of the builder. But the 
oil consumers are not prepared to 
take the oil as offered and should 
provide ample storage capacity so 
that cars could be delivered 
promptly and released. Do you 
know of any large steam plant 
that would operate its factory 
without a month's supply of coal? 
Most of them lay in a two or three 
months' supply of coal, and yet 
with the new fuel they build a 
small tank of a few days' supply 
and expect the railroads to deliver 
a car of oil every day. This would 
not be so hard to do if the cars 
were released in a few hours, 
which is ample time to empty a 
tank car, but the consumers hold 
the cars and use them for storage 
purposes while the other con- 
sumers are crying for oil. No, the 
railroads are doing well handling 
the new fuel, and we were the 
first to get in new tank cars and 
propose to keep up with the busi- 
ness. Let the users of oil build 
storage tanks to hold a month's 
supply and the railroads will do 
the rest." 



OIL DIRECTORY 



Leading Companies Now Opcrat 
ln£ in California. 



/HA.USTOGA Oil, AND DEVELOPMENT CO. 

are prepared to take contracts to 
develop other property; thoroughly 
equipped for 

SINKING WELLS QUICKLY AND ECO- 
NOMICALLY. 

Address Calistoga Oil and Development Com- 
pany, 24 Merchants' Exchange, San Francisco. 



/~1YGNET PETROLEUM CO, 

Capital $150,000 

50,000 shares at $3. 

Location — Fresno county. 

Directors— Chas. L Fair, president, Blitz W Pax- 
ton, vice-president, Chas. A. Lee, treasurer, John 
C. McElroy, secretary. 

Office— 561 Parrott Building. 

Tel.— South 184. 



D 



ABNEY Oil, COMPANY. 



J 



Oil Prospectuses 

Booklets, Stock Certificates, Letterheads, Envelopes, Dodgers, 
Letter Circulars, etc., 
Printed at short notice and at reasonable prices. £ 

£ Pacific Oil Reporter Job Office | 

I Rooms 31, 32 and 33 | 

I 318 Pine Street, San Francisco # 

5 I 

\u f-'-^j -Js'*° ■ fri'fe. #\** t -- H '!j_ #\ '"- #v — PV'l^ Ji*'-l Ji.% 

Business College and 
School of Engineering 

24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

THE CIVIL ENGINEERING C OURSE includes Geometry, Trigonometry, Drauehtine 
Strength of Maleuals. and Surveying. J ' *-" au s l *""S 

THE MUSING ENGINEERING COURSE includes Assaying, Blow Pipe Analysis Mill Con- 
struction, Milling. Miun.g. Gclngy, Mineralogy, economic Geology, Surveying and Mathematics 

ELECTRICAL AND ENGINEERING COURSE Electrical Engineering, Theoretical and 
Practical. Work hhrv and Laboratory Practice Const ruction. Mechanical Drawing, Mathematics etc 

THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT of this College affords unexcelled opportunities for 
he acquisition of a business education. Day and Evening Classes. 

g@-Wrlte Jon new 80-page Catalogue and College Journal. 




Incorporated. 
McKittrick district. 16 completed wells; no 
acres proven ground. 
Office, 330 Pine St., Room 5, San Francisco, Cal. 



G 



REAT NORTHERN Oil, CO. OF OAKLAND 

Capital $250,000 

250,000 shares at $i 

125,000 shares of treasury stock, 

Location of property, Glenn County, Calif,, 2,200 

acres, near Elk Creek, in Stoney Creek Mineral 

district. 

Officers, B F Arnold, President, Geo A Gray 
Secretary. 
Office, 476 Tenth street, Oakland, 



OBISPO OIL COMPANY. Capital, $1,000,000. 
Number of shares, 1,000,000. Treasury 
stock, 550,000 shares. All stock fully paid and 
non-asses;=able. Incorporated under the laws of 
California. Properties in Kern, Fresno, San 
Benito and San Luis Obispo counties, Cal. In- 
corporators: G R Parkinson, President Bank of 
Palo Alto; Captain Frank Barrett, Palo Alto, Cal.; 
K W Brown, Fresno, Cal.; Chas E Bond, Minne- 
apolis, Minn. ; C F Alderson Chicago, 111. Offi- 
cers: John F Giles, president; Frank Barrett, 
vice president; Chas E Bond, treasurer; C F 
Aid ei son, secretary, K W Brown, assistant secre- 
tary. Office, Suite 74. Citizens Bank building, 
119-121 La Salle street, Chicago, HI. 



OCCIDENTAL OIL COMPANY 
OF WEST VIRGINIA. 

Capital stock, 600,000 shares par value, $1.00 

Officers— Wm. Crites, president; F M. Graham, 
vice-president; J. B. Batz, treasurei, C. E. Hail- 
stone, secretary; T. L- Moran, manager; Kern 
Valley Bank, Cal., depository. 

Mostellar & Allen, San Francisco Agents, 346 
Parrott Bldg. Telephone. Jessie 1683- 



/"VIL LANDS, 

Near Sunset District, 

Kern County, California 
6000 acres. 



For sale or exchange— 



-Cheap 



MCAFEE BROTHERS, 
108 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY. Cap'tal stock, 
}2. 850,000; Par value, $1.00. Has 2,000 acres 
in Kern, Los Angeles and Summerland fields, 
with 27 producing wells. Officers and directors: 
P V Schermerhorn, president; C H Ritchie, vice- 
president; R D Robinson, secretary and treas- 
urer; D M Schermerhorn and W S Morton. Prin 
clpal office, P otomac building, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Tel. John 2281. 



SALINAS OIL AND DEVELOPMENT COM- 
PANY. Capital, $1, 000,000. 1,000,000 shares 
at $1 00. Land in Monterey county. Officers and 
directors: President, W N McCarthy. San Fran- 
cisco; vice-president, J J Gunn, Independence; 
treasurer, Wm N McCarthy; secretary, J B Olsen, 
San Francisco; superintendent, Jno C Quinu; C A 
Burchom, J E Baker, N A Dorn, W J Ellis and S 
S Simon, attorney, Hon Eugene F Bert. San Fran 
cisco Office, room 573-574 Parrott building, San 
Francisco. 



S 



URETY OIL COMPANY 



Capital $600,000 

600,000 shares par value $1.00 each. 

Location, 240 acres in section 20 and 29 T 3 N R 
16 W, S B M, Los Angeles County, Calif., Newhall 
district 

Officers and, Directors, M Esternaux. President, 
Geo. Greely King, Vice-President, T. H. Pearne, 
Secretary. D. A. Thieme, M. C. White. 

Farmers and Merchants Banks, depository. 

Office, 102 Henne Block, Los Angeles. Calif. 



8' 



TANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 



Capital Jjoo.ooo 

Treasury stock $150,000 

Location: 92 acres leased proven oil land in 
McKittrick; 80 acre-i owned in Coalinga near 
Home Oil company. Fresno; 160 acres owned ad- 
joining oil well in Napa valley. 

Officers: R A Falkenbere., president; R L Bis- 
by, vice-president; M J Henry, secretary; J G 
Steele, treasurer; F Cooke-Caldwell, attorney for 
company. 

Offices: 475-76 Parrott Building, 855 Market 
street, San Francisco, Cal. 



U. 



S. OIL AND MDSrTNG CO. 



Capital $300,000 

Par value-, $1 per share. 

Location: 320 acres in Kern River Distric 160 
acres in section 27, 11-24 Sunset district, near Blod- 
gett &Jewett wells, 1 10 acres on fraction t 26, 12-24, 
near Monarch, adjoining Jewett, Blodget & Beal 
gusher. L- M. Underwood, president, F Ketelhut 
secretary. 

Office — 211 19th street. Bflkersfield.lCal. 



WALDORF OIL AND ASPHALT COMPANY. 
Incorporated Feb 25, 1901. Capital, $500,000 
500,00c shares at $1,00 per share. Place of busi- 
ness, Kaaford, Cal. Headouajters at McCord & 
Son. Location of lands, 1.2, o, Guadalupe, Santa 
Barbara county, Cal. Officers and directors: Geo 
B McCord. president, Hanford; Dr N P Duncan, 
vice-president, Hanford; J O Hickman, treas- 
urer, Hanford; Wm M Madden, attorney for com- 
pany. San Francisco; W H Worswick, field super- 
intendent, Hanford; F Brader, Hanford, N Weis- 
baum, Hanford, U S Chittenden, Hanford, W H 
Worswick, Jr, Hanford. Jas Manasse, secretary. 



INCORPORATE OR 
INVEST IN ARIZONA 



A 

IF 



you wish to incorporate any en- 
terprise, send for booklet of in- 
formation on corporations and 
copy of Arizona laws, the cheap- 
est and most liberal laws in the 

United States 

We also attend to investments 
or procure information on any 
enterprise in Arizona. Capital 
for investment solicited. Address 

THE WESTERN 
INVESTMENT COMPANY 

ROOMS 1 AND 3 
PORTER BLOCK 

PHOENIX, ARIZONA 



For Lease 

Twenty acres of absolutely proven oil 
land in McKittrick district to lease on 
royalty basis for development work. 
Chance for good, responsible driller. 
Securities required. 

For further particulars, address, 

W. G. KERCKBOFF 

Wilcox Block, Los Angeles. 



SUNSET 
LIMITED 



One of the most magnificent trains 
ever built. For 1901-1902 TRi-WEBKtY 
via Coast Line and Sunset Route for 

NEW ORLEANS and 

NEW YORK 

Leave SAN FRANCISCO 4:50 p. m. 
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays. 

Leave LOS ANGELES 8:30 p. m. 
Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays. 

Arrive NEW ORLEANS 7:20 p. m. 
Thursdays, Saturdays, Mondays. 

Among the world's noted Highways of 
Travel not one equals the route of this 
train. Get the little book, " Wayside 
Notes," from any agent of the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Initial trip of Sunset Limited 
Friday, Dec. 6, from San Francisco. 



Oil Stocks 

Sold in New York and all Eastern 
Markets. Oil, copper and gold com- 
panies financed. 

liillyer, Clarke & Co.. 

Bankers and Brokers, 
52 Broadway, New York. 



Pacific 
Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Subscription, $2.50 Per Year 



PACFIt OIL RKPORTKR. 



OIL WELL 
Casing 

(BOSTON BRAND) 

Line Pipe 
Steam Pomps 
Valves and Fittings 
Belting 

Crane co. 

H. T. LALLY, Manager 



23-25 FIRST ST. 
24 FREMONT ST. 



San Francisco, Cal 




Smith=Premier L 
Typewriters 3 

Are Used Everywhere 

READ THIS LIST: 
Heald's Business College use. 30 
Southern Pacific Co. system . .47 

Western Dnion TeL Co 36 

S. F. Public Schools now use. . .43 
S. F.Call " ...21 



Hale Bros 

Viavi Co 

Cogswell College 

Miller, Scott & Sloss 



.14 
13 
.11 
.10 



Get information from us about 
the new SPEED Device. 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

no Montgomery St., S. F. 



nnnannnaQDnnnnnnnuannnnnna 
n Q 

g Before buying Oil Stock or g 
□ leasing or buying Oil Lands n 
g call on A. BARIEAU, Room g 
g 2 3 Columbian Building, 9 g 

n M arket Street, San Francisc a 
a Q 

gnnDannnnDDnDnnnDnnnannDDn 



American Tool Works L s mm - c E ^ E 

l 2li) Crocker Bulldln£ 

SAN FRANCISCO 



JOSEPH EASTWOOD, Proprietor. 

MANl'FACTl'RKRS OF 



Standard and Special Drilling Tools 



SPECIALTIES 

Petroleum Oil, Asphaltum and 
(• 'ndred hydrocarbons 



All Sizes of Hoagland'8 Patent Casing 
Spears lor Rent 

109=111 Mission Street, 

Bet. Spear and Main 

Telephone, Main 5578. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



A. ZEL ERBACIi & SONS 

TM PAPER H0U8E. 

41b, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bans. Twine 
and Supplies cf every description 
incidental to tl e trade. 



We carry the L*rgem mock. Our price, wt- 
KqulUble. 

Tel. Main, 1133. 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
ron Works 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

Oil Well Casing Oil St lis 

Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets. P. O. Box 231 

Telephone, Main 196. Baker Block. Station C 

Office. 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 




Atlas Pipe Wrench^C 

Received highest award at Pan-American Kxposition, Buffal.-, N. Y., igoi. 



IT HAS 
NO EQUAL 




NO THREADS 
TO STRIP 



Made in four sizes — io, 18, 24 and 36 inches. 

Atlas Tube Cleaner 

Received highest award at Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, N. Y., 1901 



For WateNube 
Boilers 




."" 



It Has No 
Equal 



Write for circulars. Ask your supply man. 
Manufactured by 



ATLAS PIPE WRENCH CO. Fl00d *S ci 

New York Office, 121 Liberty Street 



Francisco. 
Works, New Haven, Conn. 



When you want to swear go to 

LEBD. CRAIG 

Notary Public and 
Commissioner of Deeds 



316 Montgomery St. 

bet. California 

and Pine, San Francisco. 



The Road to Wealth 

Headquarters School and Governmen 
Lands. 

Lands all counties in California. No conditions 
on School Lands as to residence or cultivation 
Only $1.25 an acre. Locati„„i in all Mineral Belt. 
—Kern River, McKittrick, Devil's Den, Mojave, 
Sunset, Uoalinga and other famous districts. The 
Cheapest, Safest and Surest Investment in Amer- 
ca. Send Stamp for Land Book. 

WISEMAN'S LAND BUREAU 

105 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, California. 

400,100 Shares of Oil Stock 



DIVIDENDS. 

Dividend No. i was declared by (he Ventura 
Consolidated Crude Oil Company Nov. 15th. 
Regular dividends will be paid quarterly here- 
after. Company has 4 producing wells No. 5 
drilling; 2720 acres of oil land; also rich gold mine 
in Arizona. To continue rapid development 
work a block of treasMy stock is being sold at 
20 cents per share, par value, Ji. 00.— hull paid— 
Non-assessable. Reliable agent wanted. Ad- 
dress all oiders for stock or further particulars to 

W. G. YOUNG & CO., 

Fiscal Agents. 
628-30 Laughlin Bldg,, Los Angeles, Cel. 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame of machin The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 

oroil and gas works. It is usually advisable to 

ave boiler mounted upon trucks separate. Its tests range from shallow water wells to a lim*t of 2825 feet in depth, but it is especially 

recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily rooo feet of casing. 

One No. 4 Machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machines made that are absolutely without annoying springs. They are simple, 
powerful aud efficient, eisy to handle at work or on the road. Used in every State and Territof 
and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, Spuds etc 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO. 

Descriptiptive catalogue mailed f ee. 




i6 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



if tut t* ••^♦•••••^ •••* *m# n ^♦♦♦▼▼▼▼▼♦♦♦♦4) 



AUSTIN'S PORTABLE DRILLING RIGS 

„ Made in sizes to suit territory. Simple, powerful, effici.ut. 

Crude Oil Fuel Burning Plants for Boilers, Furnaces and Ovens. Boilers. 

Engines, Oil Storage and Wagon Tanks, Refining Equipment, 

■Oil, Gas and Artesian Well Supplies of every description, 

Drilling and Fishing Tools 

Standard Wrought Iron Pipe, Cast Iron and Mal- 
leable Iron Fittings. 

BRASS AND IRON VALVES 

Oil Well Casing, Tubing, Drive and Ljne Pipe, 

Catalogues, Estimates and Specifications 

furnished on application. 




Austin's Latest Improved Combination Drilling Machine. This machine will drill in ordinary formations at five times the speed of a Standard rig I 

GEORGE H. TAY COMPANY 

49 to 53 First Street, San Francisco 




For prices, etc., inquire 



W. FORGIE 

WASHINGTON, PA. 

Manufacturer of 

Oil & Gas Well Rig Irons 

Sand Reels, Cants, 
Arms and Pins. Also 
the Original Tool 
Wrenching Jack, the 
best and cheapest on 
the market. 



The Barrett Oil Well Swivel Wrench For?ar - rs 



bits in drilling stem boxes 




J. D. HOOKER, Los Angeles, Cal., PARKE & LACY CO., San 
Francisco, Cal„ Bakersfield, Cal. 



Drilllers, to be successful, should use the best and latest appliances 

as it is LABOR, TIME AND "MONEY SAVED. 

It is only necessy to have one of these wrenches for all sized bits- 
You simply change the top plates, which have different size squares 
to suit different size bits. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

J. BARRETT, Allegheny, Pa. 




DON'T FORGET 

Harron, Rickard & McCone 



With Large Stocks at 



BAKERSFIELD AND SAN FRANCISCO 



Will Fill Your Orders for 

OIL WELL SUPPLIES 



Promptly at Proper Prices 



21 Fremont Street 
SAIN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



16 Fish Buildlnft 
BAKERSFIELD, CAL. 



rtot 









♦ ♦♦♦ 



VOLUMK 3 



No. o 



ft 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., FRIDAY, JANUARY 3, 1902. 



H HHWON e 

f\-' DE-ALERS I N VJ 



READING DRIVE PIPE 
TUBING AND CASING 

SAN FRANCISCO 
411 MARKET STREET 



£359 



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THE WELL-KNOWN BRAND OF 




|| BOSTON CASING 



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<£> LINE PIPE 




DRIVE PIPE 
?*> TUBING 




As Manufactured by the 



NATIONAL TUBE COMPANY 



SSS > 5S $ SS*SS < SS ( 8^&S > 3S S 8S J 8S , SS < 8 



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For sale by Jobbers of Oil Well Supplies Through= 
out California and the Pacific Coast. 



PACIFIC Oil. RKPORTKR — SrPPI.! MINT 




Representative Oil Men of California. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER— SUPPLEMENT. 



The Great Northern, 

Glenn county has all the geo- 
logical conditions necessary for 
the presence of oil. The most 
competent oil experts and geolo- 
gists have made careful ex"mina- 
tion and have said the drills ought 
to discover at a certain depth 
strata of rich oil sand, containing 
oil of high gravity and having a 
paraffine base, which would make 
it valuable for refining purposes 
and give it a higher market value 
than the average iuel oil char- 
acteristic of California. Surface 
seepages are abundant, and the 
outcroppings of rock and sand- 
stone are all that can be desired 
by oil seekers. 

Of the companies operating in 
Glenn county the Great Northern 
Oil company is one of the strong- 
est and most enterprising. 

Mr. B. F. Arnold, whose portrait 
appears in the group in the 
supplement is president of the 
company, J. Devost is vice-presi- 
dent, G. A. Gray secretary, R. O. 
Gray treasurer and manager. The 
company has 440 acres of leased 
land, and 1,600 of government 
land, all located in the western 
portion of Glenn county, and con- 
venient to the railroad. Should 
oil be struck in paying quantities 
a pipe line could be run to the 
Sacramento river thus affording 
cheap water transportation. 

The well is now down 1,503 
feet, and is in good shape. Work 
has been suspended temporarily, 
but will be resumed again about 
the middle of this month. 

The company is well satisfied 
with present conditions, and there 
is ground for the belief that the 
drill will strike the oil sands at 
less than 2,000 feet. 

If this prove to be the case, the 
Great Northern Oil company, 
owing to its large acreage, will 



rank as one of the richest com- 
panies in the state. 

The management and personel 
of the directorship is all that could 
be desired. It is to be hoped the 
company will have the success its 
merit and energy deserves. 

Four Great Companies 

•Mr. J. E. Kerr, whose portrait is one. of 
the group in the supplement, has been 
in California in the oil business a little 
over a year. He came here from 
Chicago where he was a builder of rail- 
roads and a government contractor. 

Realizing the future greatness of our 
oil industry he came to California, and 
since then has been actively engaged in 
oil operations. During the year the com- 
panies with which he has been connected 
and of which he is the head, have sold 
nearly one million shares. 

The Paxtou Gold Bond Oil company 
has forty acres in Ventura, and has a 
well down 1000 feet. The land is sur- 
rounded by producing wells on all sides, 
there being at least fifty producers near- 
by yielding a refining oil. The well 
already has three oil strata, and will soon 
be completed. The Illinois Oil Bond 
company has land in Kern county in the 
heart of the district. It also has land in I 
Colusa, San Beuito, and Lake counties — 
1800 acres in all. 

The Wisconsin Gold Bond Oil company 1 
has land in Kern, Ventura, Lake and 1 
Colusa — 1S35 acres in all. 

The American Duchess has land in | 
Kern and Ventura 

Mr. Kerr states that active work will 
be commenced in these three last com- 
panies within a very short time. 

Much of the stock has been sold in the 
east where the reputation of Mr. Kerr is 
well known, and where he has established 
first-class financial connections. 



Full of Energy. 

C. M. Hatcher, whose portrait 
appears in the group in the 
supplement, is an energetic 
young man who has already made 
his mark and achieved success in 
business. 

He is largely interested in oil, 
and has also successfully promoted 
several important deals, especially 
railroad, in Southern and Central 



California. He is now in the 
East, partly on oil business, and 
partly for recreation. It is need- 
less to say he is meeting with suc- 
cess. He is connected only with 
first-class, legitimate enterprisse. 

KNOWS OIL LAND. 

One of the first men to realize the 
possibilities of Coalinga as an oil-produc- 
ing district was Mr. A. Barieau, whose 
portrait appears in the supplement. 

Years ago be had land in this district 
and was one of the first to interest capital 
in the development of this district which 
since then has proved so productive, and 
has brought such great wealth to many. 

Mr. Barieau has had much experience 
in the east as well as in California as a 
practical oil man and o 1 expert. 

He controls a large acreage of oil land 
in Fresno county and is the promoter of 
the Flashlight Oil Company, which ex- 
pects to be drilling very shortly. 

A few weeks ago Mr. Barieau sold a 
section of his land in this district to east- 
ern parties for {130,000. The parties 
who bought will commence development 
work at once on their land, which bears 
every indication of being first-class oil 
land. 

Producers' Oil Exchange 

The following were the stock sales in 

the Producers' Oil Exchange in the 
formal sessions held for the week ending 
Tuesday, December 31: 

BEAR FLAG. 

1000 at 04 40 00 

1500 at or 1500 

CALIFORNIA STANDARD. 

600 at 29 174 00 

1000 (S9o)at 30 300 00 

Iooo(Sgo)at 3T 31000 

7ooo(B30)at 32 224000 

4500 at 3r 1395 00 

1000 at 15 150 00 

1500 at r6 240 00 

1000 (B3o)at 31 310 00 

2ooo(Sqo)at 32 640 00 

3500 at 32 IT2C 00 

iooo(S6o)at 32 32000 

EL DORADO. 

100 at 25 25 00 

100 at 30 30 00 

100 at 33 33 00 

FOUR OIL. 

700 at 50 350 00 

HANFORD. 

i(Bgo) at 95 00 95 00 

HOME OIL. 
260 at 3 40 884 00 



335 00 
724 50 
660 00 



240 00 



60 00 



100 (Sgo)3 35 

210 at 3 45 

200 at 3 30 

TUNCTION. 
1000 (Sgo)at 24 

KERN RIVER. 

ro at 6 00 

KERN. 
200 at 5 375 ..:... 1075 00 

3° at 5 25 • r57 50 

LION. 

3400 at 08 272 00 

50 at 07 3 50 

MONARCH OF ARIZONA. 

900 at 29 180 00 

300 ar 19 57 00 

1800 at 2r 378 00 

rono at 18 180 00 

500 at 17 ... : 85 00 

200 at 22 44 00 

30o( B90) at 22 66 00 

MONTE CRISTO. 

250 at 1 75 437 so 

OCCIDENTAL OF W. VA. 

1250 at 20 250 00 

600 at 21 12600 

500 at 22 no 00 

50o(B3o) at 23 115 00 

OIL CITY PETROLEUM. 

1000 at 20 200 00 

900 at 21 189 00 

PEERLESS. 

80 at 5 00 400 00 

ioo(Bgo)at 5 25 525 00 

PETROLEUM CENTER. 

380 at 03 ir 40 

REED CRUDE. 

284 at 34 96 56 

STERLING. 

800 at 1 15 920 00 

100 at r r25 ir2 50 

500 at 1 10 550 00 

SAN JOAQUIN O. & D. 

20 (Boo) 6 50 130 00 

SUPERIOR. 

100 at 08 8 00 

3098 at 07 21686 

THIRTY-THREE. 

45 at 7 25 326 25 

50 at 7 00 350 00 

WOLVERINE. 
500 at 50 250 00 



Shares 49,118 



Amount $18,512 57 






Four Great Oil Companies of California. 









The Pax ton Gold Bond Oil Company's 

land is located in Ventura County, where 
the highest grade of refining oil is found 
that always commands a high cash price 
at the well. This company's land is lo- 
cated in the famous oil districts of Torey 
Canyon, Topo Canyon, Sespe, Piru, 
Adam's Canyon, Silver Thread, the fam- 
ous Bard wells and the Ojai Branch 
wells, at least 350 producing wells, on 
whose production millions of dollars of 
dividends have been declared, surround 
the land of this company, which is the 
center of a long procession of dividend 
payers. This county produces more 
high grade refining oil than any district 
west of the Rockies. It has the largest 
capitalized oil companies on the west 
side of the continent: the Union, $10,000; 
Pacific Coast, $1,500,000; the United 
Petroleum, $1,500,000. One of these com- 
panies has paid $13,000,000 in dividends; 
another $10,000,000. Highest developed 
transportation facilities in North Amer- 
ica. Two railroads, 600 miles of pipe 
line, to refineries and tide water. 

Investors knowing the value of this 
company's stock, over subscribed the 
first block of 100,000 shares to the 
amount of 19,000 shares. This stock 
started at a few cents per share and has 
steadily advanced until it is now worth 
$1. 

Our first well is now 1100 feet deep 
and in oil. Contracts have been let for 
the immediate drilling of other wells. 

Paxton Gold Bond Oil Co. 

Mills Building 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

PAX 

n BROADWAY, N. Y. 



The Illinois Oil Bond Company 

has absolutely proven oil lands in Kern 
county, with a producing well of more 
than 200 barrels per day, surrounded by 
some of the best produeing wells in the 
famous Kern field. It has other lands in 
four of the famous districts of the state, 
aggregating over 1800 acres. 

This company gives a SECURITY 
Gold Bond, endorsed by a trust com- 
pany of $1,000,000 paid up capital, guar- 
anteeing the drilling of ten wells in one 
year. Ten wells means a fortune in divl 
dends for stockholders in this company 
Small block of stock 20c per share. 

Send for oil chart. 

We have a producing well, we have 
the tools to drill others, we have oil for 
dividends, bonds to make investors safe 
— the business management that pre- 
cludes failure. 

Our charter is legal, our by-laws are 
lawful and stable, our stock unassessable, 
and our proposition safe, rich, sound. 

BRANCH OFFICES 

11 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Room 506, 167 Dearborn St., Chicago, Ills. 

ILLINOIS OIL BOND CO. 

FIRST FLOOR MILLS BUILDING 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



The Wisconsin Gold Bond Oil Company 

has one of the best oil propositions on 
the Pacific Coast. It has placed more 
*han 221,000 shares since September. 
It closed a deal of 100,000 shares through 
La Crosse, Wis., parties last wepk of De- 
cember. 

Its officers and directors are men who 
have made a success in other lines of 
business, such as banking, manufactur- 
ing, etc. 

The management is in the hands of 
careful, conservative business men. 

Its land is in the famous Kern River 
district, surrounded by some of the big- 
gest producing oil wells of the field, also 
in tour other oil districts of the state. 

It gives a Security Gold Bond to its in- 
vestors, that absolutely protects them 
against loss. If for any reason investors 
are dissatisfied with their investment, m 
one year they can surrender their stock 
and take the bond for the full amount of 
their investment. No possible chance of 
their losing a fraction of their invested 
cash. The entire proposition is safe, 
conservative and legitimate. 

A small block of 20,000 shares is now 
offered at 20 cents per share. Investors 
should not overlook this proposition, but 
write for official map and illustrated 
prospectus to 

Wisconsin Gold Bond Oil Co. 

Mills Building 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 

I,a Crosse and Baraboo, Wisconsin 

II Broadway, New York City 



American Duchess Oil Company 

The officers and directors of this new 
company have brought to an undoubted 
financial success, three others of the best 
known oil companies of California. They 
have sold during the depressed oil mar- 
ket of summer and fall in a business 
way, through legitimate channels, nearly 
one million (1,000,000) oil shares. 

This company has land in two of the 
most famous oil districts of California- 
Kern River district and in Ventura 
county; lands absolutely proven. Large 
producing wells immediately surround 
this property. 

They offer a block of stock of 50,000 
shares at ten cents per share. 

If you have any doubts as to the value 
or validity of their holdings or the integ- 
rity or the business ability of the man- 
agement it will pay you to investigate 
this proposition. 

They do not offer you stock with im- 
possible dividends in an incredibly short 
space of time. You buy your oil shares 
as you would any other investment. First, 
you get posted on the investive value in 
all details. Then, if you purchase stock 
they give you a secured investment. 

They also can convince you they have 
as certain prospects because of their man- 
agement, because of their oil location, be- 
cause of their methods, because of their 
financial connections, as any other oil 
company doing business on the Pacific 
Coast. 

AMERICAN DUCHESS OIL CO. 

Boom 7, First Foor, Mills Bdlg,, 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Vol. 3. No. 9. 



SAN I-RANCISCO. CAL.. FRIDAY. JANUARY 3. 1902. 



BETWEEN TWO GREAT YEARS. 



Remarkable Recent Expansion and Transfor- 
mation In California's Oil Industry. 



Surprising Realities of Production, Consumption and 

Splendid General Progress with Greater Things 

at Hand for the Coming Year. 

A year of remarkable progress featuresof the field of consumption, 
and profound change has closed There is now an overproduction, 
for the California oil industry and ' rei S n of low prices, and a condi- 



another year pregnant with still 
greater progress and more profound 
changes in conditions opens before 
it The mile post of the New 
Year is passed in the continuous 



tion of difficulties and discourage- 
ments besetting producers, yet the 
industry never exhibited such 
splendid promise nor inspired such 
general faith in Its future great- 
ness and prosperity as it does now. 



progress of an evolution so rapid Never was the basis for such faith 
and so productive of great things more clearly apparent. Petroleum 
that it constitutes an industrial has risen to second place in the 



barrels s year. We find that there 
are 355 productive wells that Btaod 
capped and idle. Of these 234 are 
in the Kem River field. If the 
average capacity of these capped 
wells is taken to e<|ual the average 
of the 184 producing wells we 
have an addition of approximately 
5.000000 barrels to the present 
producing capacity of this 6 eld 
alone. This added to 10,000,000 
gives 15,000,000 barrels as the 
capacity of all producing wells 
plus the capped wells of the Kern 
River field. There are 121 capped 
wells of much lower capacity in 
the other fields, and the wells that 
have produced the recent 28,000 
barrels per day could have been 
crowded to a higher output under 
the stimulus of more favorable 
conditions. Perhaps a million bar- 
rels may thus be added to raise 
the total capacity of the 2400 or 
so productive wells of the state to 



Prick. Ti 

nn. re tlinn double it. This would 
give the K< rn River field a present 
capacity of about B rrels 

a year, or more than the total out- 
put (if the state in 1901. 

These figures briefly illustrate 
the wonderful store of petroleum 
in this famous field, a store esti- 
mated lo exceed the total product 
of the United States to date. They 
call to mind the exceptional pro- 
ductiveness of its wells and the 
looming and controlling figure it 
cuts in the field of the industry. 
The Kern River field must for a 
considerable time be the chief 
factor in the regulation of prices 
and markets. With such a field, 
possessing such a present and 
reserve productive power, must oil 
fields of less capacity and even 
less advantageous situation con- 
tinue to compete. 

It may be briefly noted, from 
the productive point of view that 



-i^??:!?S^3 



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■ 




tm-pi 



- 



POINT RICHMOND, WHERE DEEP-WATER VESSELS WILL LOAD AND UNLOAD OIL FOR THE STANDARD OIL COMPANY 



romance, and the New Year is 
simply a natural and convenient 
time to take a general retro- 
spective and prospective view. 

A review of the industry covers 
two great fields — those of produc- 
tion and disposition. At thistime 
production cuts a secondary 
figure and is canvassed mainly in 
its relation to the great problems 
of markets and prices which now 
dominate the industry. This is 
one of the great transfoimations 
the past year has wrought. One 
year ago the industry was still 
vibrant with the search for and 
development of new oil fields, the 
exploitation of oil companies, the 
news of "strikes" and the hulla- 
baloo about oil stocks. Now all 
intelligent interest centers in 
transportation, prices, pipe lines, 
industrial organization, increase of 
fuel oil consumption, refining, new- 
uses, new maikets and other 



state's mineral products and will 
stay there. 

To turn first to the productive 
phase it is to be noted that the 
year has made a phenomenal 
record. The reliable figures pre- 
sented elsewhere by the Pacific 
Oil Reporter show a total actual 
output of nearly 8,750,000 barrels 
as compared with 4.329,950 barrels 
in 1900 and 2,292,123 barrels in 
1899. Yet so great has been the 
increase in the productive capacity 
of the discovered fields that it 
would now be possible to exceed 
the rate for the past year by 
several million barrels. 

Various interesting facts can be 
deduced from the statistical state- 
ment referred to. The daily 
average production in November 
and December was about 28,000 
barrels. The actual current pro- 
duction in the past few weeks has 
been at the rate of over 10,000,000 



the rate of 16,000,000 barrels a 
year. There are 200 wells being 
drilled in proven fields which 
gives a large prospective addition 
to the possible production in sight. 
These estimates are sufficiently 
reliable for general purposes. 

One striking feature of the pro- 
ductive situation thus presented is 
the remarkable figure the great 
Kern River field is seen to cut. 
We see 184 wells producing 3,870,- 
000 barrels, while 1,013 wells in 
the Los Angeles field produced 
1,255,000 barrels, 297 Summerland 
wells yielded 128,000 barrels, and 
so on. We see that with most 
of its wells capped the Kern River 
field produced about 45 per cent 
of the total output of the state. If 
we assume the rate of the capped 
wells to be that of the producing 
wells we have the facts that this 
field could add 4,900,000 barrels 
to its yearly production or much 



during the year but one new field 
worthy of note has been developed. 
That is the Santa Maria or Car- 
reaga field in Santa Barbara 
county, where the Western Union 
Oil company not long ago brought 
in some splendid deep wells, one 
of which is credited with 200 
barrels a day capacity. There are 
now five producing and six drill- 
ing wells, and this field, with a 
good grade of oil and a situation 
near the coast, seems to have a 
prosperous future. 

Wells to the number of some 
hundreds have been drilled in 20 
non-producing counties and proved 
failures. They have been ranged 
from Humboldt and Shasta coun- 
ties on the north 650 miles south, 
through the Coast Range and the 
Sacramento and San Joaquin val- 
leys, to the Colorado desert in 
San Diego county. Drilling is 
still proceeding at many points 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



throughout this range of territory. 
The great advantage that a coast 
field would possess in convenient 
water transportation stimulates 
search in certain districts despite 
the over-production in valley 
fields. Similar considerations en- 
courage prospecting in the lower 
San Joaquin valley about Stockton. 
The early discovery of other new 
producing fields may be con- 
fidently predicted. 

The field of the industry is en- 
cumbered with the wrecks of a 
host of oil companies that were 
noisily crying oil stocks one year 
ago. Every spur to production 
was then playing, oil prices were 
good, the glamour was still shed 
from various new Coal Oil 
Johnnies, promoters were the 
captains of the industry and the 
oil boom was at flood tide with 
the speculative public. 

Increase of production cul- 
minated about April, supply over- 
took demand and the bottom shot 
out of the oil stock boom. Weak 
producing companies sacrificed 
their oil and prices dropped as low 
as 15 cents per barrel in the field. 
The market was demoralized and 
the industry, with the stock boom 
let out of it, was left inchoate. 
The weed.ng out of weak com- 
panies began and the law of the 
survival of the fittest began its 
play. Districts then boomed are 
new forgotten. Forces working 
in the line of the legitimate and 
efficient development of the in- 
dustry loomed into clearer view 
and have since grown in strength 
and importance. The economic 
side of the industry took the field. 
There are now 1,500,000 barrels 
in storage in all fields, so that, 
with a consumption estimated at 
the current rate of 7,000,000 to 
8,000,000 barrels a year, with an 
existing producing capacity some 
millions of barrels in excess of the 
current output, and with further 
increase of producing capacity in 
light, there is no prospect of any 
shortage in the petroleum supply 
in the near future. It may be re- 
called that only a year ago, when 
fuel oil had but fairly started on 
its career of industrial conquest, 
large power users were waiting to 
see an assurance of a sufficient oil 
supply and permanence of reason- 
able prices in sight before risking 
an abandonment of the more costly 
coal. The champions of the indus- 
try were then chiefly engaged in 
booming production and demon- 
strating vigorously that there was 
oil enough in the ground to feed 
the market. How striking is the 
change! 

The story of the other side of 
the petroleum industry is told in a 
different spirit and tone. Here 
we find the hope, confidence, glory 
and promise of the industry and 
the measure of its power and mean- 
ing. The past year has done 
great things for California petro- 
leum in the worlds of economics 
and industry. Here is the other 
side of the tale of production and 
surplus. In the practical doubling 
of the rate of consumption within 
a few months and the assurance 
of an early multiplication of the 
present rate we have the answer 
as to what the future is to be. 

Among the many looming feat- 
ures of the year the one of great- 
est significance is the entry into 
the field of the California oil in- 
dustry of the Standard Oil Com- 
pany with its unlimited capital, 
its perfect organization of method 
and its ambition, if not proposal, 
to control the oil business here. 
One year ago the Standard, which 



had always confined itself here to 
the kerosene market had not sig- 
nified its intention to take an 
interest in California crude oil. 
Since then it has entered the field 
in its wholesale way and pro- 
ceeded to make an initial invest- 
ment of about $10,000,000. It has 
bought the oil fields, refining plant, 
etc., of the Pacific Coast Oil Com- 
pany, the oldest and largest oil 
company of the state, and is now 
proceeding to erect at Point 
Richmond on the bay shore one of 
the largest oil refineries in the 



dreamed of as a blessing that 
might come with future years. 
The propostition that this pipe 
line will work a profound revolu- 
tion needs no elucidation. 

The year has seen the chief 
railroads of the state adopt oil as 
locomotive fuel and they will soon 
be consumers at the rate of 4,000,- 
000 barrels per year. This has 
been the overshadowing factor in 
the increase of consumption. Next 
to it is the tremendous gain in 
consumption in the great manu- 
facturing region of San Francisco 



I CALIFORNIA'S OIL RECORD IN 1901 % 



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9\ 

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9\ 

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Producing 
Producing Fields Wells 

Newhall, Santa Paula and Ventura.. 
Puente 



293 
34 



The following statement of the oil production of the 
past year in California and of existing conditions in 
the producing fields is a wholly reliable one that is the 
result of a careful and intelligent canvass prosecuted 
with much time and expense, and is the first reliable 
one that has been prepared. It contains neither exag- 
geration nor guesswork and is of great value as a basis 
upon which to form intelligent judgments: 

Production 

Bbls. 
612,000 
141,500 

1,255,000 
128,000 
740,000 
6l2,000 
724,000 

3,870,000 
430,000 
188,500 

4,000 
7.500 

Total 2040 8,742,500 

Average daily total production for year 23,900 bbls 

For want of a market for the oil there are now "shut 
in" and not being pumped, the following number of 
wells in the districts named: 

Coalinga 33 Sunset 32 

Kern River 234 Midway 12 

McKittrick 41 Santa Maria ,.. 3 

Total of capped wells 355 

Wells are now being drilled in producing fields as 
follows: 



Los Angeles ■. 1013 

Summerland 297 

Coalinga 41 

Whittier 55 

Fullerton and Brea Canyon 69 

Kern River 184 

McKittrick 22 

Sunset 25 

Midway 2 

Santa Maria ; 5 



Fullerton and Brea 

Canyon 27 

Kern River 25 

McKittrick 4 

Sunset 26 

Midway 20 



1* 



Newhall, Santa Paula 

and Ventura 33 

Puente 3 

Los Angeles 29 

Coalinga 8 

Whittier 20 

Santa Maria 6 

Total of drilling wells 201 

Approximate daily average production for 

November and December, 1901 28,000 bbls 

Stocks on hand in all fields, December 

31. 1901 1,500,000 bbls 

During the year, drilling has been prosecuted in 
the counties of Shasta, Humboldt, Tehama, Glenn, 
Colusa, Butte, Napa, Solano, Marin, Conta Costa, Santa 
Clara, Santa Cruz, San Mateo, Stanislaus, Tulare, San 
Benito, Monterey, San Luis Obispo", Riverside, San 
Bernardino and San Diego, but these wells have, as 
yet, resulted in no production. 



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United States, with the reported 
intention of providing a capacity 
of 10,000 barrels a day or about 
3,500,000 barrels a year. 

By far the biggest feature of its 
plans, in the influence to be exerted 
on the industry is the great 8-inch 
pipe line which will reach from 
the Kern county fields 270 miles 
to the terminal refining and ship- 
ping point at Point Richmond. 
This line is expected to be ready 
for operation by fall. Last New 
Year such a pipe line was faintly 



and adjacent bay shores. San 
Francisco power users to the num- 
ber of 130, including the greatest 
ones, are now consuming oil at the 
rate of 1,000,000 barrels per year, 
and there is no question that this 
consumption will soon be doubled 
or trebled in the use of oil for 
steam-raising alone. 

The past few months have seen 
oil fuel adopted on railroad passen- 
ger and freight ferryboats, on 
many bay craft and on some coast- 
ing vessels. The Pacific Coast 



Steamship company is investigat- 
ing its merits. But asmall start has 
been made in the marine use of 
oil, but with the situation as it is 
and with the success of oil fuel in 
steamships of the Black Sea, Medi- 
terranean and Indian Ocean it 
appears certain that California 
petroleum will largely drive the 
multiplying leviathans of the 
Pacific deep. 

During the year at hand refin- 
eries building, enlarging and 
planned will handle an enormously 
greater amount of oil, amounting 
to thousands of barrels per day, and 
the future of refining here is 
almost limitless. To burn crude 
oil for fuel as it comes from the 
ground is economic waste. The 
heaviest oils yield by fractional dis- 
tillation, the lighter oils, lubricat- 
ingoils and heavy basic asphaltum. 
A large residue remains between 
the more volatile elements and the 
solid asphaltum, splendidly adapted 
for fuel. The heavy Russian oils, 
so much like ours, are refined and 
there only the residuum ("astatke") 
is used for fuel. Such will doubt- 
less be the California rule. There 
is a large future for oil in making 
gas for illumination, fuel and for 
gas engines. The Golden Gate 
opens to an enormous future mar- 
ket in which Hawaii alone yet 
cuts a figure. 

During the year two California 
coal mines have ceased mining 
steam coal through the competition 
of oil. Imports of steam coal re- 
main nearly normal but with the 
great increase of fuel consumption 
this means great inroads by fuel 
oil. Fuel oil has won its way all 
over the state and even to the 
mines of the Sierras — all within 
the past year. The coming year 
will break the record of new con- 
sumption in every direction. 

Many other features of more or 
less importance belong to the story 
of the year. A leading one is the 
effort at combination among the 
large producers of the Kern River 
field to control output and prices. 
This and other efforts at industrial 
organization will play leading 
parts in the oil drama of 1902. 

Shortage of railroad tank cars 
has been an unfortunate and re- 
pressing factor that will continue 
until the pipe line is ready. 

An intelligent insight into the 
situation affords nothing but op- 
timism as to the splendid future of 
the oil industry and the kingly 
place it is to occupy in California's 
march to the incomparable future 
that awaits her. 



Los Angeles Stocks. 

The closing week of the year was not 
a very active one on the Los Angeles 
Stock Exchange owing to the interrup- 
tion of holiday festivities. The general 
trend of the market was steady and the 
fluctuations of different securities were 
due to the incidental balance of buying 
and selling orders rather than to any 
disturbing influence. 

As usual with recent trading on the 
board a considerable portion of the busi- 
ness was done in mining stocks. This 
class of securities appears to be making 
for itself an ever increasing popularity. 
Among the favorite traders of the week 
were Butte Lode, Verde King Copper, 
Wedge, and Black Hills Copper. 

Among the oil stocks Reed Crude and 
Westlake were the most active, both 
showing fractional gains which they 
maintained strongly to the close. 

The exchange has just taken steps to 
move from its present headquarters to a 
very desirable new location on Second 
street in the center of the banking dis- 
trict. This move is looked upon as a 
favorable one for the institution and it 
is thought that with the new facilities 
thus afforded the growing business of 
the exchange may be more easily 
handled. 



CALIFORNIA REFINERIES. 



PACIFIC OIL RRPORTRR. 



The Present Large Capacity to Be Greatly 
Increased. 



A Small Army of Men Now Employed In Erecting Sev- 

eral Large Refineries in Various Counties 

in California. 



How shall the immense and 
constantly increasing prod action 
of crude petroleum in California 
be consumed? 

This is a question that is seri- 
ously troubling our oil men, and a 
satisfactory solution of the problem 
is helped in a great measure at 
least when the refineries now In 
operation or in course of construc- 
tion are considered. 

Today, the refining of California 
oils is far more extensive than is 
generally comprehended. Com- 



and this gives a disagteeable odor 
when burned. A light California 
oil yields up to 25 per cent of a 
fair grade of illuminating oil. 

The usual products by distilla- 
tion which have been sought for 
and found marketable with our 
simpler and inexpensive methods 
of refining are: Aspbaltum, from 
10 to 25 per cent; naphthas, un- 
der the various names of gasoline, 
stove naphthas and benzine, from 
10 to 20 per cent; distillates, gas 
and fuel, from 20 to 50 per cent; 



company, at Oleum, Contra Costa The plant of the Union Oil corn- 
county : the Pacific Coast Oil com pany is at Oleum. Contra I 
pany, the Paraftine Paint com- county, on the bay shore. 
pany. Some of these use only city, ji>o barrels. The products 
the lighter oils, manufacturing are Decline, illuminating oil, gas 
the lighter products, while the engine distillate, gas distillate, 
others seek chiefly to make a lubricating oils and asphaltum. 
specialty of asphaltum production. The Paraffine Paint Company of 

Asphaltum, as a semi liquid San Francisco has a small plant at 

product called maltha, now enters Emeryville, Alameda county, with 

largely into use as a valuable Mux a capacity of 180 barrels a day. 

or solvent for the harder and na- Asphaltum, prepared for roofing 

tural asphalts used for paving and other paints, and various dis- 

purposes everywhere. Theharder stilates are the prodtn ts. 

asphalts have a varied applica- These are all the oil refineries in 

tion, for coating steel and iron the bay region. The only other 

pipe, the manufacture of street one "north of Tehachapi," is the 

and interior electric conduits, for Jewett & Blodgett refinery in the 

paints, varnishes, roof covering, Sunset field, at the head of the 

etc. j San Joaquin vallev. thirty miles 

Distillates, so called, and as from Bakersfield, established in 

known to the public commercially, r8ot. The capacity is about 500 



are used by gas companies for di- 
rect manufacture or enrichment of 
gas, for use in gas engines or 
motors, and now in California 
reaching a large and increased 



barrels a day. The average heavy 
oil or maltha refined in the past 
yielded the following products: 
distillates, 20 percent; lubricating 
oils, 12 per cent; heavy distillates, 






The site of the new refinery of the Pacific Coast Oil Company (Standard) at Point Richmond, occupying no acres, and shown in tne foreground of this picture. Across the marsh in the 
background is the spur track of the Southern Pacific Company, j ust constructed from the maiu line to the refinery grounds, tc compete with the Santa Fe. A force of zoo men is now employed 
building roads, wharves, houses, etc. This force will be increased to 400 men by the middle of the month. The refinery will cost over $3,000,000. 



petent authorities place the ca- 
pacity of the refineries of this state 
at 150,000 barrels per month or 
1,800,000 barrels per year. 

California oils, even the lighter 
oils, principally of Southern Cali- 
fornia, which heretofore have been 
mainly used, yield a low per- 
centage and a low grade of illu- 
minating oils, and such oils are 
not the chief product of refining, 
as with the Pennsylvania pe- 
troleum. That oil yields from 50 
to 80 per cent of the best illumina- 
ting oil in the world. California 
oils, like those of most of the 
world's fields, are of a heavier 
gravity and of a different chemi- 
cal composition. It has an as 
phaltum instead of a paraffine 
base, and the proportion of carbon 
to hydrogen is higher than in the 
Pennsylvania oil. This gives too 
little hydrogen to consume the 
carbon, and the oil burns with a 
sooty flame. It generally con- 
tains nitrogen and often sulphur 



illuminating and lubricating oils 
from 20 to 50 percent. 

Our crude oils used in refining 
range from 1 4. gravity Baume 
(lar<ely the products ot Kern and 
Los Angeles counties) through 
the various products of Whittier, 
18 'gravity; Ventura county, 24 
gravity; Fullerton and Puente, ?2 
gravity, and Coalinga 45 gravity, 
with varying qualities and gravi- 
ties between and beyond those 
named. 

Although a fair beginning in 
refining of California oils dates 
back only a few years, it has al- 
ready reached an important point. 
Among the principal refineries al- 
ready in operation are the follow- 
ing: Tbe Puente Oil company, us- 
ing only its own production, 34 
gravity oil; the Asphalt Oil and 
Refining company, the Franklin 
Refining company, Sunset Refin- 
ing company, American Oil and 
Asphalt company, Southern Re- 
fining company, the Union Oil 



consumption in ordinary cook 
stoves and house furnaces. The 
gasoline and naphthas are utilized 
as everywhere for use in isolated 
gas plants and the ordinary 
naphtha or gasoline stove in 
homes, factories, etc. The illu- 
minating and lubricating oils are 
in universal use. 

The largest oil refinery in the 
state is the one of the Pacific Coast 
Oil company at Alameda Point on 
San Francisco Bay. This is also 
the oldest existing refinery. The 
plant comprises thirteen stills with 
a total daily capacity of 2,215 bar- 
rels. The tankage provided is: 
for crude, 54,000 barrels; for re- 
fined and byproducts, 16,000 bar- 
rels. The crude oil comes mainly 
from the Newhall district, South- 
ern California, being transported 
in a tank steamer and a tank 
barge. Thirty-two men are em- 
ployed. The products are gaso- 
line, illuminating oil, lubiicants, 
other distillates and asphaltum. 



13 per cent; asphaltum 55 per cent. 
The recent developments in the 
Sunset field have greatly changed 
the conditions attending this plant. 

The McWhorter refinery at 
Kern, which was destroyed by fire 
two weeks ago, had six small stills, 
and its product was used almost 
entirely in supplying the large 
local demand. It is understood 
this refinery will be rebuilt on a 
larger scale. 

There are five refineries in Los 
Angeles county, four being in the 
city of Los Angeles. The largest 
one is that of the Puente Oil com- 
pany at Chino, capacity, 1200 bar- 
rels. It was established in 1895. 
A pipe line fifteen miles long con- 
veys the crude oil supply from the 
company's wells in the Puente field. 
This company produces about 125,- 
000 barrels of crude oil per year 
and has produced 1,500,000 bar- 
rels. The company has a long 
term contract to supply the Chine 
beet sugar refinery with fuel oil 



6 ===== 

and provides most of this supply 
from its refinery. In 1900 the 
refinery handled 120,000 barrels of 
crude oil, the refined product be- 
ing 35,833 barrels. The output 
was mainly as follows: gasoline, 
105,000 gallons; painters' benzine, 
50,000 gallons; water-white oil, 
450,000 gallons; gas engine dis- 
tillate, 900,000 gallons. 

The Franklin Refinery company 
has an 850-barrel plant at Los 
Angeles and in 1900 handled 20,- 
000 barrels of crude oil. The 
products are gasoline, gas engine 
distillate, gas distillate, green oil, 
lubricating oil and asphaltum. 

The Asphaltum Oil and Refinery 
company, Los Angeles, ham les 
700 barrels of Fullerton oil daily. 

The American Oil and Asphalt 
company, Los Angeles has the 
oldest refinery in that city, 
capacity 675 barrels. The products 
are distillates and asphaltum. 

The Southern Kefining company 
has a new and small plant at Los 
Angeles, and the Hercules Oil 
Producing company has a capacity 
of 1,000 barrels a day. 

At Obispo, Los Angeles county, 
the Sunset Oil Refining company 
has a plant with a capacity of 
1200 barrels perday. 

Without going any farther let 
us see what the daily consumption 
of the refineries as at present ex- 
isting amounts to. 

NAME. BBLS. 

Pacific Coast 2215 

Union 900 

Paraffine Paint 1S0 

Jewett & Blodgett 500 

Puente 1200 

Franklin 850 

Asphaltum 700 

A.merican 675 

Southern Refining 250 

Hercules 1000 

Sunset 1200 

Total 9670 

In round numbers, and this is 
not placing the amount too high, 
the refineries as existing at pres- 
ent, and mostly south of Teha- 
chapi, can consume 10,000 barrels 
of crude oil a day, which, esti- 
mating the average output of 
Southern California oil wells at 
twenty barrels a day, is the pro- 
duct of 500 wells. But there are 
1,013 wells in Los Angeles which 
do not begin to average twenty 
barrels a day. They will not 
average ten barrels and even that 
is a high estimate. 

Now let us consider the new re- 
fineries that are actually being 
constructed or are being planned. 

In Bakersfield the Union Oil 
company is now busily engaged 
in completing the erection of a 
refinery which was begun early 
in November. This refinery will 
have a capacity of nearly 2,000 
barrels a day. The company will 
continue to operate its plant on 
the bay, but it is said will use the 
Oleum plant to refine the distil- 
lates obtained at Bakersfield. The 
latter plant will ship to the east 
the asphaltum obtained from the 
crude oil, and will ship the dis- 
tillate to the bay, thus saving a 
large item in transportation, and 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



securing a big profit on the 
asphaltum. 

Another company that will be 
ready for business before February 
is the Pacific Refining company, 
which is just now completing its 
plant "'hich will have a capacity 
of 1,000 barrels of crude oil daily 
It will manufacture asphalt and 
illuminating oil, and expects to 
get 20 per cent of the latter com- 
modity. It will ship the asphalt 
in barrels to New York and other 
eastern points. 

There are a number of small re- 
fineries under way around the 
bay and in Los Angeles which to- 
gether will probably consume 500 
barrels a day. 

Considerable talk has been 
made and much space occupied in 
the daily press concerning a re- 
finery to be erected in Stockton 
in connection with the project of 
General W. H. H. Hart for the 
reduction of iron ore, and the es- 
tablishment of an immense iron 
and steel plant. In the absence 
of General Hart in the East noth- 
ing new can be obtained, but be- 
fore he left he gave it out as a 
certainty that the refinery would 
be built and the great iron and 
steel plant constructed. He said 
the necessary capital had all been 
subscribed, the final papers were 
being drawn up and the plans 
perfected. 

If his plans do not miscarry, the 
proposed Stockton plant will con- 
sume 10,000 barrels a month. 

Whether or no this and other 
refineries are completed the fact 
is certain that to-day over 200 men 
ire at work at Point Richmond 
doing the preliminary work for 
the erection of the new refining 
plant of the Pacific Coast Oil com- 
pany, and that before the middle 
of the month this force will be 
more than doubled. 

The Alameda plant has been 
found to be entirely too small. 
The business has grown out of all 
proportion to the capability of the 
plant now, nearly twenty-five years 
in the same location, to handle it. 

A site of no acres has been pur- 
chased at Foint Richmond near 
the terminal of the Santa Fe, and 
the Southern Pacific, not to be 
outdone by the Santa Fe, is build- 
ing a spur track into the grounds. 

The land is on the bay shore 
where there is water enough to 
float the largest ships, so that the 
tank steamers of greatest tonnage 
can easily approach and unload or 
receive their cargoes of crude or 
refined petroleum, asphalt, etc. 

The accompanying photograph 
shows the site of the refinery, and 
before this year closes a plant will 
be completed which will have a 
capacity of handling 10,000 barrels 
of crude petroleum daily. 

The Pacific Coast Oil company 
is now a branch of the Standard 
Oil. It has behind it the millions 
of this great corporation. It has 
the advantages of its experience, 



its business methods, its scientific 
tests and researches. 

This refinery will be one of the 
largest in the world, and will 
represent an expenditure of $3,- 
500,000. 

It will be the terminal of the 
great pipe line the Standard is 
building from Kern county to the 
bay, nearly 300 miles in length, 
which also represents an expendi- 
ture of $3,000,000, and fpr which 
the right of way has now been 
entirely secured. 

The material for this pipe line 
is now being constructed in the 
East as rapidly as possible. 

As soon as enough pipe is 
finished to warrant the commence- 
ment of the work without danger 
of any cessation from lack of 
material, train-load after train-load 
of pipe will be rushed to Califor- 
nia and, by the time the refinery 
is ready to receive it, the pumping 
stations along the line will be 
ready to force the oil from Bakers- 
field into the tanks at Point 
Richmond. 

Now let us see what the re- 
fineries will do for the oil industry 
of this state. 

It has already been shown that 
the refineries consume nearly 10,- 
000 barrels a day. 

In a few months the consump- 
tion will be as follows: 

Previously reckoned 9,670 

Union , 2,000 

Pacific Refining r.ooo 

Other small plants 500 

Pacific Coast (additional) 7,455 



Total 20,625 

This means that within a year's 
time the refineries of California 
will be consuming 7,528,125 bar- 
rels of petroleum yearly, which 
amount is nearly equal to the total 
amount of oil produced during 
1 901, and almost double the amount 
produced in 1900. 

Therefore, if we consider only 
the refining side of the California 
oil industry the prospect for the 
future is exceedingly bright. 

Deserves Great Credit- 

William Ellery and H. H. Blood 
were among the first to develop 
the Kern River district. 

Before hardly a rig was in the 
field or a barrel of oil had been 
taken from a well these gentlemen 
realized the future in store for the 
oil industry 'of Kern county and not 
only Invested their own money 
but induced others to invest and 
always to their satisfaction. 

At first prominently connected 
with the San Joaquin they after- 
wards organized the Sterling Oil 
company. When that was firmly 
established and several wells suc- 
cessfully drilled, they organized 
the Sovereign, and that now ranks 
among producing large companies. 

They have always operated in a 
conservative manner and have 
never attempted to place stock on 
the market by exaggeration or. by 
holding out false promises. 

They have also always refused 
to dispose of oil at less than 
a reasonable profit, and have 



never sacrificed the product of 
their wells in order to secure a few 
dollars for development work or 
to obtain money to pay for their 
rigs, etc. 

Financially their companies 
stand among the best in the field, 
and in organization and manage- 
serve as an example to other com- 
panies which are now organizing 
or may be organized. 

They have other companies un- 
der way and it is safe to assert 
that in everything they undertake 
in the oil business, Messrs El'ery 
and Blood will be uniformally 
successful. 



Well in Twenty Days. 

The workmen on the Red Bank 
holding, on section 4, 29 -28, are 
claiming the distinction of com- 
pleting a well in the shortest 
length of time heretofore reported 
in the local field, says the Cali- 
fornian. On November 22nd hole 
No. 9 was spudded in, and on 
December 12th the well was com- 
pleted and was producing oil in 
large quantities. Well No. 10 
will be begun at once, and upon 
its completion the next of the series 
of eight will be drilled. The com- 
pany expects to complete thirty 
wells in all before stopping de- 
velopment work. The large reser- 
voir nea? the wells is being con- 
structed this month. 



AMERICAN, 

STEEL AND WIRE CITY 



Pacific Works 

The only Wire Rope Factory on 
the Pacific Coast. 



We make 

Wire Ropes, Cable and Hawsers 

For all purposes and with 

every possible combination 

of Wires, steel and iron, 

galvanized or plain. 

♦ 
n 
n 
n 
n 
p 
a 
n 
n 
n 
n 
n 



i®&? 



Wire Ropes 
Of all Kinds 
For Oil Well . 
Purposes I 

a 
•&» a 

■*» s 

And all fixtures and appliances 
for the use of Wire Rope 



Send your orders to 

American Steel&Wire Co. 

LOS ANGELES— No. 206 North 

Los Angeles St. 
SAN FRANCISCO— No. 8 & 10 

Pine St. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NATURAL GAS. 



Vast Territory in This State Where It 
Exists Very Abundantly. 



Large Areas of The San Joaquin and Sacramento 

Valleys Should Yield Gas In Paying 

Quantities. 



A. S. COOPBR, K. VI. 

There are a Dumber of wells duct ion of natural gas, therefore 

yielding natural gas in California, the variableness In the composi 

In the most of these wells there is tioD of natural gas. 

no free gas. This is dearly shown The P resence of Kas is the cause 
...,., , . ..of spouting welts. If a well is 

by the fact that when the wells , . . * . , 

sunk into the top of a porous 

* to flow water the flow of gas str atnmcontaining free gas, the gas 

will escape but if the well pene- 
trates a porous stratum where the 
gas is in solution with the oil un- 



ceases. 

Water excites an attraction for 
gases. The absorbing power of dif- 
ferent liquids for different gases 
vary greatly. It is facilitated by 
low temperature and high pressure. 

Under one atmosphere one hun- 
dred volumes of water will absorb 
about four volumes of natural gas. 

When the water enters the bot- 
tom of the casing of a well the gas 
is in solution with the water, as 
the water ascends the well the 
pressure is decreased atfd the gas 
is liberated. 

The separation of natural gas 
from petroleum at ordinary tem- 
peratures is well-known. It is 
probable that at the present time 
petroleum is the primary, and gas 
secondary product, although at 
the time of its formation petro- 
leum vapors were the primary, 
and petroleum oil the secondary 
product. 

All hydrocarbons are volatile. 
Crude California oil when exposed 
to the atmosphere gradually evap- 
orates. Light hydrocarbons are 
constantly splitting off and the 
residue grows richer in carbon 
until finally the result is a hydro- 
carbon rich in carbon and aulphur. 
The oil becomes thick like molasses, 
then viscous, plastic, hard and 
finally brown and friable. 

The accompanying table shows 
that the natural gas in the differ- 
ent fields vary as to the percentage 
of the different gases present, al- 
though it usually contains the 
same gases in uncertain quantities. 
Analyses also show that the flow 
from the same well is subject to 
daily variations in composition. 

The presence of heavy hydro- 
carbons, (C 2 H 4), and light hy- 
drocarbons (C 6 H 6) in the Cali- 
fornia natural gas would indicate 
that they are derived from petro- 
leum oil, and are not from the 
decomposition of organic matter. 

Hydrogen, carbonic acid, car- 
bonic oxide, sulphureted hydrogen 
and oxygen have been introduced 
into the natural gas from ex- 
traneous sources by circulating 
water, or by chemical actions other 
than that necessary for the pro- 



der pressure, then a mixture of 
gas and oil will be thrown out of 
the well. This will continue un- 
til the gas pressure is exhausted, 
and the well will have to be 
pumped. 



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No. 1. From Minor's rancho, 
Contra Costa county, come through 
the sandstone in a small spring of 
water. From a hole five feet in 
diameter and six feet deep. 

No. 2. From a well 1300 feet 
deep from which water was flow- 
ing copiously on Minor's rancho, 
Contra Costa county. 

No. 3. Corner La Fayette and 
Lincoln streets, Stockton. 

No. 4. Shipyard well, Stockton. 

No. 5. North and Hunter 
streets, Stockton. 

No. 6. Jackson well, Hot Min- 
eral Baths, Stockton. 

No. 7. Greenwood well, Ameri- 



can and Miner avenues, Stockton. 
Orland. Tehama couoty. 

ground. 
No 10 

A 1] .tiling well ir in 

action to a bottle of champagne. 
When the twttlc is fusl opened, a 
mixture of gas and wine Is driven 
from the bottle; when the pn - 
of gas is 1 the wine has 

poured from the bottle. 
The temporary violent ll> 
water from some artesian wells 
may be an indication (hat the 
is impelled upwards by natur 1 
gas and that natural exists Borne 
where in the formation adjoining 
and lying above the water. 

Professor Orton says: "No 
stratum is known in the geologi 
cal scale that furnishes gas in a 
large amount which does not also 
in some part of its extent produce 
oil as well." Water that holds 
natural gas in solution must have 
come in contact with the gas during 
its subterranean flow. Geographi 
cal confirmation and geological 
structure would indicate that the 
water containing gas which is ob- 
tained at Sacramento comes from 
the north to the northeast of that 
city and that the water containing 
gas which is obtained at Stockton, 
comes from the south to the east 
of that city. The geologicalstruct. 
ure of the Sacramento and San 
Joaquin valleys makes it highly 
improbable that there is a subter. 
ranean flow of water from the 
Coast Range to these cities, conse- 
quently the source of these waters 
which have absorbed gases must 
lie towards the Sierra Nevada from 
those cities. An examination of 
the territory lying east of these 
cities may show a geological 
structure that would justify the 
drilling for oil. 

Below the line of permanent 
water the subterranean flow of 
water beneath the Sacramento 
and San Joaquin valleys must be 
exceedingly slow. Its retardation 
is sufficient to enable the obtain- 
ing of artesian water throughout 
the central part of the valleys. If 
the flow is feeble it can be under- 
stood that if the water is once 
impregnated with natural gas it 
may remain so for a long time, 
and by diffusion be constantly 
acquiring more until saturated or 
sufficient to replace that lost 
through the flow of water charged 
with gas from wells and springs. 
As will be seen by the analyses 
of the natural gases of California, 
they are largely made up of 
methane debased with nitrogen, a 
non-luminant. It is a good fuel 
gas but possesses no great value 
as an illuminant in its natural 
state. It can be converted into an 
excellent illuminant gas by pass- 
ing it through incandescent coal, 
decomposing it, carbon being de- 
posited on the coal and hydrogen 
liberated. The hydrogen is then 
mingled with the vapors of crude 
oil; this mixture is passed through 



1 per- 

. tude 

ting 

uatu: mtle 

light. 

simple m 
cenll- by which at a small 

10m the exist- 
ing wells in California can be 
largely increased. 

Large areas of tfa quin 

and Sacramento valleys should 
yield natural gas. A well can be 
drilled for about ten thousand 
dollars, which will yield from 30,- 
000 to 40,00 feet of gas per day, 
at the well ten cents net 
per thousand i g twenty 

percent intereston the Investment, 
This gas could be piped and used 
in other cities besides Stockton 
and Sacramento. 



The Berkeley Crude. 

Oil exists in Contra Costa county. 
Surface seepages are abundant. 
Oil sp'ings abound. Surface banks 
of sandstone can be found where 
a little digging wiih a spade will 
bring the oil trickling forth. The 
gas which rises in many places is 
of the sort that is found in locali- 
ties where there is oil. 

The surface oil which is so 
plentiful has a paraffine base. It 
is of the kind desired now above 
all things for refining. It is worth 
many times as much as the ordi- 
nary fuel oil having an asphaltum 
base. 

Where there is so much surface 
oil, there must be somewhere not 
far off the main body of oil from 
which this surface oil comes. 

A number of companies are now 
drilling in search of this main body 
of Contra Costa oil. Of these none 
stands a better show to discover 
the hidden treasure than the 
Berkeley Crude Oil company, now 
down about 1160 feet near Lafa- 
yette, and about nine miles from 
the bay shore; the railroad is only 
three miles away at Walnut Creek, 
while near by is the track of the 
California and Nevada narrow 
guage road. 

The land of the company con- 
sists of 144 acres and has been 
carefully examined by the best oil 
experts. It is believed oil will be 
found here in large quantities if a 
depth is reached, not to exceed 
2000 feet. 

The company has made record 
time, and, using a Star drilling 
machine, went down 500 feet in 
live weeks, with one driller and a 
toolie working single tour and 
dressing their own bits. 

The officers of the Berkeley 
Crude are B. F. Arnold, president; 
Seneca Gale, vice-president; Jos. 
M. Johnson, J. R. Little, Edward 
Mood, Dr. S. H. Frazier, D. B. 
Hunter; W. J. Mortimer of Berke- 
ley is secretary. No better 
managed or better officered com- 
pany is found in the state. 



V 



/ 



PACIFIC OIL, REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Published Weekly 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

(Indorsed By the California Petroleum 
Miners' Association. 



W B. WINN, Editor and Publisher 



Office akd Editorial Rooms 



318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



Telephone, Bush, 176 

TERMS 

Onb Year $250 

Six Months 1 50 

Three Months 1 00 

Sinole Copies 10c 

STRICTLY IN A.DV4NCE 



CALIFORNIA OIL FIELDS. 



Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or Regi stered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil Re- 
porter, 318 Pine street, San Francisco, rooms 
3I-33-33- Communications must be accompanied by 
writer's name ana address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 



Entered in the Postoffice at San Francisco, 
as second-class matter. 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 3, 1902 



All signs point to a prosperous 
year. Every in- 
Prosperous dustry in the 
Year Ahead state is flourish- 
ing, and the oil 
industry bids fair to rank second 
to none in importance and pros- 
perity by the close of 1902. Mil- 
lions of dollars are being spent 
for refineries, pipe lines and tank- 
age, and millions more for land 
and development work. More 
capital is being expended in the 
state today for oil than for mines, 
and in another year oil will bring 
more wealth to California than 
gold or silver mining. The oil 
industry has passed the experi- 
mental and speculative stage and 
is now on a solid, financial basis. 
In the certain belief that pros- 
perity awaits the oil industry the 
Pacific Oil Reporter extends 
its congratulations to its readers, 
and wishes all a Happy New 
Year. 



Vast Areas Still to Be Developed 
to Yield Illuminating Oils. 

(Col. M. M. Ogden, Field Expert of Producers' 
Oil Exchange.) 

The great bulk of the oils now 
being produced in California are 
found in vagrant water sands, 
clays and loose shales; not their 
original habitat or genetic environ- 
ment. This is graphically em- 
phasized by the conditions exist- 
ing in the Kern River field. Here 
the drill has tapped immense de- 
posits of petroleum ranging from 
14 degrees to 17 degrees Baume. 
These deposits, as a rule, have no 
pebbly, or shell conglomerate cap- 
pings to seal up the underlying 
strata, and retain the hydrogen in 
union with the carbon. The Kern 
River oil field is an immense reser- 
voir of heavy petroleum that has 
escaped from fixed sandstone 
strata, capped by pebbly and mar- 
ine fossiliferous conglomerates. 
In these pristine measures, from a 
petroliferous point of view, the 
immense accumulation of dynamic 
energy, as represented in great 
depositions of liquid hydro-car- 
bons in a highly volatile form, we 
find the cause of the characteristic 
local seismic disturbances peculiar 
to many sections in this state. 
These seismic movements have 
caused flexures or fissures in the 
impervious cappings of these 
lower porous sandstone measures 
and petroleum has been forced up 
into the loose sands, and other 
sedimentary depositions of the 
Kern River field and other dis- 
tricts With the process of time, 
and from the fact that overlying 
these loose sands, there is no cap- 
ping save disintegrated shales and 
blue clays, the hydrogen, or vola- 
tile element of petroleum has 
worked its way, through stress of 
inherent energy, to the surface as 
evidenced by the large number of 
" gas blow-outs" which we find in 
this, and other fields where like 
conditions have prevailed. 

The gradual loss of the hy- 
drogen elements of petroleum 
means a corresponding increase in 
its density. Petroleum ranges 
generally, irom carbon 72.6, hy- 
drogen 27.4 per cent, to carbon 85 
hydrogen 13 per cent. With the 
gradual loss of hydrogen of the 
petroleum of the Kern River field, 
due to the conditions above indi- 
cated, there can be no question 
that if these deposits of petroleum 
of great density had not been dis- 
turbed by the drill, in future ages 
this loss of hydrogen would have 
reduced the proportion by weight 
of these hydro-carbons to carbon 
80, hydrogen 5, oxygen, nitrogen, 



coke, ash, etc., 15 per cent, or 
coal. In other words, the Kern 
River oil field in ages to come 
would have developed into a coal 
field. 

In certain sections of California 
petroleum has been developed so 
volatile as to show 42 degrees 
Baume. No one can question the 
fact that we have produced a 
volatile petroleum with a parafEne 
base, in Moody's Gulch— an oil 
essentially different from the Kern 
River product; yet not a great 
distance therefrom, we find on 
the Sargent ranch seepages of 
petroleum showing the same char- 
acteristics of the oil of the Kern 
River field. The existence of 
these seepages of the heavier hy- 
dro-carbons in this locality must 
not be taken to mean that they 
preclude the development of the 
volatile hydro-carbons in the con- 
tiguous country, for I have found, 
outcroppings of the older rocks — 
fixed formations, in that .section 
that on development will un- 
questionably yield the lighter oils. 
But to find these lighter oils, 
cognizance should be taken of 
these outcroppings, the angle of 
inclination, etc., and well loca- 
tions made accordingly. The 
flexures, or fissures in the older 
rocks may be directly under the 
heavy hydro-carbon deposits in 
the loose sands, or may be some 
distance away laterally, for the 
flexures are caused by the press- 
ure of the dynamic energy of the 
hydrogen against the plane of 
least resistance. In view of the 
disturbed conditions, restricted 
loose sand areas contemporary 
with the depositions in the Kern 
River district, in what may be 
designated as the Sargent Ranch 
district, I would not look for large 
deposits of the heavier hydro- 
carbons there, but by following 
the rock testimony locate wells to 
develop petroleum as volatile as 
that found in Moody's gulch, as 
well as possessing the same chemi- 
cal characteristics. That wells so 
located in this district will bt 
most prolific yielders I am fully 
convinced, from the strenuous 
activity of the hydrogen in the 
underlying measures, as con- 
stantly manifested at the surface. 
In the development of our Cali- 
fornia oil fields the fact that the 
seepages from the loosely capped 
Tertiary sands of heavy asphaltic 
oils are so much in evidence, has 
been largely a guide to drilling 
operations. Surface indications 
in the nature of seepages of ex- 
ceedingly volatile petroleum, of a 
paraffine base, are not only more 
unusual, by reason of the capping 
conditions heretofore explained, 



but are likewise more difficult for 
the inexperienced to identify. 
That such surface indications do 
exist of the more volatile oils, 
there can be no gainsaying. I 
have found them from the desert 
country in San Diego county, to 
the Columbia river section in Ore- 
gon. It is in these old fixed sand- 
stone measures, of which we find 
ideal outcroppings in Butte county, 
and elsewhere in the great valleys, 
in the line of foothills, that the 
drillers of the Pacific Coast will 
find the immense oil fields of the 
future — fields I am convinced by 
practical investigation will yield 
us petroleum that by reason of its 
great per cent of illuminants, will 
equal the best- certificate oil of 
Pennsylvania, and in more gen- 
erous quantities than the keystone 
state has yielded them, by reason 
of greater areas of available terri- 
tory. 

The peculiar stratigraphical 
conditions existing in the two im- 
mense valleys which extend 
through the state of California 
from north to south, rimmed by 
the Sierras and the Coast ranges, 
assure us for all time, a never 
failing supply of the heavier as- 
phaltic oils for fuel purposes. 
These valleys, underlaid by im- 
mense depositions of loosely joined 
Tertiary sands, are repositories of 
the heavier hydro-carbons, exist- 
ing under the same conditions 
outlined in the first paragraph of 
this article, relating to the oil 
fields of the Kern Kiver district. 
Under them are the fixed sand- 
stone measures, perfectly capped 
as a rule, and containing the more 
volatile oils. 

Our fuel oils contain much less 
sulphur and are generally more 
accessible than the fuel oils of 
Texas, for while we are developing 
larger continuous areas of fuel oil 
yielding territory, the Texas field 
as yet is confined to the circum- 
scribed Spindletop, for I- consider 
Spindletop to be the peak of a 
Tertiary island, rising abruptly 
from the great deeps of a recent 
sedimentary sea. 



Understands Oil Law. 

The California Petroleum Miners' As- 
sociation in its two years experiences has 
had to deal with a great many matters in- 
volving important questions, such as 
titles, leases, scrippers' contentions, etc* 

In all these matters the Association 
has relied very largely on the opinion of 
its attorney, Mr. Edward H. Stearns, and 
in every instance his conclusions have 
been found to be correct. 

Mr. Stearns is himself largely inter- 
ested in oil, being connected with several 
important oil companies as stockholder 
and director. 

He is a general practitioner of high 
repute, and has ofEces in the Crocker 
building. His portrait is in the group 
in the supplement. 



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R. H. HERRON CO. 

411 Market Street, San Francisco 

Oil Well Supplies, Tools, Casing* Etc. 



A POINTER FOR OIL MEN. 

SPINDLE TOP LEASE, Dec. 30, 1901. 
FRIEND TOM: As you are to take charge of the Hard Luck Oil Co.'s operations I ventnre to "give you a pointer". I think 
somebody once said, "Man wants but little here below, but an oil man wants it right and quick." First of all you will want to use 
the Oil Well Supply Company's tools, as their joints will "go up" and they are made to suit the California Drilling. A large dome 
boiler is the only style that gives entire satisfaction in this country. Concerning Reading Casing, Supplies and Fishing Tools, as 
well, advise you to go to Herron's. Your friend, HENRY. 



wmm^ 

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PACIFIC Oil. RKPORTKR 



OIL BURNING ENGINES. 

Immense Amount of Liquid Fuel Consumed 
• By the Railroads. 

The Southern Pacific and Santa Fe Systems Will 

Consume Nearly All the Oil Now Belnfi 

Produced. 



on per cngi 



nt more oil 
col m California than is being 
due to the tact that produc- 
tion 
consumption, this condition el attain is 

is shown that the new 
refine- ructetl will 

have a capacity equal to the present 
productiveness of the various California 
oil fields. 

In addition to the refineries should he 
lered the rapnllv increasing con- 
sumption of the railroads. 

It has been demonstrated that fuel oil 
is superior la coal as fuel for locomotives 
both on account of economy as well ns 
general utility. 

This w;is recently proved by a com- 
parative test of oil and coal as fuel for 
locomotives made bv the International 
and Great Northern Railway. 

The company took two of its ten-wheel, 



coal in the engine tender was rr. - 
at |4 *, |>er ton and that of fuel oil in 
the tender at "about i% cents |>er gal- 
lon," which would be i>4.5cent- per Imr 
rel. Hew if any other l»rc. 
Steam-powef in California can g. ■: 
as cheap as that, jet here is a declared 
ly of twenty percent with coal at 
only I4 jo. 

The estimated cost of fitting up an 
engine for fuel oil is but fj-'S. This in- 
cludes tanks, brick work, etc., in the 
furnace, labor, burners, etc. Id the splen- 
did engine that liauls the Owl the oil is 
carried in two tanks set in the coal space 
in the tender, c Inc is 10X160x104 inches 
and the other 52x64 xoN inches. The 
total capacity is 2 200 gallons, or about 
fifty-two lurrcls. Kern River oil is used 
and the fluidity of this heavy oil is in- 
creased by heating it to 150 degrees by 
turning steam directly iuto the oil in the 
tanks. It is stated that this practice, 



,,,c - now consume on that 

barrels per 

tie-half the 

" ut rill he 

added to the list of oil l.uriicrs thl 
which will put the nil im- 
the engines up to the sum of 4.500000 
barrels at least. 

I the 
ed h> the 

their ferryboats. The Piedmont, the 

1 the licet to be i banged, has a 
tank uipm it j of 8,000 gallons Shi 
Minn- mi .in avenge 3,500 gallons, 

ferryboats and freight 
changed within ihe next few um ■ 
the experiments thus far made with the 
Piedmont, Solano, Thorough fan 
have proved very satisfactory, 

This means that Hum boats alone will I 
consume 36^540 barrels a year, an amount 
equal to the entire production of tru- 
st. itc 111 |S<)2. 

l-'ii. in the foregoing it can readily be 
adduced that the railroad ci mpanii 
and will be still greater factors in 
sumption. The nil production of tin 
Which now seems large hut which will 
be seen to be none too large to supply 
the demand which will be made upon it. 



'. almost all the 

b, in that 1 

In San Pi ne there an 

and the number is increasing almost 
daily. 

The railroad com pan} is 
unable to furnish 

rith the demand, and wi 
not for the large number of privat) 

.1 Oil Company 
large consumers would find it irupo 

tain enough oil to continue running 

their plants continuously. 

Two years ago there were not to am 
25 oil- Im ruing plants north of Tebacbapi. 
there are at least 500, snd this 
number will he mora than doubled ba- 
ts of 1902. 

Successful Operator. 

F. J. Carmen. President of the 
Grace Oil company, and the resi- 
dent and active member of the 
firm of Newton, Carmen & Somes, 
is one of the leading oil men in the 
Kern River district. The Grace 
Oil company ranks as one of the 
best in the district, and the com. 




ONE OF THE LARGE OIL BURNING ENGINES OF THE SOUTHERN PACIFIC COMPANY TAKING ON Oil, IN THE WEST OAKLAND YARDS. 



eighty-three-ton (on drivers) engines, 
used exclusively in the freight service, 
and operated from them on the Houstan- 
Palestine division, 150 miles in length, 
giving each engine exactly the same 
number of cars and the same tonnage 
for each trip, as near as was practicable; 
they were further operated on similar 
conditions in every respect. The coal 
burner, engine No. 206, was equipped 
with every known improvement for 
burning coal economically, such as 
patent fire doors, etc. Both engines dur- 
ing the test made 3,322 miles. Engine 
No. 206, burning coal, consumed 182 
tons, at the cost of I2.71 cents per ton, or 
a cost per mile of 14.87 cents; miles run 
per ton of coal, 18.22. Engine 215, of 
the same pattern and weight exactly, 
running on oil, made the same mileage, 
consuming 705 barrels of oil, at a cost 
of 54J4; cents per barrel (this is the 
grand cost including handling, storage, 
etc,), or, say, 11.63 cents per mile; miles 
run per barrel, 4.71. It will be seen 
that the difference in favor of oil is 21.8 
per cent. One hundred mile run on 
coal cost $14.87 cents, while a similar 
run on coal cost f 11.63 cents, or a saving 
fo $3 24 cents per 100 miles. 

Experiments like the above deter- 
mined the Southern Pacific and the 
Santa Fe to use oil instead of coal, and 
for the last year the engines have been 
changed as fast as possible to use the 
new fuel, until now the best passenger 
trains of both roads are drawn by smoke- 
less locomotives, and these oil burning 
steeds are among the finest passenger 
engines in the service. 

Assistant Master Mechanic W. H. 
Russel states that it is safe to say the fuel 
economy in these engines was twenty 
per cent For this estimate the cost of 



instead of -the more usual one of passing 
the steam through a coil of pipe, is 
wholly satisfactory and the resulting 
water makes no trouble. 

During a month's run one engine run- 
ning the Owl between Mendota and Oak- 
land averaged 13.48 miles per 100 gal- 
lons of fuel oil. Another engine aver- 
aged 13.03 miles per 100 gallons. On 
such fast runs 13.5 gallons per 100 miles 
may be assumed as a working figure. 
The Owl engine makes the trip from 
Oakland to Mendota and back daily, a 
total service of 348 miles, and on the 
basis named this engine uses 2,355 gal- 
lons or fifty-six barrels daily — 1,680 bar- 
rels per month or 20,160 barrels per 
year. That would run quite a manu- 
facturing plant. A gallon of oil will 
take the heavy Owl train 720 feet and to 
take it a mile costs seven and one-third 
gallons. It requires eighty-five barrels 
to take the Owl from San Francisco to 
Los Angeles—if the Tehachapi climb is 
ignored in the calculation. 

In the Pacific system of the Southern 
Pacific company there are 850 engines. 
Of these 150 are now burning oil, and 
others are being changed from coal to 
oil burners as rapidly as possible. So 
that in a year nearly every engine on 
the system will be burning oil. 

The Santa Fe is now burning oil on 
nearly all its passenger engines as far 
east as Winslow, Arizona, and is chang- 
ing its freight engines as fast as pos- 
sible. It has now 240 engines burning 
oil. . , 

Now let us see what this means in the 
way of consumption. 

There are now 150 engines of the 
Southern Pacific company and 240 of 
the Santa Fe, or 390 in all, burning oil. 

On the low basis that these engines 



OIL FOR ROADS. 



Crude Petroleum Now Used as a 
Preserver of Highways. 

A use to which crude oil will be more 
and more generally put is in the making 
and preserving of roads. 

Experiment , has proved that oil put 
upon roads in a certain manner will result 
in putting and keeping in good condition 
a road that otherwise would be well- 
nigh impassable. 

At least a dozen counties in the state 
are now using oil for this purpose, and 
the result is entirely satisfactory, an 
otherwise soft and rutty road being 
made as hard and smooth as if covered 
wilh asphalt or bitumen, and the bills 
against the county for load work and 
repairs being reduced to a minimum. 

In no instance where the experiment 
has been properly tried has it proved a 
failure. On the other hand in every 
county where a smail piece of road has 
been treated with oil as a trial the result 
has been so satisfactory the supervisors 
have contracted to have larger stretches 
of road treated, and in time Califo-nia 
highways will generally be in perfects 
condition, due to the wise use of crude 
petroleum. 

Oil in General Use. 



The Liquid Fuel Rapidly Growing 
in Favor. 

Everyone knows that the high price 
of fuel has hindered the growth of our 
manufacturing industries and greatly 
lessened the prosperity of the state. 

It is gratifying to know that manu- 



pany has 240 acres in 8, 29-28, one 
of the best oil sections in the field. 

Mr. Carmen is not a novice in 
the oil business, and his California 
oil experiences are not his first in 
that line. 

Some years ago he operated very 
successfully in the Petrolia, 
Canada, oil field, where he still 
retains important interests; and 
afterwards operated in Dakota and 
in Wyoming. 

Mr. Carmen is a graduate of 
Lehigh University, and is a 
thorough chemist. For some time 
he was connected with the Stand- 
ard oil company in making tests 
of refining oil. 

Ihe success which has attended 
him elsewhere has followed him 
here, and he is ranked as one of 
the most reliable and skillful 
operators in the state. 



^^ To Capitalists. 

An oil company having on its 
land a new Standard rig and ap- 
purtenances, and a well partly 
completed, with oil in the hole, 
would like to communicate with a 
company having sure capital on 
hand with a view to consolidation 
on terms agreeable to both com- 
panies. Address, P. O., Box 416, 
Grass Valley, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



EARLY OIL HISTORY. 



The Story of the First Attempts to Obtain 
Oil in California. 



A Story of Discouragements and Triumphs— How the 

Pacific Coast Oil Company Came to Be Formed. 

The Old Oil Guard of Ventura. 



Ventura county is about the 
oldest, if not the oldest, county in 
the state so far as California's oil 
industry is concerned. 

Here were drilled the first wells, 
some of which are yet yielding 
oil, and this oil still continues to 
rank as high as any in the state. 

Ventura county is one of the 
few counties where is found illu- 
minating oil in commercial quan- 
tities and of a quality that yields 
a high per cent of illuminant. 

Mr. R. McPherson, whose pho- 
tograph appears among the group 
on the seventh page of this issue, 
was one of the first to success- 
fully drill a well in Ventura 
county, and he was one of the 
founders of the Pacific Coast Oil 
Company, that is now practically 
absorbed by the Standard Oil 
Company. 

Mr. McPherson was formerly a 
prominent oil operator in Venango 
county, Pennsylvania, where he 
owned and drilled wells from 1861 
to 1872. 

A gentleman well acquainted 
with the oil possibilities ol Cali- 
fornia advised Mr. McPherson to 
come to this state on account of 
the opportunities presented for 
developing what he believed would 
prove to be vast and exceedingly 
profitable oil fields, especially in 
Los Angeles, Ventura and Santa 
B irbira counties. 

Mr. McPherson took his advice, 
came to California, looked around 
to see what oil possibilities there 
were, and decided to commence 
operations in Pico canyon, buying 
200 acres of what he considered 
good oil land. 

. Having bought the land, the 
next thing was to incorporate a 
company, and he went to Los An- 
geles for that purpose; but after 
trying assiduously for several 
weeks and meeting with no en- 
couragement, he came to San 
Francisco, where for six months 
he did his level best to interest 
capital, but to no purpose. Men 
with money could not be made to 
believe that there was any oil in 
Pico or in any other canyon. 

Disgusted with California Mr. 
McPherson started east and in a 
few months returned with a com- 
plete rig, which cost $6000 laid 
down in Pico canyon. From San 
Francisco it was shipped to San 
Pedro, then to San Fernando, and 
thence was hauled over the moun- 
tains to the canyon. 

This was the first real drilling 
outfit in this region. To be sure 



there was one company trying to 
operate with a spring pole, and 
they succeeded in getting a light 
oil at 150 feet. 

Mr. McPherson came to the city 
and on December 5, '75, almost 
thirty years ago organized the 
San Francisco Petroleum Com- 
pany, composed of Lou Goodwin, 
Charlie Hosmerand Grove Adams; 
Wendell Easton, now the success- 
ful real estate man, as well as oil 
operator, was secretary of the 
company, and it was in '75 that 
Wendell Easton contracted the oil 
disease which broke out so vio- 
lently two years ago or more. Mr. 
McPherson owned the controlling 
interest in, the company. 

About this time D. C. Scott in- 
terested F. B. Taylor in a company 
known as the California Star 
Company, 

Mr. McPherson drilled three 
good wells in Pico canyon, and in 
1877 interested Senator Charles 
N. Felton in the San Francisco 
Petroleum Company, and sub- 
sequently Mr. Felton interested 
Lloyd Tevis. 

These gentlemen in 1878 organ- 
ized the Pacific Coast Oil Com- 
pany, and in the following year 
built the Alameda refinery, which 
in subsequent years has made vast 
fortunes for its'owners, and which 
is now the California branch of the 
greatest and richest corporation in 
the world — the Standard Oil Com- 
pany. 

Mr. McPherson brought into the 
Pico district its first rig, and inter- 
ested in his company the men 
whose capital made his enterprise 
a success and proved the truth of 
his judgment. 

The following letter, written 
from New York on October 31, 
1879, shows how Mr. McPherson's 
judgment was regarded by Sena- 
tor Felton: 



ests in this enterprise, as did also 
Senator Felton and Lloyd Tevis. 
Isaac E. Blake, at present con- 
nected with the United Oil Pro- 
ducers was also in the business. 

Perhaps the only man who was 
far-sighted enough to see what 
lay in store for those who would 
continue in the oil-refining busi- 
ness was D. G. Scofield, vice- 
president of the Pacific Coast Oil 
company, which, as has been said 
before, is now a part of the Stand- 
ard Oil monopoly, and profits by 
its abundant capital. The old 
Alameda refinery moved quietly 
on its way until swallowed up by 
the Standard. It will soon be a 
thing of the past, but on Point 
Richmond the Pacific Coast Oil 
company will have a plant that 
will, 'ere long, vie in capacity 
with the largest of the Eastern 
refineries. 

Of the old oil guard, Scofield, 
McPherson, Felton, Tevis, and 
the rest, only Scofield remains in 
the refinery. Tevis is dead, Fel- 
ton is almost entirely out of oil, 
Uncle Isaac Blake is still dabbling 
in oil but has nothing to do with 
the refinery. McPherson, when 
he sold out his interest in the re- 
j finery still continued hunting for 
Oil oil. 

He drilled in Moody Gulch in 
Santa Clara county, and on the 
Main ranch in Santa Cruz, where 
a false report was recently started 
of a 400-barrel well. He drilled 
in San Bernardino, on the Chino 
ranch. He has land now near the 
old Mission San Juan in San 
Benito county, and will commence 
drilling there in February. He is 
now interested in a well in Santa 
Cruz county which is down about 
900 feet, and which is expected to 
be drilled to a depth of 1,200 feet. 
He has land in Fullerton and else- 
where. In fact Mr. McPherson is 
one of very few of those left who 
helped drill the first oil wells in 
California, and to his persistance, 
enterprise and success in enlisting 
capital in drilling oil wells and in 
refining oil is due largely the 
prosperity and magnitude of the 
oil industry of today. 



New York, October 3r, '79. 

My Dear Mc— Your favors duly re- 
ceived as well as those from Scofield. I 
am very much pleased at results, aside 
from any interest I may have of a pe- 
cuniary nature. 

In as much as it has proven the cor- 
rectness of your views and value as an 
"oil sharp" and of my opinions de- 
rived from yours. 

All now can move on rapidly and no 
falling down. If well managed it will 
turn out large money. 

This is now no "child's play." Not 
only will those interested make money, 
but you will find, as I have before told 
you, that you will do well and not regret 
leaving Newhall, or remaining there in- 
stead of coming here. 

I will leave here on the 3rd inst. for 
home, and will soon see and congratulate 
you and the others in person. 

Remember me kindly to your family. 
Yours truly, 

C. N. Fet/Ton. 

Thinking to better himself Mr. 
McPherson parted with his inter- 



Making a Success. 

"Nothing succeeds likes success," 
is a true adage. Of the companies 
that are making a success none 
deserves more credit than the 
Standard Rock Oil. 

This company has land in some 
of the proven oil belts in the state, 
notably McKittrick. Instead, how- 
ever, of expending several thous- 
and dollars in sinking an oil well 
and obtaining oil for which at 
present there is no desirable mar- 
ket owing to an over-supply, the 
Standard Rock Oil obtained from 
the City Street Improvement com- 
pany a lease of 6,000 acres of land 
near Sargent's Station, about nine 
miles south of Gilroy, on which are 
marvellously rich and large de- 
posits of asphaltum. This lease 
was obtained only a few weeks 



ago. At once the company erected 
houses for its men, put in place 
immense stills for refining the 
crude asphalt, and they are now 
making regular shipments of 
asphalt, both refirfed and crude, 
both products being in demand, 
and yielding a most satisfactory 
return to the company. Within a 
very short time the company will 
be in a position to commence the 
payment of dividends to its stock- 
holders, and this will be done 
without the expensive purchase 
of a rig, or the drilling of a well. 

It is expected to refine 40 barrels 
daily which, after all expenses of 
manufacture, freight, etc., are paid 
will yield a profit of a little over 
$10 a ton. 

The credit of this enterprise 
largely should be given to Major 
F. A. Falkenburg, president of the 
Standard Rock Oil Company, whose 
portrait appears in the group on 
the ninth pageof this issue. 



NED FAY 



E. J. FOSTER 

Formerly of Cliff House 



Grand 

Hotel 

Cafe... 



New Montgomery Street 

San Francisco 



Foster & Fay 



W. A. KIDD 



M. H. MURRAY 



MURRAYKIDD 

DRILLING CO. 

Contract to Drill Oil and Water Wells 

and Build Rigs and Pumping Plants 



Furnish Estimates on Everything 
Used Around Oil Weils 



EXPERIENCED MEN TO 
OPERATE FISHING TOOLS 



Office in Southern Hotel, 
P. O. Box 654, 



Bakersfield, Cal. 

Box 369. SANTA CRUZ, CAL. 



Annual Meeting. 

Notice is hereby given that the annual meeting 
of the Commonwealth Oil company will be held 
in the office of the company, 710 Market street, 
San Francisco, Cal., on Tuesday, January 7, 1902, 
at 2 o'clock p. m , for the purpose of electing a 
Boaid of Directors to serve for the ensuing year, 
and the transaction of such ther busin ss as 
may prop«rly come before the meetioge The 
books of the company will be closed on . Satur- 
day, January 4, 1902. 

Charles Conexin, Secretary. 

San Francisco, December 26, 1901. 



PACIFIC OIL RRPORTKR 



VERY GOOD SHOWING. 



M 



Trade in Oil Stocks This Year Better Than 
Last Notwithstanding the Low 
Price of Oil. 



























In spite of the fact that oil has not reached a satisfactory price, 
and that the "knocker '* has been abroad in the land, trade in oil 
stocks on the floor of the Producers' Oil Kxcliangc has been belter 
this year than last. 

From March 23. 1900, when the two exchanges cons lidated, to 
December 14. 1900. the sales of stock amounted t< 5 49- 

During the same period this year the amount of sales was 
$1.4*7.414.12 

Although the price obtained per share this year was less than 
last, this is accounted for largely by the fact that several new com- 
panies weie placed on the market, and the stock was offered at a 
very low figure. 

On the whole, considering the condition of the oil business 
generally the showing of the year that has passed is exceedingly 
satisfactory. 

The following figures are absolutely correct, and are an evidence 
of the care taken by the Pacific Oil. Reporter in collating exact 
statistical news: 

FROM MARCH 23, I900, To DECEMBER 14, 1900. 

WEEKLY TOTALS MONTHLY TOTALS 

Shares Amouut Shares Aniouut 



March 23 . 
30 



.i860 $ 2,125.25. 

.8331 12,601.75 



'10,191 f 14,727.00 



April 6 6365 6,65425. 

13 8810 15,639.50. 

" 20 9600 1(1,468.25. 

" 27 5433 11,13933- 

May 4 5285 21,438.05 

n 2022 7,796.60. 

18 3330 6,737.50. 

" 25 6535 16,107.75. 



30.25S 49.9°'-33 



17,172 5 2 .079-90 



June 1 4106 11,32772 

" 8 4801 14,408.58 

" 15 2605 13,811.75 14,9" 65,798.05 

•' 22 3810 16,012.75 

" 29 3590 10,237.25 

July 6 2137 6,376.93 

" 13 4485 8,525.50 

" 20 10,490 6,303.00 

July 27 7155 2,470.50 

Aug. 3 3540 3,89362 

10 7245 10,341.00 

" 17 8355 6,053.00 38,510 53,66262 

" 24 5550 16,47250 

• 31 13,820 16,902.50 



24,267 23,675.93 



Sept. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



80,640. 



136,820.12 



95,048... 177,943.13 



7 22,794 29,013.10 

14 12,585 26,799-97 

21 15,026 37,612.25 

28 30,235 43,394-8o 

5 16,255 31,256-80 

12 17,075 38,024.26 

19 29,475 46,78777 

26 32,273 61,874.30 

2 44,198 54,811.00 

Q 34,502 55,846.70 

X 6 33.200 49,761.62 269,680 27S.919.41 

23.. 96,740 73,200.74 

■ • 45,299-35 



30 61,040 

7 105,196 61,538.49 • 

14 121,770 69,67951. 



226,966 I3I.21S.OO 

Total for nine months 807,644 



l984,745-4 



FROM MARCH 22, I90I, TO DECEMBER 13, I901. 
Shares Amount Shares 



.209,322. 
- 139.787 ■ 



. $jo8, 728-52 'A- 
. 94,328.54... 



'349> io 9- 



•458,147. 



Mar. 22.. 
" 29.. 

Apl. 5 137,524 9 I .354-50-- 

" 12 122,454 65,082.50.. 

" 19 109,935 56,605.02^ 

" 26 88,234 68,950.00 

May 3 120,643^ 68,894-72^ 

•• 10 84.313 48,604.31 491,904)4, 

" 17 117.157 48,360.35 

" 24 94,758 36,918:03 

" 31 75,033 40,613.89 

June 7 64,010 20,069.17... 

" 14 92,561 38,460.04... 

" 21 76,984 34,525-4i. ■■ 

" 28 49,805 31,85282,":!. 

July 5 29,801 21,363. 32K- 

" 12 22,231 10,883. 75-- 

" 19 39,178 24.930.98-- 

•■ 26 20,831 13,838.25-.- 



Amount 
• I203.057.06K 

. 281,992.02 y z 
■ 243,391-30^ 



•283,360 124,907.44^ 



•112,041 71.016.30j4 



•3 



Oct. 






Dec, 






- 









1 
«5- 



S3,l8a ■ 



13 ,. 
Tot.I for nine niniiths 



■ 

I05.I 





'-'."H n 

■5 



90.575- 






.'...5 '.'■«>■, J I 



POTOMAC OIL COMPANY 



Potomac Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



-REVIEMBER- 

The Potomac has a producing plant in the Kern River field. 
The Potomac has a producing plant in the Los Angeles field. 
The Potomac has a producing plant in the Summerland field. 
The Potomac has twenty-seven wells producing oil. 
The Potomac owns its properties and has no debts. 
The Potomac has an annual capacity of 360,000 barrels. 
The Potomac has an annual contract for 180,000 barrels. 
The Potomac has skilled operators drilling night and day. 
The Potomac has the very best of management. 
The Potomac has the finest equipment. 
The Potomac will soon double its production. 

The Potomac has the endorsement of bankers, manufacturers, mer- 
chants and investors generally. 
The Potomac is selling a small block of stock at 50 cents. 

MORE INFORMATION FOR THE ASKING. 

ADDRESS 

POTOMAC OIL COMPANY 

Potomac Building, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Fishing Tools.... 

When you are sick call a physician. 

When you have a lost tool iu the hole call the practical fishing tool men. 

We are the oil men's doctors. 






We Have the Largest Supply of Fishing 
Tools in California for Rent 



• • • • 



PENNSYLVANIA DRILLING COMPANY 

Phone Black 1071, BAKERSFIELD, CAL 




Business College and 
School of Engineering 



24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

THE CIVIL ENGINEERING COURSE includes Geomelry, Trigonometry, Draughting 
Strength of Matenals. and Surveying. 

THB MINING ENGINEERING COURSE includes Assaying, Blow Pipe Analysis, Mill Con- 
struction, Milling. Mining. Geology, Mineralogy, Economic Geology, Surveying and Mathematics. 

ELECTRICAL AND ENGINEERING COURSE Electrical Engineering, Theoretical and 
Practical, Work Shop and Laboratory Practice Construction. Mechanical Drawing, Mathematics, etc. 

THB COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT of this College affords unexcelled opportunities for 
the acquisition of a business education. Day and Evening Classes. 

8ST Write lor new 80-page Catalogue and College Journal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



PETROLEUM AND ASPHALT. 



A Wonderful Deposit Soon to Be Developed 
Near Santa Barbara. 



The Columbia Oil Company Will Commence Active De> 

velopment Work on the Coast Near the Summer= 

land Submarine Oil Wells. 



Perhaps no region of the earth 
possesses greater deposits of as- 
phaltum and bitumen, than the 
county of Santa Barbara, in this 
state, not even excepting the Is- 
land of Trinidad, 

These deposits which are prac- 
tically the condensed seepage of 
petroleum oils are found in some 
localities in the county in masses 
of millions of tons. 

One of the richest and most in- 
teresting of these localities is that 
extending from Carpenteria creek 
where it empties into the channel 
for a mile to the southeast. The 
center of this tract is taken up by 
the lemon ranch of Mr. P. C. 
Higgins, lately leased by the Col- 
umbian Oil Asphalt and Refining 
company. 

This remarkable section of 
ground, while having a rich, sandy- 
loam above, immediately beneath 
has a stratum fifteen to sixteen 
feet thick, of asphalt rock, such 
as is used for the city street pave- 
ment, and beneath this, has a 
whitish shale more than 300 feet 
in thickness, through every seam 
and stratum of which oozes a pure 
liquid asphalt, almost a perfectly 
pure hydrocarbon. This again 
must have been forced up from 
profound depths, where rest the 
beds of petroleum oil. 

The greater portion of the Hig- 
gins tract is now bearing a fine 
growth of lemon, orange and wal- 
nut trees, but whenever the plow, 
in cultivating these trees, pene- 
trrates a little deeper than usual, 
it turns up the solid asphalt, and 
a number of shallow wells sunk 
through this stratified asphalt 
have pierced the shale beneath, 
and immediately filled up with a 
pure liquid bitumen. 

Herewith is a description of this 



very remarkable tract, given by 
C. W. Ayers, Oil Expert: 

The land known as the "Higgins tract" 
is situated about one-half mile from the 
town of Carpenteria, Santa Barbara 
county, California, and has a frontage on 
the Pacific Ocean of about one-half mile. 

The tracks of the Southern Pacific 
Railroad cross it about 300 yards from 
the shore line. 

Carpenteria Station is about three- 



most wonderful prolific piece of asphal- 
tum land in the State of California, and 
is remarkable for the purity of the 
material and the great quantities that 
can be seen oozing out on the surface, 
forced up through the cracks and seams 
of the surface rocks from the great mass 
and deposit underlying them. 

In my examination of this land I found 
many places on the surface where small 
holes had been found and in which the 
pure liquid asphaltum had gathered in 
pools containing from a bucketful to 
several barrels. 

Among the bluffs bordering on the 
ocean, where the rocks and formations 
are clearly exposed to depths of 40 to 80 
feet, small streams of the pure liquid 
flow down the face and mingle with the 
sands of the beach forming large masses 
and deposits of bituminous rock in a 
semi-solidified state. 

The formations are here clearly shown, 
with the anticlinal folds of the Tertiary 
shales, overlaid by masses of sandstone 
conglomerates. Interpersed through the 
folds are small seams of heavily charged 




Mr. Higgins dipping liquid asphalt, which flows from a well 260 feet deep on the Higgins 
tract, Carpenteria, Santa Barbara county, Cal. BO 



quarters of a mile west, and is the 
present shipping point for all inland 
markets. 

The Carpenteria wharf, at which ocean 
steamers and vessels land their cargoes 
and take on freight is about one and one- 
half mile west of the railroad station 
and is reached by both the railroad and 
county wagon road. 

The shipping facilities are unsur- 
passed and afford an easy and cheap 
method of reaching the markets of the 
world. 

The Higgins land is noted as being the 




oil sands, which easily account for the 
numerous seepages found on the surface. 

These small seams of sand are the 
arteries leading to and from a large main 
stratum farther down and from which 
they draw the oils and gases that in turn 
form the liquid asphalt. 

At the western edge of the land, and 
j ust above the beach a small well was 
bored to a depth of 260 feet, that now 
flows an intermittent stream of liquid 
asphalt, forced up by the heavy gas 
pressure. 

The accompanying photo shows the 
asphaltum streaming down the bank and 






Sea front of Higgins iract leased by Columbian Oil, Asphalt and Refining Company showine 
15 feet of asphalt rock capping shale 300 feet thick containing liauid asrSialt snJwnJ1 " 



thick containing liquid asphalt. 



piling up on the beach sand in great 
quantities. Just above this well and 
about 60 feet away a small tunnel was 
run in the bank about 40 feet long and 
more than 200 barrels of pure liquid 
asphaltum was taken. 

About too feet to the east of the well, 
a shaft was sunk 350 feet deep and four 
feet square. There is now standing in 
this shaft 200 feet of liquid asphaltum. 
This shaft was dug in an effort to pene- 
trate through the shale rock and reach 
the sand beneath, but could not be dug 
any deeper on account of the flowing in 
of liquid asphaltum and the danger of 
explosion of gas. The hole is entirely in 
shale formation, and an idea of the rich- 
ness of the sands beneath may be ob- 
tained by observing the great quantity 
that seeped into the hole through the 
cracks in the shale rock. Gas pressure 
is so strong behind it that it bubbled and 
popped as the rock was broken and 
cracked by blows of the pick and 
hammer. Openings have been made 
on other parts of the land and in all 
cases the same conditions were en- 
countered. Near the county road at the 
northern end of the property, there is a 
hole 50 feet deep and 6 feet in diameter. 
A large caisson was sunk in it to cut out 
surface water, and it has filled to within 
20 feet of the top with liquid asphaltum, 
and it may be dipped out with a bucket. 

At this point a s ratum of sand was 
struck at 25 feet from the surface and 
the caisson was sunk another 25 feet 
down in it. The opening is fully 2500 
feet away from the shaft and opening at 
the beach, and proves the entire tract to 
be underlaid with the deposit of oil 
producing sand. 

For a number of years this liquid as- 
phaltum (or low gravity oil) has been 
flowing out to the surface through the 
rocks beneath. Near the ocean edge the 
beach sands have blown and washed into 
it until it has formed great beds of satu- 
rated sand averaging from 6 to 9 feet in 
depth over considerable of the land. 
This material called bituminous rock was 
used in its natural state for street paving 
and many tons shipped away for this 
purpose. 

A large lefiuerv was also built for the 
purpose of extracting the liquid asphal- 
tum from the sand. More than 150,000 
tons was thus treated, and yielded 
material that marketed for $25 per ton. 
This amount was taken from not more 
than three acres of ground where on the 
sand deposit averaged nine feet deep. 
At the time this work was done it was 
not understood that the pure liquid could 
be had by boring wells, or otherwise 
making openings in the ground to the 
source of supply beneath and thus ob- 
taining greater quantities at less expense. 

On the Higgins tract there is about 
ten acres of land covered with this 
saturated sand, or bituminous rock, 
which would produce many thousands 
of tons of pure asphaltum worth from 
J25 to {36 per ton. To me, however, the 
material is more valuable as a proof posi- 




Messrs. Scupham and Allen dipping liquid asphaltum from an old excavation on Higgins tract. 



that proper openii . 
the overlying shales 
to the sou: 

afford an inexhaustible aniouut of 
asphaltum, and I II am of 

the opinion also that at depths ranging 
from 1500 to 1600 feet, oil of much higher 
gravity will he discoTcred. 

the purpose of developing this 
rty and bringing it quickly to a 
dividend paying basis, I would r 
mend that shallow wells or open 1: 
made on it in such places and manner a* 
would produce sufficient oil or liquid 
asphaltum to supply a re6nery plant of 
about 100 barrel* per day capacity. These j 
can be so arranged and k» ated tin 
pumping plant would operate them nil, 
and pump the material directly to the 
rc6nery tanks through proper pipes. 

The common products would l>c 
asphalt for street paving. pi|>e dipping, 
roofing and other common uses, but 
much of the material would work up into 
finer grades such as used for printers 
inks, varnishes, japans and in the arts, 
that is worth from 3 cents to 5 cents per 
pound. 

This piece of property when fully 
developed is capable of producing more 
than ten times this estimate and will pay- 
heavy dividends for many years. 

I also advocate the immediate sinking 
of a deep well at about the center of the 
property with a view of reaching the 
deeper deposits beneath. 

Prom all the Indications surrounding 
it, such a well should yield at least 200 



PACFIC Oil. RKI'ORTHR. 






boos, now demanded by our h 

topic are aware of 
the extent to which carbon pro- 
ducts of this nature enter into the 
industries of the present day. 

de from paving and roofing 
material, which is well known 
preparations of bitumen arc 
extensively for insulating and 
preserving electrical appliances 
and cables. 

ThJl ibly a use that will 

be greatly extended in the near 
future, as india rubber is becom- 
ing scarce and high priced, ami the 
fine i|tiality of bitumen for the 
same uses is being more estab- 
lished. 

Asphaltum paints for the preser- 
vation for all metals is unsurpassed. 
and great quantities will be used 
on the bottoms of ships and war- 
vessels. 

The antiseptic and preservative 
property of asphalt paint for wood- 
work and foundations is also well 
known. But the fine shellacs and 
varnishes which can be made from 
it are still secrets of the trade. 

The mysteriesof chemistry have 
many surprises for the unitiated. 




Messrs. Scupham and Allen waiting for their ship to come in. Aleatraz Refinery on the point in the 
distance. November 30, 1901. 



barrels per day, and perhaps many more. 

The location of this property relative 
to ocean and railroad transportations is a 
feature of great importance, as the 
markets of the world are within reach. 

The climatic conditions are perfect for 
carrying on operations every day in the 
year without interruption from the ele- 
ments. The surface of this land is 
nearly all under a high sta e of culti- 
vation, having a large number of orange 
and lemon trees that grow to a high 
degree of perfection. The lemon crop 
this year amounted to 13,000 boxes worth 
at the tree from 50 to 75 cents per box. 
The total revenue from the land culti- 
vated exceeds $8,000 per year. 

The photos accompanying this were 
taken by myself and shows the different 
objects mentioned herein. 

Very respectfully submitted, 

C. W. AYBRS, M. E. 

The Columbian Oil Asphalt and 
Refining Company are preparing 
vigorously to work this Higgins 
Tract as well as other lands held 
by them. Plans and specifications 
are prepared for a refinery to be 
erected on the Higgins Tract, and 
a careful system of distilling 
and refining has been perfected, 
which will reduce this pure pro- 
duct of nature into the various 
merchantable forms of hydrocar- 



Aniong these are the beautiful 
analine dyes, so brilliant and of 
such various colors, that are also 
the product of these same black 
hydro-carbon oils. 

The company that proposes put- 
ting up the refinery, and working 
this Higgins tract, have also lands 
on other portions of the coast. It 
is an Arizona corporation and its 
stock is non-assessable. It is 
capitalized at $1,000,000, has an 
energetic set of directors and 
officials, with offices in the Crocker 
Building in this city, and is 
financed by the American Invest- 
ment company, 2 Kilby street, 

Boston, Mass. 

With a trunk line railroad cross- 
ing the property and water trans- 
portation also available the success 
of this company should be well 
assured. 

Little Coast News. 

Owing to lack of space, and to 
the fact that most of the drilling 
crews were laid off during the 
holidays, but little development 
work was done in the various 
fields the week past, as a conse- 
quence this department is omitted 
this week. 



Whilst 

769,100 

shai. 

Oil Stock 

have been 

Bought and Sold 

during the year 11,00 

JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ 

the year 1901 

has closed with a record of 

l,<J68,tU$:* shares 

which he handled during the past 12 months. 

The year 1902 

will no doubt show still greater activity 

in oil stocks and your orders for which, 

be it buying or selling, 

a e hereby solicited and assured of 

prompt End faithful attention by 

JOSEPH B. TOPLITZ 

Member Producers Oil Exchange 

330 PINE STREET 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Worswick 

Asphalt 

Company 




Hearst Building 



Mines 



Santa Barbara County 



California I 

H 

m 

m 
W. A. Worswick, Consulting Engineer ,| 




San Francisco m 

m 



14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



LETTER FROM KERN. 



General Items of News From the 
Great Oil Field. 

{From a Regular Correspondent.) 

It is extremely quiet in the 
Kern River field. Most of the oil 
well workers have been out of 
town during the past week for 
the holidays, which has added a 
further degree or two to the in- 
tense quiet. 

The general opinion still pre- 
vails that the combine will not 
materialize, or if it does it will be 
very much abbreviated as com- 
pared with the original plans. 

There is a belief that after 
January business will pick up a 
little. 

In spite of the railroad and ex- 
pectation, the past month has not 
witnessed any appreciable spurt 
in operations at Sunset. It is not 
at all likely that Sunset will boom 
until conditions change and war- 
rant. It is estimated that Sunset 
can furnish from 3,000 to 5,000 
barrels. There is not the least 
doubt but if adequate transporta- 
tion facilities could be provided a 
very large percentage of the stor- 
age Oil in Kern county could be 
moved at once to a ready market. 
Mr. Miller, of the Standard Oil 
company, is quoted by a close 
friend as saying that there is al- 
most no end to the demand if only 



transportation could be provided. 
A pipe line to San Francisco 
would be of incalcuable value to 
the producers of Kern county. 

It is quite likely that when field 
operations are again resumed wire 
cables will be more generally used 
for drilling than ever before. At 
the present time there are ap- 
proximately twenty wire cables 
in use in the state. Some com- 
panies have concluded in the fu- 
ture to buy nothing but wire 
cables for drilling; they are 
cheaper and easier handled. 
When there is lots of fluid in the 
hole, it is almost impossible to 
make any progress with rope, 
while with wire a fast hole is 
made. The difference in price is 
considerable. Mcst of the wire 
cables now in use are in the lower 
fields. 

There are seven oil well supply 
stores in Bakersfield and another 
big store is opening. Evidently 
the new-comer believes there is 
room on top for one more whether 
there is any business or not. It is 
likely that another year will see 
fewer of these stores than there 
are now. It is rumored that one 
or two of them will not re-stock 
unless business shows a decided 
change. At Los Angeles the 
California Supply company is 
preparing to put in a stock of sup- 



plies. Up to this time this com- 
pany has only maintained head- 
quarters at Los Angeles and done 
a wholesale business. 

Oil men who travel between 
here and Los Angeles are feeling 
edge-wise toward the Southern 
Pacific for taking off the oil men's 
train which formerly left Los An- 
geles for Bakersfield at 10:20 p. m., 
arriving here at 7 o'clock the next 
morning. The Bakersfield sleeper 
was always well patronized; sel- 
dom were any berths left unoc- 
cupied. Now Bakersfield pas- 
sengers have to come up on the 
Owl and it's gold dollars to bad 
doughnuts that a berth cannot be 
had after 10 A. M. and if you don't 
get a berth, you don't get on the 
train. Still worse: the company 
refuses to put on a Bakersfield 
sleeper and as a result the pas- 
senger is dumped out at Kern at 
midnight after paying $1.50 for 
his sleeper. It's looked upon as 
highway robbery. It would not 
seem quite so flagrant a case if it 
were not for the fact that a sleeper 
is sent out on the noon train from 
Los Angeles for the 9:30 train 
from here in the evening for Los 
Angeles. Frequently this sleeper 
does not arrive here in time for 
the 9:30 train in which case those 
who have engaged berths have to 
do the best they can. The sleeper 



leaving Los Angeles at noon is 
seldom if ever patronized. If the 
oil men were given a Pullman on 
the Owl their lacerated feelings 
would be healed and the railroad 
company would have what would 
appear to a man up a derrick a 
much more business-like arrange- 
ment. 

Successful Oil Man. 

H. W. Smith is well known 
among the oil districts of Cali- 
fornia on account of the fact that 
he has been actively engaged in 
the oil business for several years, 
and has operated extensively in 
the Fullerton, Los Angeles, Kern 
River, San Benito and McKittrick 
districts. 

He has drilled and owned a 
large number of wells, and under- 
stands the business thoroughly 
both from a practical, as well as 
theoretical and scientific stand- 
point. 

Although his headquarters are 
in San Francisco his widely dis- 
persed oil interests necessitate 
frequent trips to the various fields. 
Mr. Smith is also actively engaged 
in mining in Southern California. 
He is associated in business with 
F. J. Carmen, President of the 
Grace Oil company. 

Indiana reports completion of 
nearly all drilling scheduled for 
1901. 



I JAMES R. T. MERSHON 1 

I Stock Broker | 

1 ' I 

I 537=538=539 PARROTT BUILDING | 

P SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. || 

§s S3 

SS ■ S3 

JVg References: San Francisco Banks. Sn 

Wd Authentic information furnished regarding corporations operating in the State of California CM 

rvj I have trustworthy data always available. S, 

8$ 83 

5r^ Correspondence welcomed. tftf 



^c^^^c^^^c^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s^as 



/ 



PACIFIC 



RAILROAD IN THB *!ID\\ \\ . 



Route to Be Followed and the 
Well* It Will Probably Tap 

The oil producers of Sunset and 
Midway districts are vitally inter- 
ested in the early construction of 
a railroad which will leave the 
line just constructed somewhere 
near its terminal and will run as a 
spur from the main line and 
will have as its first objective 
point the center of section 2, 
where are located the Monarch, 
the Areola, the Superior, the Gold 
Dollar, the Bakersfield Crude, the 
Occidental, the Obispo and other 
companies which either now have 
large producing wells, or could 
have them thereby drilling, if it 
were possible to market their oil. 
From 12 a railraod would probably 
run skirting the hills across 35, 
where are the fine wells of Jewett, 
Blodgett & Beale, and from there 
would run up to 32 tapping the 
property of the California Fortune 
Oil company, the Stratton and 
others of like importance. 

From 32 the railroad will pro- 
bably run skirting the hills across 
29, 19, 24. 23, 14, 15, and on up to 
section 8, in township 32, range 

23- 

A road thus constructed in its 
northern extremity would tap 
some of the richest oil property in 
northern Sunset and in the Mid- 
way districts, such as the Bay 
City Oil company and its sub- 
companies such as the Usona, the 
Cassa, the Burks, and the Buena 
Vista. 

Other companies besides the 
Bay City and its sub-companies, 
are the Kern Crude, Bond Guar- 
antee, Sunset Coast, Mascot, Kern 
Crown, Jolly Joker, Bankers & 
Brokers, Sultan, and the Mountain 
Boy. 

On sections 6, 7, 8, 17, 20 and 21 
are the Chanslor-Canfield com- 
pany's holdings, all of which are 
known to be on proven oil terri- 
tory, and wells drilled here are 
bound to be good producers. On 
section 8, the Chanslor Canfield 
company already have two good 
producing wells. 

The Oregon-Midway has a fine 
producing well on this same sec- 
tion and they continue drilling on 
this section as well as on sections 
5 and 4. 

A road up to section 8, 32-23 
would touch the northern bound- 
ary of the Sunset and Midway oil 
fields. Pipe lines can be run from 
the producing wells to convenient 
points on this spur track at com- 
paratively little cost, there being 
a good grade in every case. 

Should a main pipe line be run 
from upper Midway down to the 
present terminus of the Sunset 
road, it would follow nearly the 
same line as has been indicated 
above for the proposed railway. 

This pipe line would necessitate 
also the building of smaller pipe 
lines jnst as is necessitated by 
the building of the railroad; for 



each company would be obliged 
to construct its own private pipe 
line to the main pipe line, and 
thus the expense entailed would 
be the same with the pipe line as 
with the railroad, the advantage 
of the railroad being that the pro- 
ducers now occupying this district 
would not be obliged to go down 
into their own pockets 10 pay for 
the main pipe line. 

Under these conditions it would 
seem more advantageous for the 
producers in northern Sunset and 
Midway, if possible, to induce the 
railroad to extend its spur track 
from its present terminus at the 
Jewett & Blodgett refinery up to, 
at least, 8, 32 23 which would in 
volve a track about fourteen or 
fifteen miles in length. 

Section 8, 32-23 is only about 
twelve miles from Asphalto in the 
McKittrick district, and it might 
be asked why the railroad should 
not build a spur ftom McKittrick 
district into Midway, rather thai 
con'inue the spur which runs from 
Gosford to the Jewett & Blodgett 
refinery in Sumet. 

The reason is because, although 
the grade from Asphalto to north- 
ern Sunset is easy, there is abso- 
lutely nothing in the way of oil 
or any other commodity produced 
between Asphalto and section 8. 

Wells have been driven to the 
depth of 2,000 feet by the Chans- 
lor-Canfield company in this dis- 
trict and have failed to strike oil 
sand, consequently a road running 
through this portion of the field 
would have absolutely no feeders. 



A "Chicken Socket." 

A fishing appliance which is 
said to work admirably on dark 
nights, the darker the bettei, has 
been put into practical use by an 
oil well worker out in Ohio, ac- 
cording to the Findlay Republi- 
can. It is called a chicken socket. 

The instrument consists of a 
joint of inch pipe through which 
a noose of wire is passed, which 
may be increased or decreased in 
size at will. When the shadows 
of evening fall the festive tool 
dresser hies himself to the nearest 
orchard where he thinks a belated 
fowl or two may be roosting. 
When the chicken is sighted the 
loop is extended and thrown over 
the bird's head. Then the toolie 
pulls the wire and the noose en- 
circles the chicken's neck and 
kills the bird. One tool dresser 
who is an adept at using the 
chicken socket secured seven 
choice fowls in one night. 



To Drill in Peru. 

Samuel Dunham of Sistersville 
left Wednesday for New York, 
where he will be joined by several 
other oil drillers. They are going 
to Peru, South America, to drill 
for oil, having been sent on the 
trip by the Oil Well Supply Com- 
pany of Pittsburg. They will 
leave New York Saturday and go 
to Brazil, and then up the Ama- 
zon River, and across the moun- 
tains to their destination. — St. 
Mary's (W. Va.) Oracle. 



OIL RBPORTB* 

OIL DIRECTORY 

cn.linii ■: .mi •. iic- Now Ojxrat- 
in£ In Cnllfurnla. 

'^•r*d to lake 

.' rtfher property: thoroughly 

SINKING UHLU tl 

I.V 

A.l.ltr*. Caltiti c» oil artel l>c* rt.>i>ment Com- 
pany. >4 Merchant." P.xrhange. S.o Krai). 

NKTPBTF.OI 

Capital Iijo.ooo 

So,ooo aharea al f i 
Loratli n— Frrano county. 

Pair, prtatdtat, MteWPU- 

ton, *i. • )ia». A. I.ee. trcaaur. i 

s6i Parrott Building. 

I\\I1MV Oil. COMPANV 
anted 

McKiltrk-k district. 16 completed well., no 
oflK-e. 3J0 Pine St.. Konm v San Pranrl.ro, Cnl. 

OBISPO OIL COMPANY. Capital, fl.ooo.ooo. 
Number of -hares. 1,000.000 1 

o .ho shirirv All Mock lull* I mil and 
non-aMeft»able. Incorporated under tire lawn ol 
California. Properties In Keru. Hrrsnn. Snu 

iter iio and sun i.ui-. OMapo counties, Cal. In* 

corporators: Q K PafklDMO 1'icsiilrnl Bank <>l 

Palo Alto; Cnptnin Frnnlc imt.elt Pi 

K \v 111. .wo : Bond, Mmm 

npoiis, Minn. ; c p Alderaon Chicago, r.i. offi- 
cers: John P Gilea, president; flunk Barrett. 

vice president: C H A Win sun. secretary and trea- 
surer. K \V Brotm, assistant secretary Office, 
suite 71. Citizens ntink budding. 110-121 La Salle 
street. Chicago. 111. 

/"Vtl. LANDS, 

Near Sunset District, 

Kein Cour.ly. Cal.fornia 
6000 acres. 

For sale or exchange Cheap 

Me.lFKE BROTHF.RS, 
108 Montgomery st., San Francisco. 

POTOMAC Oil. COMPANY. Cap'tal slock, 
" 12 8io.ooo; Par value, fl. 00. Has 2.000 acres 
in Kern, I.os Angeles and Summerland fields, 
with 27 producing wells. Officers Hud directors: 
P V Schernieihorn. president: C H Ritchie, vice- 
president; R D Robinson secretary and treas- 
urer; I) M Schennerhorn and W S Moltou. I'rin 
clpal office. Potomac building, Los Angeles, Cal. 
Tel. Johu 2281. 

CTANDAKD ROCK OIL COMPANY. 

Capital Jioo.ooo 

Treasury stock $1 so 000 

Location; 92 acres leased proven oil land in 
McKittrick; 80 acre, owned in Coalinga near 
Home Oil company Fresno; 160 acres owned ad- 
joining oil well in Napa valley 

Leased 6.ro acres asplialtum land in Santa 
C'ara county. Asphalmin 1 erjnery creeled. 

Officers: R A Falkenbere, president; R L Bis- 
by, vice-president; M J Henry, secretary; J G 
Steele, treasurer; F Cooke-Caldwell, attorney for 
company. 

Offices: 475-76 Parrott Building, 8ys Market 
street. San Francisco, Cal. 

■ 1 S. OIL AND MINING CO. 

Capital 1300,000 

Par value |i per share. 

Location: 320 acres in Kern River Distric 160 
acres in section 27, n-24 Sunset district, near Blod- 
gett & Jewett wells, noacresonfractiont 26, 12-24. 
near Monarch, adjoining Jewett, Blodget & Beal 
gusher. L. M. Underwood, president, F Ketelhut 
secretary. 

Office — 211 iQth street, Bnlrersfield.lCal. 

WALTOKF OIL AND ASPHALT COMPANY. 
Incorporated Feb 25. iqoi. Capital, $500,000 
500,00c shares at $1.00 per share. Place of busi- 
ness, I.aoford, Cal. Headouajters at McCord & 
Son. Location of lauds. 1.2, o, Guadalupe, Santa 
Barbara county, Cal. Officers and directors: Geo 
B McCord, president, Hanfotd; Dr N P Duncan, 
vice-president, Han ford; J O Hickman, treas- 
urer, Hanford; Wm M Madden, attorney for com- 
pany. San Francisco; W H Worswick. field super- 
intendent. Hanford: F Brader. Hanford. N V. eis- 
baum, Hanford, LS Chittenden, Hanford, W H 
Worswick, Jr, Hanford. Jas Manasse, secretary. 

IT WILL PAY YOU 

to write to P. O. Box 117, Visalia, 
Cal,, before you buy OIL STOCK, 
lease or buy OIL LANDS or Oil 
Casing. 






M. GROSSMAYER. 

CONTRACTOR FOR 

Drilling Oil Wells 

Box 213, 
Bakersfield, Cal. 

Room 17, 
1921 Chester Ave. 




INCORPORATE OR 
INVEST IN ARIZONA 



A 

IF 

•on wish to incorporate u 
terprisc, send for l.ooklct ol in - 
forinnttoii 011 corporation! mid 
cop) of Arizona laws, the chenp- 
oiil mod liberal laws in tlic 
United State* 

We nl-u attend to investments 
or procure mfonDttton on .m\ 
enterprise in Arizona. Capital 
Cor Investment lolicited, Adareai 

THE WESTERN 
INVESTMENT COMPANY 



Run M S 

PORTER 


1 AND a 
11 LOCK 


PHOENIX 


ARIZONA 



For Lease 



Twenty acres of absolutely proven oil 
land in McKittrick district to lease on 
royalty liasis for development work. 
Chance for good, responsible driller. 
Securities required. 

For further particulars, address, 

W. G. KERCKBOFF 



Wilcox Block, Los Angeles. 



LI. Grossmayer's Drilling Outfit. 



SUNSET 
LIMITED 



One of the most magnificent trains 
ever built. For 1901-1902 tri-weekly 
via Coast Line and Sunset Route for 

NEW ORLEANS and 
NEW YORK 

Leave SAN FRANCISCO 4:50 p. m. 
Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays. 

Leave LOS ANGELES 8:30 p. m. 
Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays. 

Arrive NEW ORLEANS 7:20 p. in. 
Thursdays, Saturdays, Mondays. 

Among the world's noted Highways of 
Travel not one equals the route of this 
train. Get the little book, "Wayside 
Notes," from any agent of the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Initial trip of Sunset Limited 
Friday, Dec. 6, from San Francisco. 



Oil Stocks 

Sold in New York and all Eastern 
Markets. Oil, copper and gold com- 
panies financed. 

Hillyer, Clarke & Co.. 

Bankers and Brokers, 
52 Broadway, New York. 



Pacific 

Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Subscription, $2. SO Pep Year 



i6 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



A NEW DISTRICT. 



Santa Barbara County Bids Fain 
to Rival Ventura. 

A new district has lately been 
added to the oil fields of California. 

A year ago the oil field of Santa 
Barbara was limited to the Sum 
merland district. 

Within the last few months the 
locality known as the Carreaga 
rancho, not far from Santa Maria, 
and about nine miles from the 
ocean, has sprung into prominence, 
on account of the success that has 
attended the persistent efforts of 
the Western Union Uil company 
to reach prolific oil sands. 

The Western Union is a Los 
Angeles company, and Thomas 
Hughes is the able manager. The 
company controls 7,500 acres. 

Encouraged by the success that 
has attended the Western Union, 
Henry J. Crocker, J. A. Fairchild, 
and their associates have com- 
menced active development work 
on the property of the Graciosa 
Oil company with which they are 
connected. 

They hold 7,500 acres of the 
Harris part of the Los Alamos 
rancho, adjoining the Carreaga 
rancho, and their first well is be- 
ing drilled almost within a stone's 
throw of well No. 2 of the Western 
Union which is now yielding a 
good 200 barrels a day. 

The occompanying cut shows 
the rigs of the Graciosa Oil com- 
pany and rigs Nos. 1 and 2 of the 
Western Union. All the treasury 
stock of the Graciosa Oil com- 
pany has been sold, one of the 
largest stockholders being Louis A. 
Phillips, trustee, of the Alaska 
Exploration company. 

The oil obtained here is of a 
high gravity and is suitable for 
refining purposes, being similar to 
the Ventura oil which is used by 
the Pacific Coast Oil company. 

Beside the Western Union and 
the Graciosa the other companies 



drilling in this district are the 
Casmalia, and the Hartwell Oil 
companies, while the Huasna is at 
work fourteen miles north of Santa 
Maria. 

It is confidently expected that 
in six months there will be at 
least twenty wells in this district 
producing a high grade oil. 

Blue Clay or Shale. 

The blue clay or shale which is 
found adjoining bituminous de- 
posits and is encountered in wells 
drilled for petroleum just before 
the oil is reached, owes it blue 
color to the fact that the iron in 
the shale or clay was converted 
from an oxide to a ferreous carbon- 
ate by the action of organic matter, 
to-wit bituminous vapors or 
bitumen. Carbonate of iron is a 
dark grayish blue or green. Upon 
burning this clay or shale they 
turn red by the oxydation of the 
carbonate; of iron. Consequently 
blue shales or clays are to a cer- 
tain extent indicative of the 
presence of bitumen. 

A. S. Cooper, E. M. 

The Pacific Underwriting and 
Trust Company. 

Incorporate Companies under 
the laws of all states and terri- 
tories. 

Furnish Bonds: Interest and 
non-interest bearing, toback stocks 
and bonds of Corporations. 

Furnish lists of investors. 

Promote all legitimate proposi- 
tions. 

Invest money and guarantee 
Four (4") per cent per annum net, 
interest payable semi-annually. 

Mining, Mercantile, Patents, 
Railroads, Timber and Manufactur- 
ing propositions, prcmoted. 

Call or write for information. 
Main Offices, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, California. 



A Notable Educator. 

There are hundreds, yes thous- 
ands, of young men and women 
on the Pacific Coast who are to- 
day occupying honored and lucra- 
tive positions in the business and 
professional world who owe what 
they possess largely to the educa- 
tion, learning and experience they 
have acquired at Heald's Business 
College, of which Professor E. P. 
Heald is the capable and honored 
head. 

The Professor believes in giving 
a young man or woman the 
weapons that will prove of service 
in fighting the battle of life, and 
he does not load his pupils down 
with a lot of unnecessary parapher- 
nalia that hinders more than it 
helps. Or to put it in another 
way, he gives his pupils plenty of 
meat and potatoes, and lets others 
furnish the cake and ice-cream. 

But this is not oil talk. Suffice 
it to say there are a great many 
young people all over the coast, 
and in the east, too, who will be 
glad to know Prrfessor Heald is 
interested in several important oil 
enterprises, and that too with every 
chance of ultimate and great suc- 
cess. Professor Heald is princi- 
pally interested in the great Fresno- 
San Ben'to district, which is a con- 
tinuation of the Coalinga field, 
which has made so many people 
very wealthy. 

He has also been a director in 
the California Petroleum Miners' 
Association since its inauguration 
two years ago, and it is . to his 
judgment and foresight that the 
j success of this organization is 
largely due. 

Professor Heald is now greatly 
interested in the Palace Oil com- 
pany in the Fresno-San Benito 
district, and from its location and 
the geological evidences that 
abound, it is believed that oil will 
be found here in paying quanti- 
ties and of a quality that will put 
it in demand for refining. 



A California Fortune. 

Oil running over the casing of 
the wells, tanks all full and run- 
ning over, earthen reservoirs all 
full, oil pouring down the roads, 
oil running down the canyon, and 
once in a while spouting a great 
stream from the wells fifty feet over 
the top of a 74-foot derrick — that 
is what you could have seen a few 
days ago had you visited the 
property of the California Foitune 
Oil company in the Sunset field. 

Now they have the wells capped 
and under control, and it is possi- 
ble to reach them without getting 
covered with the disagreeable jet 
greatly-to-be-desired fluid. 

There is no better oil district in 
the state than Sunset and its 
neighbor Midway. The oil is 
there — lots of it. The oil sands 
are easil> reached for they lie only 
at about 500 feet below the surface 
where the California Fortune 
property is located,' the drillng 
is easy, and the consequent ex- 
pense of a well comparatively 
small. 

As soon as the pipe line is con- 
structed to the terminus of the rail- 
road, the oil can be marketed and 
dividends will soon be paid. 
This can be but a matter of a very 
short time only. 

Besides its 80 acres in Sunset 
the company also has 340 acres in 
the Coalinga distiict; 80 acres in 
the Arroyo Honda district, Fresno 
count> ; and a large tract in 
the Wyoming oil field that has 
recently ccme into such promi- 
nence on account of the fine 
quality of Illuminating oil found 
here. 

The California Fortune is well 
managed and well officered, and 
there is every reason to believe 
that when transportation arrange- 
ments are perfected, as they will 
be in the near future, this com- 
pany will be one of the greatest 
producers and shippers in the 
state. 



Conservatism vs. Wild=Catism 

Each separate oil proposition placed upon the market since oil has become a paramount financial study 
has been a "sure paying and well grounded proposition." Figures are forthcoming in abundance, 
but in this particular figures sometimes lie ... 

The Bankers and Brokers Oil Co. 



is not a mushroom proposition, but seeks to interest well intentioned investors in the following 
statement, which voices its entire intentions: 



Sec. 23, T. 32 S.. R. 23 B.. M. D. M. 



\« 


4 • 

• 
• 


3 


2 


1 


6 


5 


8 


\ 9 * 


• 10 # 

• 


11 


12 


7 


8 


17 


• 

16 

• 


• 
\ * 


• 
14 

• • 


13 


18 


17 


20 


21 


• 22 #N 

• • 


n; 23 


24 


19 


20 


29 


28 


• 

27 


• X 

26 > 

• 


* X 


30 


29 


32 


33 


- 34 


35 


'36 \ 

• 


• 

31 * 


• 32 

• 


5 


4 


3 


2 


1 


••V 

•X 
3*\ 


•i 5 



All wells sunk in the center of the Oil Belt have proven to be large flowing wells. Our prop- 
erty is in the center of the oil belt, with producers on all sides. Our well is down over 980 feet - 
We are drilling night and day, and will have a gusher in a few days. Well No. 2 will be started 
when No. 1 is finished. Property owned by this Company is marked in black square. Well in 
white. Our Company owns 1000 acres in San Benito, and holds lease on 80 acres in Kern River, 
and on 40 acres in Sunset-Midway Districts. Treasury Stcck 15 cents per share solely fo- 
development purposes until the Gusher is brought in, then stock will advance. 



KEY TO MAP. 



Sections 
4, 5, 8, 9, 10, Midway 


Oil Co. 


Flowing 


9 Inter Nos 


(( 


Producing 


10 Oriental 


" 


" 


10-14 Way 


( I 


Drilling 


14 Selvina 


" 


" 


11 Buena Vista 


" 


" 


15-22 Bay City 


" 


Flowing 


15 Cassa 




" 


16 Badger 


II 


Producing 


22 Mountain Boy 


" 


Flowirjg 


22 Burks 


" 


Drilling 


22-23 Producers 


" 


Flowing 


23 BANKERS and BROKERS 


Drilling 


23 Jolly Joker Oil 


Co. 


In Oil 


23 B. & M. " 




" 


23 Boust 




Drilling 


25 Bakersfield " 




" 


26 Gypsy Queen" 




In Oil 


26 Mt. Diablo ■' 




" 


27 San Francisco " 




" 


31 Basin City ' 




11 


31 Majestic 




Drilling 



Sections 

32 Geyser Oil Co. 

32 Stratton Oil Co. 

34 California Fortune Oil Co. 

35 Jewett & Blodgett 



Drilling 
Flowing 



Sunset-Midway District Oil takes the lead 
and commands the highest market price for 
refining and fuel purposes. 

Refineries are only a few miles distant, and 
Sunset Railroad will be extended within a few 
hundred feet of our wells, giving us a market 
right at our property for our oil, which will net 
the Company a handsome profit. 



Bankers and Brokers Oil Company 

J W. HEISNBR & CO. 

Financial Agents 

612 PARROTT BI.DG., SAN FRANCISCO, CAI,. 

CORLISS & SON, New England Agents, 
BOSTON: MASS. 



P 4fM PTf* 



SHOULD BE ENCOURAGED 



The California Petroleum Miner*' 
Association Doing Good Work. 

The California Petroleum Mine; 
lociation was inc orpo r a ted orei a year 
and a half ago. It n the on 

rlicially representing the oil men 
'. interests of the state I 
■ociation is <|uaM public, an.! 
arc as reliable as tbev can be made 
The association is not interested in any 

t or company, but in n.l 
the w I 

among the bmw! prominent cUin 
San I ieut all dis- 

in the south, to 
Lake and Coins rth. 

liable 
and the sccrcUr 
. appear in the group on an- 
other J*age. 

In a bulletin ju»t issued the secretary 
of the association 

" w> i - bulletins nt 

<\» telling of the pr 

! while these 
bulletins will not linvc the stamp 
ernnicnt, they will be collated frith the 

.ind can be relit il o| 
intending inveslors or by those Inter- 
In tli c progress of the petroleum 
industry. Above all things we propose 
to have our figures conservative, not be- 
ing carried away by enthusiasm, and 



ile in its 



the 

to da 



bersb: . lid Ik* 

gencr. for the work 

ahead of it is enlarging nil tilt- time. An 

•-ml of 
the principal citirs of the Uni 
partlcularl) in Washington, as well as in 
I.onil- "I Berlin 

Tin the association are: 

rablc M. II. dt- Yonng, president. 
General J. M . 

lent. Arthur K. 

Lane, third rice-president; l>r C. T. 

Tin- din-. \ Wend- 

ling: Bdward A Denicke, Henry J. 
Crocker, W. A. Jacobs, W. It. Shut 
B ll. Stearns, attorney. 



Idrr in 

■ : 



• 11 k in 

t I.os Angeles 

Mr Pike is » n 
but bus resided in Shu PraociaCO thirty- 

romlnenl ni 
of tin- Mystic Shrine mid is ■ Thli 
Degn i is in the 

group of prominent oil men ili.d a| 
on the supplement page of tins leant . 



Believes in Oil. 
N'i more enthusiastic oil man cao be 

found in the si ate than TV P. Pike, a 
prominent Snn Francisco business man 



A Succc««ful Lender. 
Captain .1- W. Heianerof 6ia Panotl 
Building, Sun Prancis* of the 

mo si enterprising of i be oil nun now 

operrttintf in He is a man of 

means himself, ntnl doe* no) -i^k | ■ 
to invest thru monej except in those 
enterprises In which be himself is also ■ 
heavy investor. Captain Heisner re- 
ceived his title "n the Great Lakes, 
where he sailed and owned vessels for 
many years, commencing at the early- 



age OI IO. MC 
of »1 

aat in it He came v- - and 

il fu- 
ture : 

tin Bankers and Broki 

which has nearlj completed its first well 

iti the S 

Mr, Heianei hai I with him 

tl the most influential men in this 
ad in Chicago and the- \ 
Be 1 with the Moun- 

tnin View Gold Mining compai 
Bnmpter, Oregon, and the Grass Valley 
l Mining company at 
■ 
All tin ni ale of 

lopment, and no 

Mr. Heisner is a man of • 

i full of enterprise, and h^s always in the 

luccessful in his operations. 

i There is do doubt but that big wells will 

! he struck on tin* property "f the Bankers 

I thai tins stuck win be 

paying dividends. 

Mr. Hi mi the 

group in the supplement. 



KERR'S REPORTS 

(Inc.) 

MONTHLY OIL INVESTMENT 

TABLES 

Give prices, capitalization, assets, character ot 
charter, integrity of management and metheds, 
well progress, production and location of oil 
corporations, etc.; official maps. 

We have oil field investigators, ab= 
stract searchers and credit examin- 
ers, the only systematized oil rating agency in 
the world. Authentic Special Reports on 
any oil company, $2.00 upward. 

We have a list of 3000 oil companies; 500 
fraudulent; 800 honest but hopelessly involved 
or incompetent. Do you own stock in 
any of them? 

Subscribe for KERR'S REPORTS 

MONTHLY and keep posted . . . 

One Dollar per year 

Address KERR'S REPORTS, Mills Building, 

San Francisco, California 



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• MANUFACTURERS OF ■ 



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Steam Pumps 
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Typewriters * 

Are Used Everywhere 

READ THIS LIST: 

Heald's Business College use 30 
Southern Pacinc Co. system ..47 

Western Union Tel. Co 36 

S. F. Public Schools now use. . . 43 
S. F. Call " ...21 



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JOSEPH EASTWOOD, Proprietor. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

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109=111 Mission Street, 

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Telephone, Main 5578. 



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g Before buying Oil Stock or n 

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Manufacturers of 



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General Sheet 
Iron Works 



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Received highest award at Pan-American Exposition, Buffalo, N. Y., igoi 



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New York Office, 121 Liberty Street 



San Francisco. 
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SAN FRANCISCO 



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work a block of treasury stock is being sold at 
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The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of operating for oil or gas. 



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out California and the Pacific Coast* 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



J. No. 10. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL.. FRIDAY, JANUARY 10. iqoa. 



WELL ENGINEERING. 



Prospecting and General Management of 
Petroleum Wells. 



Keen Competition and Business Requirements Make 

it Essential That Practical Methods Be 

Employed. 



The necessity for practical 
knowledge in connection with 
prospectiDgfor petroleum oils, and 
in the management of the wells, is 
growing more in importance every 
day. There was a time when oil 
well engineers could set up a der- 
rick and begin boring in pay- 
ing sections with profitable re- 
sults; but in recent years keen 
competition and the requirements 
of the business make it essential 
that practical methods be em- 
ployed at the start. There is not 
so much opportunity for experi- 
menting as formerly. Therefore 
this article will be devoted to gen- 
eral suggestions as to this line of 
operations in the oil well engineer- 
ing profession. It is unnecessary 
to go into details relative to the 
plausible talk of speculators, who 
often deceive prospectors and 
even competent petroleum well 
engineers into buying lands and 
operating in poor districts, for 
those who have followed the work 
understand the great need of 
avoiding boom sections. Of course 
the whole thing is a lottery, but 
the trained engineer will not 
move his equipment to a new sec- 
tion every time oil is reported 
tkere. The prize spouting well 
must be long sought for, often, be- 
fore it is found. First, in this 
prospecting for petroleum oils, 
too much reliance ought not to be 
placed upon surface indications. 
Surface exudations, of course, in- 
dicate the presence of oil some- 
where in the earth, but not al- 
ways the position of the spring or 
other source from which it is de- 
rived. Often the old spring or 
other source of supply of oil is 
considerable distance from the 
spot where the oil surface indi- 
cations are located. The properties 
of certain oils enable the oil to 
ooze through strata of all kinds. 
Sometimes the oil forces a passage 
directly upward, from a to c, as 
represented in figure i. In this 
case the prospectors are enabled 
to bore straight down to the point 
of supply, but the trouble is that 
the source of supply is often very 
deep. A series of bores may be 
sunk, at points d, e and f, without 
locating the chambers containing 
the oils. The small vein of a 
petroliferous nature is often im- 



pregnated with naphtha. In the 
working of oils under these cir- 
cum tances, with a view of bring- 
ing them to the surface, the en- 
gineer should first make sure of 
the presence of the oil in sufficient 
quantities to work, and secondly, 
to ascertain as near as possible 
by repeated borings the approxi- 
mate depth. The geological ar- 



at h to the oil bearing point i. 
Often considerable depth is bored 
before the oildepository la reached. 
When the vein is at a depth like 
this, boring is the only way to get 
at it. In cases, however, the 
petroliferous vein is found to be 
near the surface, in which case it 
may be gotten at in the manner 
shown in figure 3. The workmen 
may be set to work clearing the 
surface covering and lay bare the 
bed fr^ni which the petroleum oil 
directly flows. This occurs quite 
frequently in the career of men 
who work among oil wells. The 
surface well or cage j is built of 
strong lumber, and the work of ex- 
cavation continues until the bed k 
is exposed. 

EXPERIMENTAL DRILLING. 

One of the commonest errors 
among oil well engineerings con- 
sists in series of borings in a way 




Ti& 3 









^ 


1 


>- h 3 




(\ 


M A 4>^ 




Tie 6 



TiG-7 



TIG- •*- 

II/LUSTRATTNa PBOCESBE 3 OF DET7UR- 
MINTNO LOCATION OP PETROLEUM. 

ran„emcnt of the s!ia'a and lUe 
character of the strata can be de- 
termined as the work progresses. 

If an engineer goes to a field in 
which oil is already being taken out 
he finds ground ready developed 
and can put in his plant and com- 
mence operations. In a new field 
he must rely upon surface indica- 
tions and other signs common to 
the presence of oils in the earth. 
The penetrating power of the oils, 
in working surfaceward, is shown 
in figure 1, in which the strata of 
sand g is impregnated, also the 
softer earth as at b. Cane drills 
are quite extensively used in locat- 
ing these veins. 

In figure 2 is a cane drill sunk 




TTe~& 

SOME. OF THE OILMEN'S EQUIPMENTS) 

ill which tliue is au d^iioili: plan. 
Sometimes the engineers bore 
promiscuosly, with the result that 
there will be a number of wells 
sunk in rotation or in a disorderly 
fashion, and no oilis reached. Often 
the method results in just missing 
the paying oil deposit. Therefore 
in recent time engineers have 
adopted a plan of boring. In figure 
4t his is illustrated. Trial wells 
are first drilled. These form the 
center about which the other bor- 
ing will be. The plan of following 
a straight line, outward from the 
center bores like the line 1, is to 
be avoided. A well may be sunk 
at 1, another at 2, another at 3, 
and another at 4. But it has been 



Prick, Ten Cents 

found that only the chances for 
missing the oil bearing sands are 

'greater according to this system 
than when a tri-angular formation 

lis adopted, like the plan in figure 
I marked m. Here the first hole 

lis sunk at 1, the second at 2 and 
the third at 3. The territory cov- 

lered is broader than when the 
Mii^le line is forward. A further 
distribution of the drillings is ob- 
tained by engineers who adopt the 
system at n, in which a zigzag line 
is made, beginning at I, thence to 
2, and so on to the last boring 
marked 5. As the wells are sunk 
the engineers take accountings of 
the trials, and are prepared to sink 
deeper bores whenever indications 
of paying quantities are found. 

We next show some of the 
devices which are in use by the 
oil well men. 

SAMPLE COLLECTING. 
Oil well engineers find that it 
pays to have with them a box 
made like that in figure 5, with 
various compartments in which to 
place samples of products. The 
pigeon holes can be used to hold 
specimens, and as each is marked, 
and the corresponding number 
placed in a book, with full account- 
ing of the product, it is very easy 
for the engineers to keep track of 
the samples as the work of boring 
progresses. The best way to get 
the samples is from the end of the 
drill. Every time that the drill is 
raised enough earthy matter is 
deposited thereon to form a sample. 
If the earth is clayey, it is an easy 
matter to form it into a ball, and 
then deposit these balls into the 
holes in the box, one ball of each 
trial, properly labeled. Some en- 
gineers cut the substance into disks 
and these are used as samples. 
Crushed rock is also selected if 
necessary, and any portion of the 
matter desirable to retain as speci- 
mens. 

SAMPLE PROCDRING ATTACHMENT. 

Some men have used various 
forms of devices for getting samples 
out of the bottoms of the wells. 
In figure 6 is a very effective little 
contrivance which can be used 
with good results. It is a bell- 
shaped affair, made with an open- 
ing at the base, in which portion 
there is a set or a pair of lids, a, 
and these lids are so made that 
they open inward, so that the 
earthy substances can be worked 
upward into the dome, and re- 
tained there by the closing of the 
lids. Thus samples of oil-contain- 
ing substances can be secured, by 
having this device fastened to the 
end of a shaft or rope and lowered 
to the base of the boring. 

TEMPORARY TRIPOD. 

Instead of erecting costly der- 
ricks, often the engineers find it 
more convenient to build light tri- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



pods such as is shown in figure 7. 
This is made with three pieces of 
2x4 lumber, the upper ends of 
which are wound with a rope b. 
The lower ends are sometimes 
sharpened and can be sunk into 
the ground to assure steadiness, 
while if desired, the feet can be 
left blunt, and the poles held in 
position by piling up stone work 
about them as shown. Thus the 
tripod can be shifted about easily 
from one point of boring- to an- 
other. 

LIGHT TANK CART. 

Figure 8 shows a good form of 
light oil tank cart, suitable for ser- 
vice in lines of experiment. The 
ordinary weighty tank cart, on 
four wheels, requires that roads 
be built for it, also lour or even 
six horses to haul it. These little 
two--wheeled carts can be hauled 
over the roughest sorts of roads 
by one animal to points where 
the prospecting is going on. 

SHOOTING AN EXPLODING CART- 
RIDGE; INTO A CAVITY. 

In experimenting and prospect- 
ing at new wells in new fields, the 
engineers are subjected to all 
descriptions of tests with devices, 
and in figure 9 is one which has 
been used with practical results. \ 
It has been found that in some 
borings horizontal cavities extend 
to chambers in which oils are con- 
fined with gases, naphtha and 
other substances, and that only 
thin walls of rock or earth sepa- 
rate the same. In order to release 
the oils which are thus confined, 
and permit them to flow into a 
main boring, as in figure 9, an ex- 
ploding shell can be shot into the 
horizontal cavity and caused to 
burst. First, the shell, g, is placed 
inside of a tube, in the bottom of 
which is a spiral spring, as at c. 
C. marks the tube in section and 
the spring is at the base below the 
shell of the exploding cartridge. 
The tube is lowered into the hole, 
to a point oppisite the cavity to 
be entered by means of the rope. 
The wire, e, is fixed to a releasing 
spring at,d, which causes thespiral 
spring to throw out the cartridge 
at the right time. The course of 
the cartridge will be on the line h, 
and it finally lands at i, where the 
lighted fuse causes it to explode 
and break the walls which have 
formed the chamber for holding in 
the gases and oils. After the ex- 
plosion the oils are freed and flow 
to the main hole, where they can 
be pumped out. — Oil, Paint and 
Drug Reporter. 

In Receiver's Hands. 

The National Asphalt and the 
Asphalt Company of • America, 
which are known as the asphalt 
trust, has passed into the hands of 
receivers. Some time ago it be- 
came evident to the financiers be- 
hind the big combine that it might 
be unable to. meet its accruing 
fixed charges. A few days ago a 
default in the payment of $500,000 
interest due on the bonds of the 



company was found to be inevit- 
able. Representatives of a majority 
of the bondholders applied for the 
appointment of receivers. This 
application was not opposed by 
the representatives of the trust, 
and was granted. The National 
Asphalt company has a total 
authorized capital stcck of $22,- 
000,000 of which $'2,000,000 is 
common and $10,000,000 preferred 
stock. Of this amount $1 1,575,000 
common and $8,025,000 preferred 
was issued at the time of the 
formation of the corporation, the 
remaining $425,000 common and 
$1,975,000 preferred being reserved 
for the acquisition of properties 
and similar purposes. 



Los Angeles Stocks 

The first week in the New Year 
opened up briskly on the Los 
Angeles Stock Board. Trading 
was more general than usual, the 
aggregate amount was larger and 
in the case of several securities 
the prices were better. 

Reed Crude was the feature of 
the week, many thousands of 
shares changing hands. This 
stock opened on Monday at 34 
cents and closed on Saturday at 
35^ cents, the demand continu- 
ing strong at the advanced figure. 
The prospects are fair for a con- 
tinued rise in this stock. Several 
other of the better known oil 
stocks made slight advances, 
notably Globe, Westlake and Brea 
Canyon. 

Mining stocks continue to hold 
the center of thestage, particularly 
Black Hills Copper, Verde King, 
Wedge and Butte Lode. Black 
Hills Copper has been climbing 
upwards for the past month and is 
now difficult to obtain at the old 
figures. 

Bank stocks and miscellaneous 
securities have been also coming 
in for their share of the New Year 
activity. Farmers & Merchants 
has fallen off considerably since 
cashier Fleishman took his vaca- 
tion, but most of the other stocks 
have either held their own or 
made slight advances. 

Edison Electric is still the leader 
among the miscellaneous securities 
having registered an advance of 
several points within the past two 
weeks. 

On the whole trading has been 
quite satisfactory and now that 
the exchange is established in new 
quarters in the very heart of the 
city the outlook is bright for a 
continued career of prosperity. 



As Usual. 

Wildcat operations, as a rule, 
prove unsatisfactory. This applies 
to Utah as well as California, ac- 
cording to the following extract 
from the Emery County Progress, 
published in the supposed oil dis- 
trict of Utah. 

" The machinery and derrick of 
the San Rafael Oil company have 
been moved about one mile east 
and the eastern expert oil drillers 
are already engaged on their con- 
tract for sinking a new well. 
Many people ask if the old well, 
about 1400 deep, has been aban- 
doned, and the answer is "No." 
The reason for changing the base 
of operations will appear later." 



KERR'S REPORTS 

(Inc.) 

MONTHLY OIL INVESTMENT 

TABLES 

Give prices, capitalization, assets, character ot 
charter, integrity of management and methods, 
well progress, production and location of oil 
corporations, etc.; official maps. 

We have oil field investigators, ab= 
stract searchers and credit examin- 
ers, the only systematized oil rating agency in 
the world. Authentic Special Reports on 
any oil company, $2.00 upward. 

We have a list of 3000 oil companies; 500 
fraudulent; Poo honest but hopelessly involved 
or incompetent. Do you own stock in 
any of them? 

Subscribe for KERR'S REPORTS 

MONTHLY and keep posted . . . 

One Dollar per year 

Address KERR'S REPORTS, Mills Building, 

San Francisco, California 



THE BEST CASING PULLER 



The Norton Ratchet Jack 

With Ring and Slips for Pulling 
Casing. 



ALWAYS SAFE, READY AND EFFECTIVE 



This jack is self lubricating, pro- 
vided with ball bearings, giving 
maximum of efficiency with mini- 
mum of friction. No blocking re- 
quired, as the hold of the ling and 
slips is absolute. 

Jacks, rings and slips for all 
sizes of either screw casing or 
drive pipe for rent in the principal 
oil fields of California. For prices 
and particulars address 

M. G. WEST, 216 California Street, San Francisco. 




Bovaird & Seyfang Mf'g Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OF - 









Stationary and Portable Boilers, Steam Engines, 

Iron Tanks, Rig Iron Outfits, Drilling and Fishng Tools, 

And everything needed to drill and operate 



OH, Gas and Artesian Wells 

Manufacturers' Agents for Tubing. Casing, Pipe Fittings, Valves, Etc. 

Natural Gas Plants a Specialty. 

Cable address, "Boang." ABC and Private Codes. 

BRADFORD, PA., U. S A. 






OILING THB ROADS. 



Coal and Kitu 



men. 



KlngH Count) Improt ir»> It- Hlijh- 

;>ervisor Tomer has just re- 
ceived a carload of oil and will to- 
day begin oiling the roads in his 
district. The work will bej 
the Hanford cemetery and con- 
tinue south. 

Supervisor Timer estimates 
that a car of oil wi 1 sprinkle one 
mile of road. The car contains 
65.000 gallons, which at 20 cents a 
barrel at the McKittrick wells, 
■mounts to $38.69. 

The work of oiling the ronds is 
not an experiment. While to- 
day's work is the first of the kind 
done in this county, other coun- 
ties have tritd oiling the roads, 
and find it not enly a saving to 
the county but a great benefit to 
the roads. One has only to go to 
the Santa Fe depot to see the 
effect of oil on the ground. It not 
only lays the dust, but makes the 
ground hard and durable. 

B. S. Gurnee is heating the oil 
by the use of steam and it will be 
applied from the county's sprink- 
ling cart. Supervisor Tomer has 
purchased the heaviest oil he 
could get, believing it to be the 
best for the purpose, and it could 
not be used at all without heating. 

All who have tried oil on roads 
say it must be applied in a heated 
state to get the best results. — Han- 
ford Journal. 



The following are the differ, 
between coal and bitumen 

Co. -.pressed anil chemi- 

cally a'tered vegetable matter. 

Bitumen is a distillate from 
chemically altered vegetable mat- 
ter. 

\i\ IdenCJ I of the origin 01 
and bitumen may be gathered from 
the geological position of the de- 
posits, their mineral characteristics 
and chemical nature. 

["nder the microscope rhOSl ol 
the coals show forms of vegetable 
matter. 

The visual appearance of the 
bitumeu under a high magnify- 
ing power give no evidence of its 
1 origin. 

Coal may be viewed as a strati- 
fied rock in which layers of other 
geological formations such as clays, 
sandstones, shales, and limestones 
are found. 

Bitumen is not a stratified rock. 
It is intruded into fissures and 
cracks and has flowed into porous 
and seamed strata. Intrusions of 
bitumen are found cutting forma- 
tions at all angles with the plane 
of bedding. 

Bitumen is entirely soluble in 
chloroform, turpentine and carbon- 
bisulphide and partly soluble in 
ether. 

Chloroform, turpentine and 
carbon-bisulphide dissolve a slight 



amount 

le in these 

iltS. 

rtitumen can be obtained 

llation, but 
in no other km 

Uitumcn cannot be converted to 
coal, and there is no geological 
evidence that such , oin 
lire. 

All hydrocarbons are volatile. 
The ultimate resolution of coal Is 
anthracite, nearly pure cat 
whereas tin- ultimate resolution 
of bitumen is an asphaltum rich 
in asphaltene. 

California Production to Date. 
California production up to this 
time by years is as follow 

Year. Barrelfl 

Previous i" iS;(> . . 1 , 

1 2.000 

1S77 1 

1S7.S 

iST'l 



1SS1 

ISS.' I 

IXN.i [ 

ISS.) 

l88j .; 

1886 377,M5 

r887 <.7S.57^ 

[H88 6g 

iSSij 303.220 

[800 t 

lS.,l 32 

I892 3*5,".)'> 

I»93 i; 

lS()| 705 

1895 [,208,482 

[896 1,252,777 

lSy7 [,903,411 

1848 2,237,207 

1899 2,292,1 - i 

I9O0 4,329,950 

1901 8,75o,oeo 

Total 27,919,329 



SUNSET 
LIMITED 



NEW ORLEANS and 
NEW YORK 

N PR \N> . p, 111. 

;•. 111. 

Arrive NEW ORLEANS 7-'" l>. m. 
Thursdays, Sstunl 

Among Ih- •! Highways of 

Travel not one equuls 1 ibis 

train. Get tin- little liook, "\\'i- 
1 the 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

Initial trip of Sunset Limited 
Friday, Dei-. 6, from Satl Knmcisco. 



Pacific 
Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Subscription, $2.50 Per Year 



50c Asphaltum Refinery 50c 

A Very Rare Chance to Buy at a Low Figure 

Gilt=Edged Stock 



Inside of two months this valuable 

We leased land in McKittrick, half a mile from the 
station, and have large producing wells within 50 to 
500 yards on all sides. 

We own 80 acres in Coalinga, near famous 1000- 
barrel Home Oil gusher, and 160 acres adjoining 
Calistoga oil well in Napa County. 

Derrick and outhouses erected. As soon as price 
of oil warrants, two wells will be pushed to a finish. 
We have just leased 

6000 ACRES 0000 ACRES 

of land that produces untold quantities of asphalt 
near Sargents Station. 



stock will cost you One Dollar. 

We have concluded contracts for the sale of our 
asphalt at a figure which will enable us to pay divi 
dends very shortly. 

We are ready to contract carload lots for crude or 
refined asphaltum. 

All the houses are erected and Refining Works 
NOW COMPLETED. 

No empty promises, but absolute facts. 

Ordinary business sagacity tells you that dividends 
in this large enterprise must be earned inside of 90 
days. 

Asphaltum is a staple article. Ours at $20 per ton 
is better than the Trinidad at $35. 



STANDARD ROCK OIL COMPANY 

Capitalization Only 300,000 Shares at $1 par Value. Stock Nonassessable. 

475=476 Parroitt Building, 855 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE, SOUTH 488 

Proven oil lands in Napa and Coalinga for sale cheap. 

AGENTS WANTED in All Large Cities for the Sale of Our Al Refined Asphaltum 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly 

The OB Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

■indorsed By the California Petroleum 
Miners' Association. 



W B. WINN. Editor and Publisher 



Office and Editorial rooms 



318 Pine Street, San Francisco 



Telephone, Bush, 176 
TERMS 

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Six Months f 5" 

Three Months 1 "° 

Single Copies ICH - 

STRICTLY IN 4.DV4NCE 



Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
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writer ? s name and address, not necessarily '' 
publication, but as a Ruarsntee of good 



for 
faith. 



Entered in the PostofBce at San Francisco, 
as second-class matter. 



the various oil-bearing districts. 
At the close of the year there 
were 2,040 productive wells oper- 
ated in the state, whose total pro- 
duction aggregated 8,742,500 bar- 
rels. The statement confirms the 
estimates made in the "Chronicle's 
Annual," which gave the total 
actual production as variously 
estimated at from 7,500,000 to 
9,000,000 barrels. There are, how- 
ever, 355 wells in the several dis- 
tricts, all except three of which 
have been capped, owing to high 
freight rates and to prevent over- 
stocking. If these wells wtre 
operated the Chronicle's estimated 
total capacity of 16,000,000 barrels 
a year could be reached easily. 

The most suggestive feature in 
the statement, however, is the 
demonstration made that the bulk 
of the petroleum produced is com- 
ing from wells lying north of the 
Tebachapi range. This fact, in 
itself, explains the reason why 
the railroad companies are making 
such a determined effort to resist 
the reduction of the freight rates 
as established by the railroad com 



A. Weith contributes an article on 
the above subject. He points out 
that liquid fuel is used in one of 
two ways, either the residuals are 
used by themselves or they are 
mixed with water. The first 
method is principally adopted in 
Russia, and the second which 
originated in England under the 
name of Holden's system is used 
on the Great Eastern Railway and 
also on the chief French railways. 
It has also been introduced on the 
Austrian Metropolitan Railways, 
and in running through the Arl- 
berg Tunnel. The liquid fuel used 
in the latter cases, is a crude oil 
obtained from the gas works. In 
Roumania the combined system is 
also used — petroleum residuals be- 
ing combined with lignite. Ex- 
periments, moreover, have also 
been made in the same direction 
on Hungarian State railways and 
the author deals chiefly with the 
results obtained on the latter. In 
these experiments particular atten- 
tion has been directed to the exact 
size of the injectors. Precise cal- 
culation has been made in regard 



and easily regulated. 3. There is 
a complete absence of smoke. 

4. The tubes are always clean. 

5. The furnace door can always be 
kept closed, and thus the boiler 
does not suffer from a variation in 
temperature. 6. The wear and 
tear is considerably less when 
using oil, as it is free from sulphur. 
7. For trains of the same weight a 
great distance can be covered 
without stoppage for the reason 
that 30 per cent more water can 
be taken in. 9. The evaporative 
power of the bo:lers is 50 per cent 
greater, thus enabling heavier 
trains to be drawn. 



Indiana's Oil Industry. 



The northern field is a to the quantity of steam produced 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1902 

Considerable attention has been 
directed of late 
Oil in Japan to Japan as an 
oil producing 
district. A number of small wells 
have been drilled there and the 
production is satisfactory from a 
refining standpoint. The wells in 
Japan do not average over 400 
feet in depth and many of them 
are gushers, some of them flowing 
intermittently at intervals of about 
an hour, when there will be an 
eruption that will send the oil 
thirty feet above the derrick. 

The oil belt in Japan cresses 
the country from southeast to 
northwest, is several hundred miles 
In length and varies from ten to 
forty miles in width. The geo- 
logical formation is upper tertiary, 
and the oil-bearing rocks are mainly 
brownish sandstone. The oil va- 
ries in gravity from fourteen to 
forty-six degrees, the lighter oils 
going as high as seventy per cent 
illuminate. 

Those in a position to judge 
state that the Standard Oil people 
intend to obtain control of the 
Japan oil district, and will supply 
the demand of the Orient from 
that field. 



CALIFORNIA'S OIL. 



The 



"Chronicle's" View of 
Journal's Statistics. 



this 



The Pacific Oil, Reporter has 
published a concise statement of 
the production of petroleum in 
California during the year 1901, 
which tells at a glance the great 
importance of the industry and 
the comparative productiveness of 



big producer of traffic, and, under 
the vicious rule of making the 
traffic carry all it will bear, is a 
rich prize. 

Out of the 2 040 wells from which 
oil was drawn during the year, 
1766 lie in Southern California, 
the remaining 274 being in the 
southern end of the San Joaquin 
valley. But the total production 
of the former aggregated only 
3,480,000 barrels, while the latter 
produced 5,262,500 barrels. The 
greater superiority of the oil fields 
north of Tehachapi over those 
lying south of that range is more 
conclusively shown in the com- 
parison between the productive 
wells in Los Angeles city and 
those in the Kern River district. 
In the former there are 1,013 pro- 
ductive wells, which yielded dur- 
ing the year 1,255,000 barrels of 
oil. In the Kern River district 
only 184 productive wells were 
operated, but they yielded 3 870,- 
000 barrels. The average produc- 
tion of the Los Angeles wells was 
thus only 1,251 barrels, while that 
of the wells in the Kern River 
district exceeded 21,000 barrels. 
The immense possibilities of the 
noithern field when reasonable 
freights are charged for trans- 
portation is evirced in the fact 
that there are now 352 productive 
wells in Coalinga, Kern River, 
McKittrick, Sunset and Midway 
districts closed to await the de- 
velopment of more favorable con- 
ditions for the transportation of 
oil to market. The vicious policy 
of high freights is thus retarding 
production and development in 
this important oil field. — San Fran- 
cisco Chronicle. 



LOCOMOTIVE OIL FUEL. 



Methods and Results on Some 
European Railways. 

In a recent issue of our Galician 
contemporary, "Naphtha," Dr. D. 



by coal alone and oil alone in the 
same locomotive. The coal em- 
ployed was obtained from Dombran 
and gave an evaporation of 6.61 
kilogs. of water per 1 kilogram of 
coal used. Under the same con- 
ditions, 1 kilogram of oil evapo- 
rated 1132 kilogs. of water. It 
was also proved that oil warmed 
before it is injected into the fur- 
nace has a quantity of water 
evaporated. 

On the passenger train from 
Budapesth to Czigled, running at 
the speed of 15 kilometers per 
hour and carrying a weight of 292 
tons with 341 kilogs. of oil, 42 
cubic meters of water were evapo- 
rated. This gives an evaporative 
result of 12.2 kilogs. of water per 
kilogram of oil used, representing 
340 kilogs. of oil per 1000 ton 
kilometers. 

On an express train traveling 
between Budapesth and Pressbur^, 
a speed of 80 kilometers per hour 
was obtained. The weight of the 
train was 260 tons. When coal 
was used, this speed could only be 
maintained by reducing the freight 
to 150 tons. Thus it will be seen 
that when oil was used, the carry- 
ing capacity was increased by 73 
per cent. In this locomotive the 
furnace was lined with fire bricks; 
677 kilogs. of oil were used, and 
6.78 cubic meters of water evapo- 
rated, showing only 10 kilogs. per 
kilogram of oil used. 

Further experiments were also 
made with an inferior class of coal, 
whereby it was found that only 
4.5 kilogs. cf water were evapo- 
rated per 1 kilogram of coal. These 
experiments were carried on ior a 
period of five months on the Hun- 
garian railways, and from which 
the author draws the following 
conclusions: 1. The firing of the 
locomotive with liquid fuel main- 
tains an equal temperature. 2. The 
evaporation of water is very rapid 



A General Glance at its Statistics 
at the Present Time. 

The oil industry of Indiana is 
growing into one of great magni- 
tude. It has only been about ten 
years since the oil business started 
in this Stat§ in a small way, and 
has since made wonderful strides. 
It has increased to a larger portion 
within the limit of time than any 
other industry of the State. The 
oil business is practically consid- 
ered a new thing for Indiana, and 
is just in its infancy. No other 
oil field in this country has a 
future before it for high grade 
oil like Indiana has. The drill 
has only spread over a portion of 
the State, and the famous gas belt 
remains incognito for the develop- 
ment of crude oil. 

The large producers will be 
found within the limits of the 
wonderful gas fields, but not until 
the gas pressure grows so meagre 
that the oil will force its way up 
to the gas pocket. The time is 
bound to come when Indiana 
gushers will be plentiful, but the 
time is not ripe for that yet. Mil- 
lions of dollars have been invested 
in the drilling of wells, equipping 
them, iron storage tanks, pipe 
lines and other necessaries to 
make the wells produce, and there 
are millions more in sight for the 
farmer, business men, laborers and 
lease owners to procure in the 
future. There is sufficient oil 
territory now in sight in the State 
to keep the drill pounding, on the 
completion of 250 wells per month 
for many years to come. Opera- 
tions have already been going on 
for over a dozen years, and only 
small spots have been drilled over, 
so far, and they are only partially 
drilled. The producing area of 
the State at the present writing is 
located in Wells, Adams, Grant, 
Blackford, Jay, Huntington, Dela- 
ware, Wabash, Miami, Marion, 
Madison, Vigo, Carroll, Hamilton, 
Martin, Pulaski and Jasper coun- 
ties, as well as Randolph and many 
others. 

The year of 1901 has been a 
very prosperous one for all that 
have been identified with the oil 
business in Indiana. The year is 
credited with the completion of 
2586 wells, of which 442 were 
listed as only gas producers or dry 
holes. This makes a total com- 
pleted wells in the State since 
operations first started of 18,338, 
of which 4947 were worthless for 
oil, but furnished gas as fuel. 
Figuring all wells completed at an 
average of $2000 apiece, represents 
an outlay of the enormous sum of 
$36,676,000, to say nothing of the 
millions invested in pipe lines, 
storage tanks, refineries and other 
equipments. 









SANTA BARBARA. 

Petroleum Taking First Place 
Among It* Industrie*. 

The most important mineral pro- 
duct of Santa Barbara county at 
the present time is petroleum. 
The larger quantity of this ii 
in its crude state, for fuel under 
boilers, while a small percentage 
is refined, liquid asphalt, lubricat- 
ing oil and other by-products re 
suiting. There is a ready market 
for fuel oil, and the Santa Barbara 
producers have an advantage over 
the fields of the interior sections 
of the state in that shipments may 
be made by water as well as by 
rail, and the transportation rates 
are consequently not excessive 
A portion of the output of the 
Summerland field is utilized 
locally, all steam plauts in this 
vicinity burning oil. The South 
ern Pacific company consumes a 
considerable amount in its loco- 
motives, and the sugar factory at 
Oxnard takes the remainder. 

The wells at Summerland pro- 
duced during 1901 _________ 

about 200,000 bar- 
rels of oil. This 
had an aggregate 
value of about 
$1 50,000. The first 
oil well in Sum- 
merland was de- 
veloped about a 
dozen years ago, 
and since then 
there has been a 
gradual increase 
in production, and 
at the same time 
the producing prea 
has extended to 
the beach and into 
the sea, the larger 
part of the oil now 
being pumped 
from wells drilled 
from wharves ex- 
tending 500 feet 
or more into the 
ocean. The best 
wells are located 
the farthest from the beach, and 
an interesting problem has been 
raised as to means of reaching the 
deeper sub-marine oil field known 
to exist beneath the Santa Barbara 
channel. . 

During the year there has not 
been much development work in 
Summerland, although one new oil 
wharf has been constructed by the 
North Star company. 

Summerland is located between 
Montecito and Carpenteria, and 
has been practically "made" by 
the oil discovery, although ori- 
ginally founded as a spiritualistic 
colony. 

Until the past year, the oil pro- 
duction has been confined to 
Summerland; there are strong 
evidences of oil in many other 
parts of the county. It would 
surprise no one familiar with con- 
ditions if a few years hence the 
value of the petroleum pumped 
in this county would equal the 
total value of all the other pro- 



ducts combined. Prospecting work n< weird appearance - inborn 1 

D progress in no itarting up just as 
tricts both along the coast and in being bleached to the . te mach- 
ine interior. ,„ be put in place. 

to oil and m fact once the spheavals to In- solid masses In the district 2.000 acres are 

holding firsl place is the minine, of blue ami brown 1 r- controlled by the Oakland Oil aud 

of asphalt. Illimitable bed dded with mm and Gas company, and a farther 1 

this valuable paving product have isolated pieces of a hard. rritSS Oil ami 

been located here and streets in lata slime-like cb Mining company. The latter wsj 

many cities of America and Ku- The Shale is In well-defined ledge*, the first company to actually be- 

rope are paved with S.uita Ilu alternating hard aud soft, the gin work in the Devil's Den, hav 

bira asphalt. At the present latter being worn away and thus ing sent the drill down 1S6 feet 

lime, the output is limited because leaving the hsrdstreaks prominent, with a small artesian well outfit. 



of the restrictions of the asphalt 
combine; but Independent com- 
panies are at work, and the time 



uliar. undulating appearance Later a standard rig was erected 
being given to the sides of the on 13, (5-18, but no success at- 
hills. The general dip of the tended the effort to find oil. The 
is not far off when the Santa liar rock in Devils Den la northeast, Devil's Den Development com- 
bara material will again take first at an angle of from twenty-live to pany sank a well on section 2^, 
place in the list of the available thirty degrees, ami it is said that but a lost bit resulted in the absn- 



asphalt supplies. 



IN DEVIL'S DEN. 



Vluch Development W, fk to be 
Dune in This District. 

Reports from several oil fields 
are to the effect that preparations 
are being made for the beginning 
of a good deal of new work Prob 



n 




J *M_f.l___. 



P»ij___ 



SUBMARINE WELI.S AT SUMMER tAND, SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. CAL. 



ably no work that willbe begun will 
be of greater interest, however, 
than that contemplated in the 
region extending between Tem- 
blor on the south and the Kreyen- 
hagen district on the north. Many 
oil men have continued to adhere 
to the belief that the oil belt ex- 
tends with more or less continuity 
from the Sunse't-McKittrick fields 
through the Devil's Dan district on 
to Coallnga, and now further ex- 
ploitation of the Devil's Den coun- 
try is to be made. This district 
bearing the uncanny name is situ- 
ated in the northwest part of Kern 
county, aud comprises township 
25, 17, 18 19, township 26, 18-19, 
township 27, 18-19, and township 
28, 19-20. It is about forty -five 
miles southeast from the town of 
Hanford, which is the chief out- 
fitting point, and about forty miles 
north from the McKittrick field. 



there are evidences that the dip is donrnent of the well. A second 
much less under the surface. The attempt was made, but it failed to 
strike of the dip is from northwest reach oil, and work was suspended. 
to southeast, being nearly straight s evera ] olher con] p anies were 
in some places and sinuous in r , . , .. .. _ , .,, _ 

others. Seepages of a heavy, tar- f ° rmed ,0 ex P lo,t ,he Dev ' 1 s Dtu ' 
like oil occur in many place's, and but to date nothing but discour- 
at one or two of the few springs to agement has rewarded the efforts 
be lound in the district much gas P ut forth. 

is emitted. Not far from the Kettleman 

The Western Oil and Refinery hills and north of the little town 

of Dudley are what 
have been known 
as the Hsperanza 
wells. Some dril- 
ling has heretofore 
been engaged in at 
this point, and it 
is learned that one 
of the standard 
rigs used by the 
English syndicate 
in the Coalinga 
field is to be sent 
down when an- 
other attempt will 
be made to strike 
oil. Heretofore the 
cost of transpos- 
ing fuel, and in- 
deed all supplies, 
has been a severe 
handicap to the 
development of 
this district. The 
total isolation from 
the outside world 
has also served as 
a deterrent to men going into such 
a benighted region. Now, however, 
it is stated that an automobile ser- 
vice is to be put on between Sunset 
and Coalinga, via McKittrick, 
Devil's Den and Kreyenhagen, 
and the bi-weekly service will 
suffice to keep operators in the 
field in touch with the outside 
world by letters and small parcels 
that it is stated will be carried. 

Though not an inviting field 
owing to a scarcity of fuel and 
water, and also on account of its 
inaccessibility, oil men who have 
been there are earnest in their be- 
lief that when the proper ground 
is struck an oil development will 
ensue that will make the Devil's 
Den compare favorably with 
either of the fields to the north or 
south of it. 




company — better known as the 
Spreckels company- — has had pos- 
session of four sections in town- 
ship 25-18, and last year drilled 
one well, with which difficulties 
of one kind and another were had 
and which finally resulted in 
practical abandonment. The Los 
Angeles Herald s ys that it has 
recently been reported from Han- 
ford that H. W. Watkins, super- 
intendent for the company, an- 
nounced that drilling will again 
be resumed in the spring. A rig 
has been purchased having dia- 
mond points and that isguaranteed 
to make 1,200 feet in twenty-eight 
days in any kind of formation. A 
similar rig utilized in drilling a 
well in the Kettleman Plains dis- 
trict did not prove efficient, for 
the reason that it took too much 
water to operate it, and the ground 
kept caving in. Nevertheless Mr. 



During the summer months the Watkins believes this later rig 
general appearance of the district j w ;i] work all right. The Gibbs 
is very striking by reason of its Oil company operated successfully 
extreme and almost painful white- on 36, 26-17, and has now sold out 



The Stock Exchange Building 
at Bakersfield will be completed 
and ready for occupancy about 
the middle of next month. 



8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



IN SANTA CLARA. 



Oil Industry Taking Prominent 
Place in This County. 

Oil on a paraffine base- -that is, 
illuminating oil, as distinguished 
from asphaltum or fuel oil — was 
discovered in Santa Clara county 
asearly as 1878. 

The wells in Moody Gulch, 
located on the west side of Los 
Gatos canyon, about two miles 
above the station and town of 
Alma, a short distance from the 
line of railroad between San Fran- 
cisco and Santa Cruz, were the 
first drilled in this county, and in 
the very first well sunk fine paraf- 
fin oil was struck at a depth of 
eight hundred feet. The San Jose 
Mercury says: That between 1878 
and 18S8 ten or more wells were 
sunk, the altitude of the wells 
above the sea level running from 
eleven hundred to nearly fourteen 
hundred feet. The formation 
varied with the wells, but generally 
speaking it consisted of sandstone, 
slate and shale, with streaks of 
shelly and oily sand, until the 
main underlying oil measure was 
reached. There was much natural 
gas, and this was utilized for 
operating the engines. For many 
years the output from these wells 
averaged three hundred barrels a 
month, all of which was sold for $3 
a barrel. The oil was piped to a 
point on the ra lroad at the foot of 
Moody Gulch, whence it was ship- 
ped to San Jose and San Francisco. 
At present no oil is being shipped 
from these wells, although in a 
few of the old wells oil is standing 
almost up to the surface ends of 
the pipes. The property changed 
hands two years ago, since which 
time a new well has been sunk 
and other improvements made. 
Considerable money is being ex- 
pended therein n;w developments 
and the owners appear to be satis- 
fied that within the next year 
they will be shipping large quan- 
tities of the best oil in California 
to the San Jose and San Francisco 
markets. 

A NEW INDUSTRY. 

It is a singular fact that the 
known presence of paraffin oil in 
Moody Gulch and the indications 
of oil in the Gilroy section of the 
valley had no effect whatever on 
local and other California capi- 
talists, who in the meanwhile were 
engaging in all sorts of financial 
enterprises abroad. With the ex- 



ception of a few local geologists, 
who had carefully studied the 
formations of this valley and had 
become convinced that a vast and 
incalculably valuable oil measure 
underlay it, all local residents 
were indifferent to the subject un- 
til the oil development in Southern 
California and in the Bakersfield 
and Fresno sections of the Tulare 
and San Joaquin valleys brought 
oil distinctively to the front as a 
great and profitable resource of 
California. Then inquiry began 
to be made concerning the oil 
possibilities of Santa Clara valley 
and a demand sprung up for 
properties that were believed to be 
in the oil belt. That was three 
years ago, since which time nearly 
a dozen companies have been car- 
rying on operations in this county 
and just across the line in Santa 
Cruz and San Mateo counties. 

The oil so far discovered in this 
county, in the old wells and the 
new, indicate that there are two 
distinct classes of oil here — para- 
ffin oil ar.d asphaltum oil — the first 
being in the mountain belt and 
the latter in the valley. Oil on a 
paraffin basis, being that from 
which illuminating oil is made, is 
the highest priced in the market; 
but so far has been found in only 
limited quantities in California, 
while the asphaltum oil, though 
selling for much less, usually pro- 
duces much more to the well. 
The latter is valuable, however, 
because of the high price of coal 
in this state, and if produced in 
sufficient quantity it will settle 
the problem of cheap California 
manufacturers, enabling capital to 
convert local raw materials into 
finished products instead of send- 
ing them East, there to be made 
up, and then returned to this state 
for local consumption. The fact 
that outside capital has invested 
largely in Santa Clara county 
during the last two years in oil 
lands and that local capital has 
also awakened to the fact that 
profitable oil investments are here 
right at hand point to a develop- 
ment of this hitherto almost 
neglected resource that means an 
addition of many millions of dol- 
lars to the wealth ot the county 
before the end of the present 
decade. 

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS. 

A brief mention of the oil opera- 
tions now being conducted in 



Santa Clera county can be made 
in this article. The Gilroy Oil 
company, of which E. D. Crawford 
is secretary, is operating about 
seven miles west of Gilroy, in the 
southern end of the county, in the 
vicinity of the Uvas valley. This 
is a strictly local corporation, its 
stock being owned by citizens of 
Gilroy, who, however, gratefully 
acknowledge some financial as- 
sistance from two well known 
citizens of San Jose at the very 
beginning of the enterprise. The 
company has excellent prospects, 
and its stockholders have faith 
that oil will be opened up in pay- 
ing quantity. 

A Watsonville company is op- 
erating in the vicinity of the big 
asphalt deposits in Sargent dis- 
trict, below Gilroy, and at present 
it is engaged in sinking a new 
well. This is promising territory, 
as an old well, sunk there several 
years ago but abandoned because 
of a broken pipe and tools lost in 
the well, is now flowing from 
three to four barrels of oil a day. 
The Watsonville company has 
put jSro.ooo or more in machinery 
and is going ahead with the work 
as rapidly as possible. 

An outside company has been 
engaged for a year or more in 
sinking two wells on the Sargent 
place, a few miles south of Gilroy. 
Oil indications were discovered 
there years ago. The wells are 
down nine hundred feet each and 
present indications point to an 
abundance of oil. 

Another oil well is being sunk 
on the Little Pescadero creek, at 
the extreme western limit of the 
Sargent ranch, and some oil has 
already been found. 

The Hub Oil company is a 
purely local organization, the 
property consisting of nearly 1,100 
acres near the summit, in the 
vicinity of Moody Gulch. Its first 
well is down 1,150 feet, and is 
now in a dark shale, with some 
oil, of the paraffine class, and it is 
believed that the main oil-bearing 
sands are close at hand. It may 
be said in this connection that oil 
of a paraffine base commands $2 a 
barrel at the well, as against 25 
cents a barrel for oil of an asphalt 
base. 

The Orchard company, consist- 
ing of San Francisco and Oakland 
capital, has been operating in the 
valley on the H. H. Main place 
during the summer and recently 



quite an abundance of oil was 
struck. Oil was found on this 
place three years ago, but for 
some reason the wells were aban- 
doned before having been fully 
tested. Two wells have been 
sunk by the present lessees and 
the drills are now in what is be- 
lieved to be the main oil-bearing 
sand stratum, which may prove to 
be several hundred feet in thick' 
ness. Until the bottom has been 
reached not even an approximate 
estimate of the probable daily 
yield can be made, but present 
indications point to an abundance, 
of oil. 

A company of Los Gatos citi- 
zens has been operating for a year 
or more on Bear creek, just be- 
yond the summit, west of Los 
Gatos and in the line with the 
Moody Gulch wells. Beth oil and 
gas have been found, and the 
prospects are excellent for a good 
flowing well. 

Another company, in which a 
few prominent San Joseans are 
interested, is boring beyond the 
summit west of Saratoga, with 
every indication of success. 

Kansas city capital has been 
invested in oil operations at Lone 
Hill vineyard, near Almaden, 
where boring is now going on, 
and the oil indications are en- 
couraging. 

An oil company recently has 
been organized to bore on the 
Marquis property, near that of 
H. H. Main, and preparations are 
bang made for extensive opera- 
tions at that point. 

Wells are being drilled in Santa 
Cruz county, just west of the 
dividing line between that and 
Santa Clara' county, and the opera- 
tions extend through San Benito 
and Monterey counties to the San 
Joaquin valley and to Half Moon 
Bay by the ocean on the north- 
west. That oil exists under this 
valley and the mountains contigu- 
ous to it is no longer a matter of 
surmise but one of actual knowl- 
edge, and its production in vast 
quantities is only a question of 
capital and energy in conjunction 
with a special and expert knowl- 
edge of oil-bearing formations. 

Another resource of Santa Clara 
county, one that is just beginning 
to be developed, is asphalt, a sub- 
stance for which there is a wide 
and ever-increasing demand for 
use in street construction. In the 
Sargent district, near Gilroy, is a 



Fishing Tools 



Fishing Tools 



A full line of fishing tools constantly on hand for rent. Casing speais, casing cutters, swedges, combination slip sockets, slip 
sockets, horn sockets, bull dog sockets, under-reamers, rope spears, rope grab, rope sockets, spuds, boot-jacks, fishing jars, subs, 
spiders or ring and wedge, tool wrenches, tool hooks, jar-knockers, elevators, and anything else pertaining to the oil business. 

Bishop Fishing Tool Company 

91 Fremont Street, San Francisco. 

Branches at McKitjrick and Sunset, 



PACIFIC OIL RRPORTKR 



body of asphalt, the extent of 
which has not been determined, 
but which is known to cover at 
least several hundred acres of land. 
A company is now preparing to 
get out a considerable quantity (or 
the general market, and it has an 
agent in Chicago, w ho is endeavor- 
ing to procure large contracts for 
delivery there fir street pun 
Should he be I. the im- 

mediate output will be enormous i 
and in any event there is no ques- 
tion that this large asphalt depo-it 
will soon prove to be a highly 
valuable source of local we altli. 



Slump in Oil Values. 

The latest explanation of the 
slump in petroleum values comes 
from Wall Street. The market 
has been editorially discussed from 
the field and pipe lint view in 
these columns, the conclusion 
based on undisputed facts being 
that the decliue from $1.30 for 
Eastern and 89 and 94 cents for 
Western oil was not warranted. 

It appears that in the searching 
analysis given the recent mysteri- 
ous slumpin Standard Oil securities 
by Wall street ferrets, deductions 
have been made that may throw 
some light on the other mysterious 
slump — the one that spoiled 
Christmas for the oil producers. 
The pronouncement has been 
made in Wall Street that there 
are no known conditions which 
can explain or justify the immense 
stock market decline referred to. 
Only Rockefeller can explain the 
three cuts in oil made recently 
and they in turn explain the loss 
of $50,000,000 in stock exchange 
values. The oil market is quiet 
except in Russia. The produc- 
tion is hardly equal to the de- 
mand. According to conditions, 
Rockefeller should have increased 
crude oil prices. Texas had noth- 
ing to do with the cut. The 
Standard has made no invest- 
ments there, although its experts 
have investigated the section 
thoroughly. Pennsylvania is nor- 
mal. There is nothing there to 
justify the cuts. Rockefeller has 
agents on the ground wherever 
a new strike of oil as in Egypt 
occurs. The Standard is a world- 
wide influence. It can, if it will 



exert an influence on any field. 
There has been tion 

among Standard Oil stockholders 
this year because John D. K 
felUr decided to pay only a 48 
per cent dividend. Perhap- 
Rockefeller ti • ethcd of 

beating down the values of their 
holdings just to let them know 
that he doesn't like human hogs. 
This is the Wall Street theory 
and explanation of the slump in 
oil and securities. These 
ferrets — men who never --tc p until 
they get at the bottom of things — 
hold that Mr. Rockefeller is dis- 
disciplining his associate .stock- 
holders his views In i n >; that auy 
Stockholder who grumbles at a |S 
per cent dividend (light to have 
a rinK put in his nose. Can it be 
that the head of the great oil com- 
pany is only ' ringing 1 some of the 
Standard Oil porkers? But the 
nil producers, bow about them? — 
Taint, Oil and Drug Revie-". 

In Utah. 

The Emery County Progress 
says that work at the California- 
Utah company's oil well, near 
Green River, is progressing very 
satisfactory. Ira Browning came 
in from the well Monday and re- 
ports that the well was then over 
450 feet deep. Some delay was 
caused the latter part of last week 
by a break in drilling apparatus 
and it was necessary to fish some 
tools from the hole. By Saturday 
boring was again under way. 
Water was encountered at a depth 
of 370 feet, but was of poor qual- 
ity, it was stated. For the first 
300 feet the drill was mostly in 
shale. Then some fifty feet of 
lime rock followed, then more 
shale, then sandstone. Manager 
Don Robbins thought that the 
sandstone would prove to be at 
least 200 feet thick. The manager 
is of the opinion that a flow of oil 
will be struck somewhere between 
1,700 and 2,000 feet. At the rate 
of progress so far maintained that 
depth should be reached within 
the next forty days. 



Every department of the Espee 
shops at Sacramento are working 
at their full capacity. Nearly 
3 000 men are employed. Orders 
for many cars have been placed 
in Eastern shops, and five of the 
latest pattern oil-burning engines 
have been ordered. 



IN ALAMEDA. 

Twcntj Mile* of Rond Near Liter 
more to Be Treated W 1 1 1. Oil. 

At the re<p 
Horner, the other members of the 
boprd, accompanied him to Liver- 
nu re Monday to make nil ii 
tion of road conditions here with 
B, S Mosher, a road oilin; 
pert, with a view of making a 
practical demonstration of the 
efficacy of the new plan for laying 
dust and preserving roads. Mr. 
Mosher pronounced the conditions 
as ideal and demonstrated the 
feasibility of oiling the roads so 
thoroughly that the board readily 
granted Supervisor Horner per- 
mission to have twenty miles of 
road in his district treated during 
the coming season. 

Ml Homer arranged with Mr. 
Mosher, who is a member of the 
firm of De Camp S; Mosher, offi- 
cially known as the San Joaquin 
Road Oiling company with head- 
quarters at Bakersfield, to begin 
work as soon as the rains are over 
iu the spring. The Ttsla road 
and the Arroyo Valle road as far 
as Cresta Blanca will be the roads 
treated in this portion of the town- 
ship, together with the new Dub- 
lin road in the Pleasanton end of 
the township. 

Mr. Mosher's company applies 
the oil hot, which all experts now 
agree is the correct method and he 
claims that it will mix with the 
soil readily and make an ideal 
road at a small cost, not to exceed 
$125 a mile for the first applica- 
tion. After the first application 
he contends that the road can be 
kept in good condition at small 
expense as compared with water 
sprinkling. 

Mr. Horner is very much in 
earnest in the matter and will 
give oiling a thorough test and if 
it does what he hopes for it he 
will have oil applied to all the 
roads in the district which are not 
being watered. 

The town trustees have dis- 
cussed oil sprinkling for the streets 
and they will now be given an 
opportunity to cooperate with the 
county and oil all the streets that 
connect with county roads at a 
small cost and at the same time 
earn the gratitude of all who live 
along these streets or travel over 
them. — Livermore Herald. 



In Oregon. 

11 W G tes. of Hillsl 
on. a member of the Malheur 

By, was b( :,lay. 

He is looking alter ihc 
of the company that is being 
hauled to Drj Gulch, sonic G 
milis from Weiser, on the Oregon 
Bide. It is claimed to be the 
largest drilling outfit north of 
California, weighing sixty tons. 
A derrick 100 feel high will be 
erected. The power will be sup 
p'ied by steam, a forty 1: 
power engine being on the ground. 

Mr Gates says the mill is built to 
go down 5,000 feet, and will be 
sent to that depth if necessary. 
Kxperts say the surface indica- 
tions are the best they ever 
DOticed, COnsistingOf Pennsylvania 
sandstone, mud springs, a two-foot 
vein of lignite and evidences of 
natural gas. It is also Mr. Gates' 
opinion that if oil is found there 
it will no doubt be found through 
this entire vicinity, as the same 
indications exist iu numerous 
places. The membeis of the com- 
pany are chiefly Portland men, 
who have made up a fund of $20,- 
000 to prospect the work. 

Oil Land Contest. 

E. E. Bush and C. C. Spinks 
went over to Visalia this morning 
to appear in the United States 
Land Office against a contest 
which has been brought by scrip- 
pers who have jumped certain 
portions of section 22 in the 
Coalinga district, and are now 
contesting the title. I he land 
under contest comprises that filed 
upon by the Great Northern and 
Merced Oil companies and adjoins 
the Caribou property. The parties 
bringing the contest in the land 
office are F. A. Hyde & Co. of 
San Francisco, Hyde being the 
man who first drew a map of Tu- 
lare Lake and the surrounding 
country while sitting in his office 
in the city a number of years ago. 
Mr. Bush claims that the land 
under contest was actually being 
improved at the time the same 
was jumped, and that there were 
fifteen men at work building der- 
ricks and bunk-houses. This, the 
defendants expect to prove before 
the United States Land Commis- 
sioners today in Visalia.- — Hanford 
Sentinel, 







warn* 

••:-,' 'v-- .S->-;rAV.;- 




R. H. HERRON CO. 

411 Market Street, San Francisco 

Oil Well Supplies, Tools, Casing, Etc. 



A POINTER FOR OIL MEN. 



. SPINDLE TOP LEASE, Dec. 30, Igor. 
PB IEND TOM- \s you are to take char e e of the Hard Luck Oil Co.'s operations I venture to "give you a pointer". I think 
somebody once saia,' -Man wants but little here below, but au oil man wants it right and quick " 
the OdWe.l Supply Company's tools, as their joints will "go up" and they are made to su.t the California Dnlbng 
boiler is the only style that gives entire satisfaction in this country 
well, advise you to go to Herron's. 



First of all you will want to use 
A large dome 

Concerning Reading Casing, Supplies and Fishing Tools, as 
Your friend, HENRY. 



m&> 



msssssts 

m 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



PACIFIC COAST OIL NEWS. 



Recent Developments in Oil in Various Parts